99th Annual Meeting
Cal Poly Pomona
Pomona, California
June 12 - 15, 2018


Workshops




Communicating Science to the Public: Setting Up speaking Clubs/Circles
Wednsday, 13 June 2018, starting at 8:30 a.m.
 
An Introduction to Grant Writing for Foundations
Thursday, 14 June 2018, starting at 8:30 a.m.
 
A Hands-on Introduction to Wearable Fashion Electronics
Thursday, 14 June 2018, starting at 1:30 p.m.
 
Active Learning in Quantitative Courses
Thursday, 14 June 2018, starting at 1:30 p.m.
 
Examples of Strategies for Active Learning in Undergraduate Biology Education
Friday, 15 June 2018, starting at 8:30 a.m.
 
How Do You Carry Out Research in the Teaching Lab?
Friday, 15 June 2018, starting at 8:30 a.m.
 
3D Printing and Open Source Hardware Science Workshop
Friday, 15 June 2018, starting at 8:30 a.m.
 
Using Games to Teach Children Science
Friday, 15 June 2018, starting at 1:30 p.m.
 
Advanced Beer Tasting Course at Innovation Brew Works
Friday, 15 June 2018, starting at 1:30 p.m.
 
 
 



Examples of Strategies for Active Learning in Undergraduate Biology Education
Friday, 15 June, starting at 8:30 a.m.

Session length: 3 hours


Organized by: Julia Ruppell (Department of Biology, University of Portland, Portland, OR; ruppell@up.edu).

The process of engaging students in active learning is connected to positive learning outcomes. Many science departments in higher education are embracing this phenomenon by encouraging instructors to use more active learning in their courses. However, many instructors would benefit from increased knowledge of active learning methods and their usefulness for covering different content in their courses. Instructors benefit when they can learn from others about appropriate teaching strategies and methods along with their potential drawbacks, and this in turn benefits students. This workshop aims to engage faculty and students who are interested in promoting active learning in college science classrooms, especially for biology majors’ courses. Presenters will demonstrate active learning methods that they use, discuss what has worked well for their courses, discuss potential hurdles to utilizing active learning in undergraduate education and request feedback from participants. The information in the workshops will inform participants instructional decision-making and future research about active learning in college science courses.

Note: The organizer for this workshop is also organizing a symposium, Strategies for Active Learning in Undergraduate Biology Education. Click HERE for a description of this program.


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An Introduction to Grant Writing for Foundations
Thursday, 14 June, starting at 8:30 a.m.

Session length: 3 hours


Organized by: Peter L. Kraus (Associate Librarian, J. Willard Marriott Library, 295 S 1500 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112; peter.kraus@utah.edu).

Participants will review the process of writing effective grant applications and assembling a good proposal to foundations and charities. The basic components of a competitive grant proposal will be presented including the common pitfalls to avoid in grant writing and submission. Appropriate project funding sources will be discussed as well as establishing positive sponsor relationships, satisfying sponsor requirements, and the proposal review process.


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Active Learning in Quantitative Courses
Thursday, 14 June, starting at 1:30 p.m.

Session length: 3 hours


Organized by: Victoria Bhavsar (Director of Faculty Center & eLearning, Cal Poly Pomona; vbhavsar@cpp.edu) and Alison Baski (Dean of College of Science, Cal Poly Pomona).

Cal Poly Pomona, Cal State LA, and San Jose State University are collaborating to support faculty in incorporating significant active learning strategies into (i.e. flipping) introductory level quantitative courses including physics, calculus, programming, statics, and discrete mathematics. In this session, participants will select effective active learning strategies to achieve learning goals, draft specific activities, plan a class agenda to support their goals, and plan a course calendar to consistently incorporate active learning.

Note: The organizers for this workshop are also organizing a symposium, Multi-Disciplinary Experiences in Flipping Quantitative Course. Click HERE for a description of this program.


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How Do You Carry Out Research in the Teaching Lab?
Friday, 15 June, starting at 8:30 a.m.

Session length: 3 hours

Limited to 10 participants.

Organized by: Ben McFarland (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA; bjm@spu.edu).

Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are effective but complicated to implement. Transitioning your research from your graduate or post-doctoral experience into the undergraduate teaching laboratory poses specific challenges in terms of time, money, and student expertise. In this workshop, all participants will discuss the details of how we have brought authentic research experiences into undergraduate teaching labs so that we can learn from each other what has (and has not) worked.

Over the past decade, I have adapted three different multi-week projects from my post-doctoral research into undergraduate laboratory courses: a bioinformatics project to Biochemistry I, a protein production project to Biochemistry II, and a protein-protein interaction kinetics project to Survey of Physical Chemistry. For five years, I have used the GENI website (geni-science.org) to help organize the flow of information in large and small classes. GENI gives protocols to students and collects data from students, facilitating authentic research and publishable results.

In this workshop, scientists from all disciplines are welcome to discuss the details of our experiences with CUREs and with adapting research protocols to the undergraduate laboratory, with an eye toward making plans for future protocol adaptations. Topics for discussion include:

  • Scheduling research activities within limited, weekly lab periods;
  • Verifying student-collected data;
  • Evaluating and grading results (and reassuring anxious students); and
  • Responding to unexpected lab results.
Some online interactions with websites are planned as examples, so participants should bring laptops if possible.



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Using Games to Teach Children Science
Friday, 15 June, starting at 1:30 p.m.

Session length: 3 hours


Organized by: James M. Bower (Founder, Numedeon, Ashland, OR; jim@numedeon.com).

Current industry estimates suggest that 91% of all children in the United States, ages 2-17, play video games. At the same time, sales of even more traditional board games have grown by almost 30% over the last several years. We have become a nation of young gamers. While science has long recognized the connection between play and learning, this hands-on workshop will consider several specific efforts to use gaming technology to engage children in science.

To get maximum benefit from this workshop it is advised that attendees bring a laptop computer in order to go on-line and explore various web sites that will be referenced.


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Communicating Science to the Public: Setting Up speaking Clubs/Circles
Wednesday, 13 June, starting at 8:30 a.m.

Session length: 3 hours

Limited to 20 participants.

Organized by: Dennis F. Mangan (Director, Chalk Talk Science Project, Santa Rosa, CA; chalktalkscience@gmail.com).

The importance of good communication skills is well recognized. Scientists who can speak and write well have increased credibility, are more likely to get funding, are better teachers, have more impact on policy development, and feel more satisfied in their careers. Yet, many universities and research centers struggle to integrate communication skill-building into their educational curricula and career development for their faculty and technical staff.

This workshop is intended for students and faculty who want to set up a science communication learning program (i.e., speaking club/circle) at your home institution.

The workshop will:
• Highlight key aspects of good science communication to teach
• Show how to integrate science communication training into busy schedules
• Explain how to sustain a science communication training program
• Outline how to evaluate a successful program

Participants will be invited to join a network of science communication leaders to share novel approaches for learning science communication skills.


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3D Printing and Open Source Hardware Science Workshop
Friday, 15 June, starting at 8:30 a.m.

Session length: 3 hours


Organized by: Joan Horvath and Rich Cameron (Co-founders, Nonscriptum LLC, 155 N Lake Ave, Suite 800, Pasadena CA 91101; joan@nonscriptum.com).

Have you been wondering if you should be using 3D printing and open-source electronics in your own educational or scientific endeavors, but you didn't know where to start? Most scientists and teachers end up doing some DIY inventing along the way, but can you take it farther now that many technologies have plummeted in price? Organizers will frame the possibilities and walk through several technologies in depth, along with some case studies drawn from the projects that will be on display at the Maker Exchange. This three-hour workshop will be a compliment to the Scientific Maker Exchange and will be a deep dive into some of the technologies and projects on display.

8:30 – 9:30 Part I . Math and science visualization using 3D prints

This part of the workshop will start with a survey of good practices for creating 3D prints to model or visualize math/science concepts, with some case studies from the Maker Exchange exhibits. Then we will split into groups and discuss how to attack a few projects of interest. We will summarize lessons learned briefly at the end.

9:40 – 11:30 Part II: using Open Source Electronics

This part will start with a survey about what is possible with open source electronics (what kinds of processors and sensors are available, when you need a Raspberry Pi versus when you need an Arduino, how to store or transmit data, etc.) followed by a brief case study. We will then break into groups facilitated by some of the Maker Exchange presenters. The goal of the groups will be to facilitiate walking interested participants through the process of deciding whether a particular measurement is possible with open source parts, how to look up components, packaging and so on. We will summarize lessons learned at then end.


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A Hands-on Introduction to Wearable Fashion Electronics
Thursday, 14 June, starting at 1:30 p.m.

Session length: 3 hours


Organizer: Jawaharlal Mariappan (Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cal Poly, Pomona, CA; jmariappan@cpp.edu). Co-organizers: Cordelia Ontiveros (Campus Director, Project Lead The Way, and Professor, Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA), Kristina Rigden (Outreach Program Director, College of Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona), and Nicole Gutzke (Program Coordinator, Program Lead The Way and Women in Engineering, College of Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA).

Electronics has become an integral part of our life. Everything we use today has some form of electronics. Our cell phones and computers use powerful microprocessors, electronic components, and circuits. Basic electronics and circuitry is very important for all engineers, not just electrical engineers. However, learning about electronics and circuits is usually considered dry and boring. It does not have to be that way. One way to make teaching electronics interesting is by allowing students to design their own gadgets that they can wear and show off. Examples of such gadgets include the design of a tie that lights up, or an earring that displays changing bright colors. It may be a hair bow designed with bright color LEDs or a bike helmet that can change colors in the night. It may be a jacket with built-in GPS, or a dance costume, or, friendship bracelet that can talk. The possibilities are endless, and it is up to the imagination of students.

The objective of this workshop is to introduce the participants to the exciting field of wearable technology. In this workshop participants will learn how to create simple wearable gadgets using an Arduino compatible microcontroller, and accessories. This workshop is based on successfully implementing wearable technology at our K-12 outreach program, Femineers, as well as in our 100 and 200 level courses. The Femineers (Female engineers) program has been growing, and it has been adopted by over 30 schools. The Femineer program has been recognized by the White House in 2016 as one of the most influential programs for increasing educational outcomes and opportunities for female Hispanic K-12 students across the country.


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Advanced Beer Tasting Course at Innovation Brew Works
Friday, 15 June 2018, starting at 1:30 p.m. at Innovation Brew Works, 3650 W. Temple Ave., Pomona, CA

Session length: 3.5 hours
Fee: $59

Minimum number of enrollees: 12
Maximum number of enrollees: 36
If this workshop is cancelled due to low enrollment, the registration fee for it will be completely reimbursed to those already signed up.


Organized by: Brisa Blevins (Brewing Education Coordinator, Innovation Brew Works, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; beblevins@cpp.edu). Co-organized by: Melody Young (Manager, Innovation Brew Works, Cal Poly, Pomona, Pomona, CA; mpyoung@cpp.edu. Taught by: Taylor Lane (Lab Technician, Russian River Brewing Company, Santa Rosa, CA, and Instructor, Science of Beer Program, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; tlane73190@gmail.com)
Interview with Aaron Neilson, Director, Dining Services at Cal Poly Pomona
Innovation Brew Works Grand Opening
Inside Look at Innovation Brew Works
Innovation Brew Works Webpage: Innovation Brew Works

This workshop is designed to fit the needs of persons in various levels of craft beer knowledge. Topics include, beer flavor components, fermentation, food and beer pairing, beer flaws (detrimental microbiological activities that occur with a variety of beer flaws, at what point they occur, and the off-flavors they produce), and more. To ensure subject matters are understood to the fullest degree, beer tasting will be offered throughout the course. Upon completion, you are invited to stay in the brewery for a complimentary pint and snacks.

About the instructor: As a Lab Technician for Russian River Brewing Company in Santa Rosa, CA, and previously as the Quality Assurance Technician for Ritual Brewing Company in Redlands, CA, Taylor Lane has been responsible for conducting quality control protocols and developing standard operating procedures for Russian River Brewing Co. Her focus with Russian River includes sensory analysis, yeast management, microbiological methods, and maintenance of specification guidelines. Ms. Lane has also served as a Teaching Associate and supervised undergraduate and graduate level research projects for the Biology Department at Cal Poly Pamona. Taylor holds a Master of Science in Biology, with an emphasis in microbiology, from Cal Poly Pomona and a Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara.


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