99th Annual Meeting
Cal Poly Pomona
Pomona, California
June 12 - 15, 2018

 

SYMPOSIA



The following symposia are in various stages of planning for the annual meeting. The listings below are tentative and subject to change. New symposia will be added as information is received from the organizers. Check this web site regularly for updated information. Inquiries can be emailed to aaaspd@sou.edu. If you plan to attend the meeting largely for one symposium, please call 541–552–6869 to confirm its status before committing travel funds.

Please bookmark this page and check back frequently, as this information is frequently updated as new information becomes available. Abstracts for all of the presentations are expected to be available for downloading by the end of April, perhaps earlier.


Index To Symposia


(1) Strategies for Active Learning in Undergraduate Biology Education

(2) Library Science Symposium

(3) Recent Advances in Turbulence Research: Experiments, Theory, and Computations

(4) Linking Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling and Health Effects of Ozone and Particulate Matter with Improved Public Policy for Megacities

(5) The Intersection Between Science and Philosophy

(6) Active Learning Practices in Chemistry Courses

(7) Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Manufacturing and Applications

(8) Space Power Technologies - Thermoelectrics, Fuel Cells and Batteries



Symposium Descriptions


(1) Strategies for Active Learning in Undergraduate Biology Education. Organizer: Julia Ruppell (Department of Biology, University of Portland, Portland, OR; ruppell@up.edu).
Half-day program, scheduled for TBA.

The process of engaging students in active learning is connected to positive learning outcomes. Many science departments in higher education are embracing this phenomenon by encouraging instructors to use more active learning in their courses. However, many instructors would benefit from increased knowledge of active learning methods and their usefulness for covering different content in their courses. Instructors benefit when they can learn from others about appropriate teaching strategies and methods along with their potential drawbacks, and this in turn benefits students. This symposium aims to engage faculty and students who are interested in promoting active learning in college science classrooms, especially for biology majors’ courses. We will hear from different presenters about the methods they use, what has worked well for their courses and potential hurdles to utilizing active learning in undergraduate education. The information in the presentations can be applied to inform instructional decision-making and future research about active learning in college science courses.

ABSTRACTS: Should be available here for downloading in late April.

     


(2) Library Science Symposium. Organizers: Crystal Goldman (Geisel Library, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California; clgoldman@ucsd.edu), Zoe Pettway Unno (USC Libraries, Science and Engineering Library, Los Angeles, California; zunno@usc.edu), Paul Hottinger (University Library, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, California; prhottinger@cpp.edu), Amy Besnoy (Copley Library, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; abesnoy@sandiego.edu) and Frida Lin (University Library, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, California; fwlin@cpp.edu).
Full-day program, scheduled for TBA.

Library Science is a “discipline with primarily a practical aim” (Hjørland, 1999, p. 512). This does not transmute the fact that the field is grounded in fundamental theory and research. Practice-based research can relate to specific approaches to concrete problems at individual institutions, while theoretical research is more general in nature, can be applied to multiple library environments, and is not necessarily based on concrete practices (Audunson, 2007; Chow, Shaw, Gwynn, Martensen, & Howard, 2011; Hjørland, 1999). These methods of library research complement each other and work in tandem to enrich the discipline as a whole.

This symposium will focus on both the theory and practice of librarianship in academia, which invites an all-inclusive consideration of libraries and librarians in the learning environment. From case studies involving practice at specific institutions to abstract investigations addressing aspects of the discipline at large, this symposium intends to foster a dialogue on a variety of library issues, such as instruction, reference, collection development, digitization, scholarly communication, and library leadership and management.

ABSTRACTS: Should be available here for downloading in late April.

     


(3) Recent Advances in Turbulence Research: Experiments, Theory, and Computations. Organizers: Campbell Densmore (Mechanical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, California; cadinsmore@cpp.edu), Marko Princevac (Mechanical Engineering Department, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, California; marko@engr.ucr.edu), and Frank Jacobitz (Mechanical Engineering Department, Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering, University of San Diego, California; jacobitz@sandiego.eduu).
Full-day program, scheduled for TBA.

This symposium is a venue for the exchange of recent results in the field of turbulence research. Discussion topics will include geophysical turbulence, wildfire dynamics, and interactions between bubbles and turbulent flow fields, but any topics related to turbulence research are appropriate for this session. Geophysical turbulence concerns flow with shear, stratification, or rotation and with applications in the atmosphere or oceans, including turbulence evolution, transport, and mixing of natural or anthropogenic substances. Atmospheric flows and turbulence in large part govern fire dynamics. Additionally, the dissipation associated with bubble ladened turbulent flows will be discussed. Studies that involve laboratory or field experiments, theoretical analysis, as well as simulation approaches will be discussed. The organizers particularly encourage students at the undergraduate or graduate level to present their work in this symposium.

ABSTRACTS: Should be available here for downloading in late April.

     


(4) Linking Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling and Health Effects of Ozone and Particulate Matter with Improved Public Policy for Megacities. Organizers: William R. Stockwell (Desert Research Institute, Reno 89512; William.Stockwell@dri.edu) and Wendy S. Goliff (Cal Poly Pomona, Department of Civil Engineering, Pomona, California 91768; wsgoliff@cpp.edu).
Half-day program, scheduled for TBA.

Ozone and particulate matter are toxic components of the polluted urban atmosphere. These are formed through gas-phase chemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOC), other compounds and ultraviolet radiation. Air pollution policy makers develop strategies to reduce ozone and particulate matter concentrations that usually involve reducing the emissions of NOx and VOC. Computer simulations involving emission scenarios, atmospheric chemistry and meteorology are used to evaluate the potential effectiveness of emission reduction strategies. Governmental agencies develop strategies to improve air quality based on atmospheric chemistry knowledge and modeling that usually involve reductions of NOx and VOC emissions. Recently new tools have been developed that relate air quality simulations with health effects and economic impacts. We solicit speakers who will present policy relevant new research on atmospheric chemistry, air quality modeling and the impact of poor air quality on health and the economy.

ABSTRACTS: Should be available here for downloading in late April.

     


(5) The Intersection Between Science and Philosophy. Organizer: Sarah Roe (Department of Philosophy, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, Connecticut 06515; roes1@southernct.edu).
Full day program, scheduled for TBA.

In recent times, the information revolution, nanotechnology, genetic engineering, remarkable medical breakthroughs, and other STEM-related developments have changed the way we think about science. Advancements in the sciences pose an ever-present and ever-evolving set of questions about the world and our place within it. Although these questions may not yet have answers, the topic of the proposed session promotes dialogue between scientists, philosophers and historians in an attempt to merge field specific knowledge and broader contextual knowledge. Only through an interdisciplinary approach can we begin to recognize the role of science in our society.

ABSTRACTS: Should be available here for downloading in late April.

     


(6) Active Learning Practices in Chemistry Courses. Organizer: Yan Lui (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State Polytechnic University Pomona, California; yanl@cpp.edu).
Half day program, scheduled for TBA.

Learning is never a passive process; one-way flow of information from instructor to students will never make student learning productive and successful. Research indicates that students perform better when they actively participate in all class activities. For example, problem-solving exercises which are a common type of active learning practice used in lecture courses can develop individual’s critical thinking capability; while group exercises may develop leadership and collaborative skills. On the other hand, inquiry-based project modules which are an important active learning practice in laboratory courses require students to think and act like scientists in a real-world setting. It is very important for instructors to create an active learning environment for students. Enhancing their learning and preparing them for their professional careers are the ultimate goal of active learning practice implementation. To date many active learning practices have successfully been incorporated in Chemistry courses. This symposium is to provide a platform for educators in Chemistry to communicate the active learning practices in their classes. Faculty in all disciplines of chemistry from public schools to private schools are all invited to give presentations on active learning practices.

ABSTRACTS: Should be available here for downloading in late April.

     


(7) Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Manufacturing and Applications. Organizer: Jenny Zhen Yu (Electrical and Computer Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, California; zhenyu@cpp.edu). Co-organizers: Haamun Kalaantari (Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, California; hkalaantari@cpp.edu) and Vilupanur A. Ravi (Chemical and Materials Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, California; vravi@cpp.edu).
Half day program, scheduled for TBA.

This symposium will provide a platform for researchers in the field of nanomaterial synthesis, manufacturing and applications to present their work. Topics include low cost and robust manufacturing processes; nanoscale imaging technology; and application of nanotechnology to wireless communication; application of nanotechnology to environmental issues; medical applications of nanotechnology and power generation and storage.

ABSTRACTS: Should be available here for downloading in late April.

     


(8) Space Power Technologies - Thermoelectrics, Fuel Cells and Batteries. Organizer: Billy Li (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California; Billy.Chun-Yip.Li@jpl.nasa.gov). Co-organizers: Jean-Pierre Fleurial (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California; Jean-Pierre.Fleurial@jpl.nasa.gov), Erik Brandon (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California; Erik.J.Brandon@jpl.nasa.gov), and Vilupanur A. Ravi (Chemical and Materials Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, California; vravi@cpp.edu).
Full day program, scheduled for TBA.

The power needs of spacecraft can be met in different ways, e.g., solar (photovoltaics), fuel cells, batteries, and radioisotopes. The latter incorporate thermoelectric devices to facilitate thermal-to-electrical power conversion. In this symposium, presentations will address all aspects of space power including materials, processing, devices and performance.

ABSTRACTS: Should be available here for downloading in late April.

     






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