99th Annual Meeting
Cal Poly Pomona
Pomona, California
June 12 - 15, 2018


Workshops




Examples of Strategies for Active Learning in Undergraduate Biology Education
Day and time TBA
 
Active Learning in Quantitative Courses
Day and time TBA
 
Creativity, Imagination, and Design in STEM Education
Day and time TBA
 
Communicating Science to the Public: Setting Up speaking Clubs/Circles
Day and time TBA
 
3D Printing and Open Source Hardware Science Workshop
Day and time TBA
 
A Hands-on Introduction to Wearable Fashion Electronics
Day and time TBA
 
Advanced Beer Tasting Course at Innovation Brew Works
Friday, 15 June 2018, starting at 1:30 p.m.



Examples of Strategies for Active Learning in Undergraduate Biology Education
Day and time TBA

Session length: 3 hours


Organized by: Julia Ruppell (Department of Biology, University of Portland, Portland, OR; ruppell@up.edu).

The process of engaging students in active learning is connected to positive learning outcomes. Many science departments in higher education are embracing this phenomenon by encouraging instructors to use more active learning in their courses. However, many instructors would benefit from increased knowledge of active learning methods and their usefulness for covering different content in their courses. Instructors benefit when they can learn from others about appropriate teaching strategies and methods along with their potential drawbacks, and this in turn benefits students. This workshop aims to engage faculty and students who are interested in promoting active learning in college science classrooms, especially for biology majors’ courses. Presenters will demonstrate active learning methods that they use, discuss what has worked well for their courses, discuss potential hurdles to utilizing active learning in undergraduate education and request feedback from participants. The information in the workshops will inform participants instructional decision-making and future research about active learning in college science courses.


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Active Learning in Quantitative Courses
Day and time TBA

Session length: 3 hours


Organized by: Victoria Bhavsar (Director of Faculty Center & eLearning, Cal Poly Pomona; vbhavsar@cpp.edu) and Alison Baski (Dean of College of Science, Cal Poly Pomona).

Cal Poly Pomona, Cal State LA, and San Jose State University are collaborating to support faculty in incorporating significant active learning strategies into (i.e. flipping) introductory level quantitative courses including physics, calculus, programming, statics, and discrete mathematics. In this session, participants will select effective active learning strategies to achieve learning goals, draft specific activities, plan a class agenda to support their goals, and plan a course calendar to consistently incorporate active learning.

Note: The organizers for this workship are also organizing a symposium, Multi-Disciplinary Experiences in Flipping Quantitative Course. Click HERE for a description of this workshop.


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Creativity, Imagination, and Design in STEM Education
Day and time TBA

Session length: 3 hours


Organized by: Carl A. Maida (University of California, Los Angeles; cmaida@ucla.edu).

Currently, there is renewed interest in science and the creative imagination. A National Science Foundation workshop on the design of creativity support tools recommended ongoing efforts to: evolve existing and develop new theories of creativity grounded in a deep understanding of creativity; identify the fundamental role of creativity in all disciplines; emphasize education and learning by doing with higher expectations that course projects result in innovative products and discoveries; and help students develop creative “habits of mind,” for example, willingness to take risks and persevere when things go wrong. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi views creativity as “when a person...has a new idea or sees a new pattern and when this novelty is selected by the appropriate field for inclusion in the relevant domain.” He developed the concept of flow, a state of mind in which an individual is performing skilled work at an appropriate level of challenge between anxiety and boredom. For him, it is the “combination of empathy with the living world and a predilection for risk and adventure that leads to the a creative involvement with the life sciences.”

Gerald Holton viewed the primacy of the scientist’s imagination in coming upon a new insight or theory. This link between imagination and innovation is a core premise of the University of Pennsylvania’s Imagination Institute, that “creativity relies on imagination, the conscious representation of what is not immediately present to the senses.” The act of imagining in science and other pursuits requires associative thinking, when the mind is free to wander and make connections across seemingly unrelated ideas. To this end, molecular biologist and Nobel laureate, François Jacob talks about two faces of science: “day science,” including laboratories, experiments and seminars, and “night science,” a world made up of doubt, intuition, and the imagination. Jacob understands innovative science as emerging from “a jumble of untidy efforts, of attempts born of a passion to understand.”

With the goal of developing creative habits of mind, many universities are emphasizing creativity in their curricula, Stanford University requires incoming students to take a course in “creative expression” as part of its general-education curriculum. Students at Carnegie Mellon University's Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences satisfy a “creating” requirement by producing a painting, poem, musical performance, piece of technology, or design an experiment or mathematical proof. At North Carolina State University, members of co- curricular dance troupes, composed mostly of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) majors, view their work in dance and science as complementary, as each emphasizes data-driven techniques, and requires long hours, continuous improvement, and teamwork. The recently established Tsai Center for Innovative Thinking at Yale will provide opportunities for students “to develop the skills crucial to an innovative mindset: design thinking, problem-framing, creative synthesis, clear communication, and refined judgment.” An entire university, The New School in New York, has embraced creativity through design as a comprehensive approach to learning; the vision statement, reads: “...a university where design and social research drive approaches to studying issues of our time, such as democracy, urbanization, technological change, economic empowerment, sustainability, migration, and globalization...(an) intellectual and creative center for effective engagement in a world that increasingly demands better-designed objects, communication, systems, and organizations to meet social needs.” As with all creative processes, design is involved at every step. Design educators Richard Buchanan and Victor Margolin point out that key to the contemporary discovery of design is “a recognition that design exists as the central feature of culture and everyday life in many parts of the world.” Further, they assert that “discovering design...encourages individuals from different disciplines to reflect on design as the place where theory and practice meet for productive purposes.”

With a goal of multidisciplinary dialogue in mind, this session will focus on the role of creativity, design and the imagination in STEM and combine didactic, experiential, and reflective activities to engage audience members, including teachers and informal science educators, and presenters in a professional learning community experience. The intent is to provide an opportunity for collaborative inquiry and a dialogue on how best to promote creativity and to design deeper learning approaches to STEM in the classroom and beyond. Panelists in roundtable format will discuss current issues and future trends in creativity and design in STEM education, including engaging students in authentic STEM research; integrating creativity into the STEM curriculum; and teacher adoption of educational innovations to teach STEM creatively. Participants in a breakout session will consider ways to foster creativity and the growth of the imagination in learning activities.

References:

Richard Buchanan and Victor Margolin, editors. Discovering Design: Explorations in Design Studies. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1995.

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Innovation. New York: Harper-Collins, 1996.

Gerald Holton. The Scientific Imagination. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.

François Jacob. Of Flies, Mice and Men. Translated by Giselle Weiss. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.

“The Birth of the Operon,” Science, 332: Issue 6031, 767, May 13, 2011.

Ben Shneiderman, Gerhard Fischer et al. “Creativity Support Tools: Report from a U.S. National Science Foundation Sponsored Workshop,” International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction 20:2, 61-77, 2006.


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Communicating Science to the Public: Setting Up speaking Clubs/Circles
Day and time TBA

Session length: 3 hours

Limited to 20 participants.

Organized by: Dennis F. Mangan (Director, Chalk Talk Science Project, Santa Rosa, CA; chalktalkscience@gmail.com).

The importance of good communication skills is well recognized. Scientists who can speak and write well have increased credibility, are more likely to get funding, are better teachers, have more impact on policy development, and feel more satisfied in their careers. Yet, many universities and research centers struggle to integrate communication skill-building into their educational curricula and career development for their faculty and technical staff.

This workshop is intended for students and faculty who want to set up a science communication learning program (i.e., speaking club/circle) at your home institution.

The workshop will:
• Highlight key aspects of good science communication to teach
• Show how to integrate science communication training into busy schedules
• Explain how to sustain a science communication training program
• Outline how to evaluate a successful program

Participants will be invited to join a network of science communication leaders to share novel approaches for learning science communication skills.


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3D Printing and Open Source Hardware Science Workshop
Day and time TBA

Session length: 3 hours


Organized by: Joan Horvath and Rich Cameron (Co-founders, Nonscriptum LLC, 155 N Lake Ave, Suite 800, Pasadena CA 91101; joan@nonscriptum.com).

Have you been wondering if you should be using 3D printing and open-source electronics in your own educational or scientific endeavors, but you didn't know where to start? Most scientists and teachers end up doing some DIY inventing along the way, but can you take it farther now that many technologies have plummeted in price? Organizers will frame the possibilities and walk through several technologies in depth, along with some case studies drawn from the projects that will be on display at the Maker Exchange. This three-hour workshop will be a compliment to the Scientific Maker Exchange and will be a deep dive into some of the technologies and projects on display.


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A Hands-on Introduction to Wearable Fashion Electronics
Day and time TBA

Session length: 3 hours


Organized by: Mariappan Jawaharlal (Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; jmariappan@cpp.edu).

Electronics has become an integral part of our life. Everything we use today has some form of electronics. Our cell phones and computers use powerful microprocessors, electronic components, and circuits. Basic electronics and circuitry is very important for all engineers, not just electrical engineers. However, learning about electronics and circuits is usually considered dry and boring. It does not have to be that way. One way to make teaching electronics interesting is by allowing students to design their own gadgets that they can wear and show off. Examples of such gadgets include the design of a tie that lights up, or an earring that displays changing bright colors. It may be a hair bow designed with bright color LEDs or a bike helmet that can change colors in the night. It may be a jacket with built-in GPS, or a dance costume, or, friendship bracelet that can talk. The possibilities are endless, and it is up to the imagination of students.

The objective of this workshop is to introduce the participants to the exciting field of wearable technology. In this workshop participants will learn how to create simple wearable gadgets using an Arduino compatible microcontroller, and accessories. This workshop is based on successfully implementing wearable technology at our K-12 outreach program, Femineers, as well as in our 100 and 200 level courses. The Femineers (Female engineers) program has been growing, and it has been adopted by over 30 schools. The Femineer program has been recognized by the White House in 2016 as one of the most influential programs for increasing educational outcomes and opportunities for female Hispanic K-12 students across the country.


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Advanced Beer Tasting Course at Innovation Brew Works
Friday, 15 June 2018, starting at 1:30 p.m.

Session length: 3.5 hours
Fee: $59

Minimum number of enrollees: 12
Maximum number of enrollees: 36
If this workshop is cancelled due to low enrollment, the registration fee for it will be completely reimbursed to those already signed up.


Organized by: Brisa Blevins (Brewing Education Coordinator, Innovation Brew Works, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; beblevins@cpp.edu). Co-organized by: Melody Young (Manager, Innovation Brew Works, Cal Poly, Pomona, Pomona, CA; mpyoung@cpp.edu. Taught by: Taylor Lane (Lab Technician, Russian River Brewing Company, Santa Rosa, CA, and Instructor, Science of Beer Program, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; tlane73190@gmail.com)
Interview with Aaron Neilson, Director, Dining Services at Cal Poly Pomona
Innovation Brew Works Grand Opening
Inside Look at Innovation Brew Works
Innovation Brew Works Webpage: Innovation Brew Works

This workshop is designed to fit the needs of persons in various levels of craft beer knowledge. Topics include, beer flavor components, fermentation, food and beer pairing, beer flaws (detrimental microbiological activities that occur with a variety of beer flaws, at what point they occur, and the off-flavors they produce), and more. To ensure subject matters are understood to the fullest degree, beer tasting will be offered throughout the course. Upon completion, you are invited to stay in the brewery for a complimentary pint and snacks.

About the instructor: As a Lab Technician for Russian River Brewing Company in Santa Rosa, CA, and previously as the Quality Assurance Technician for Ritual Brewing Company in Redlands, CA, Taylor Lane has been responsible for conducting quality control protocols and developing standard operating procedures for Russian River Brewing Co. Her focus with Russian River includes sensory analysis, yeast management, microbiological methods, and maintenance of specification guidelines. Ms. Lane has also served as a Teaching Associate and supervised undergraduate and graduate level research projects for the Biology Department at Cal Poly Pamona. Taylor holds a Master of Science in Biology, with an emphasis in microbiology, from Cal Poly Pomona and a Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara.


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