99th Annual Meeting
Cal Poly Pomona
Pomona, California
June 12 - 15, 2018

 

SYMPOSIA



The following symposia are in various stages of planning for the annual meeting. The listings below are tentative and subject to change. New symposia will be added as information is received from the organizers. Check this web site regularly for updated information. Inquiries can be emailed to aaaspd@sou.edu. If you plan to attend the meeting largely for one symposium, please call 541–552–6869 to confirm its status before committing travel funds.

Please bookmark this page and check back frequently, as this information is frequently updated as new information becomes available. Abstracts for all of the presentations are expected to be available for downloading by the end of April, perhaps earlier.


Index to Symposia and Workshops by Sponsoring Sections
Click above for complete listing by sponsoring section



Index To Symposia By Name

Scroll down for descriptions and abstracts



(1) Recent Advances in Turbulence Research: Experiments, Theory, and Computations

(2) Unmanned Aerial Systems: Advancing Technology and Applications

(3) Rocket Propulsion

(4) Advances in Engineering Education

(5) Renewable Energy and Thermal Science: Materials, Design, and Applications

(6) Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Manufacturing and Applications

(7) Space Power Technologies - Thermoelectrics, Fuel Cells and Batteries

(8) Polymer Synthesis and Processing for Advanced and Emerging Applications

(9) Medical and Dental Implants – Materials, Stability and Compatibility

(10) Strategies for Active Learning in Undergraduate Biology Education

(11) Active Learning Practices in Chemistry Courses

(12) Library Science Symposium

(13a) The Intersection Between Science and Philosophy: Medical Advancements, Values in Science, and Ethical Concerns

(13b) The Intersection Between Science and Philosophy: Rethinking Some Fundamental Aspects of Science

(14) Linking Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling and Health Effects of Ozone and Particulate Matter with Improved Public Policy for Megacities

(15) Saving the Planet One Course at a Time

(16) La Brea Tar Pits: Old Bones and New Insights

(17) Pharmaceutical Research and Development: From Bench to Patient-centered Care

(18) Multi-Disciplinary Experiences in Flipping Quantitative Courses

(19) Vietnam: Cultural Legacy, Crisis of Immigration, Current United States and Vietnam Policies, and an American Anthropologist in the Vietnam War

(20) Smart Grid, Micro Grid Technologies and Cyber Security Issues in a Complex Grid System

(21) Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Process – Structure – Property Relationships

(22) Creativity, Imagination, and Design in STEM Education

(23) The Practice, Ethics, and Communication of Interdisciplinary Research

(24) Structural Engineering Advancements for Earthquake Resistance

(25) Implications of Foodborne Pathogens for Agriculture

(26) Corrosion and Protective Coatings

(27) Microbiome in the Environment, Health and Disease

(28) Exploring Public Facets of Science and Technology Studies

(29) Political Consequences of Framing Issues





Symposium Descriptions

(1) Recent Advances in Turbulence Research: Experiments, Theory, and Computations. Organizers: Campbell Densmore (Mechanical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; cadinsmore@cpp.edu), Marko Princevac (Mechanical Engineering Department, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA; marko@engr.ucr.edu), and Frank Jacobitz (Mechanical Engineering Department, Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering, University of San Diego, CA; jacobitz@sandiego.edu).
Full-day program, currently scheduled for Wednesday, 13 June.

This symposium is a venue for the exchange of recent results in the field of turbulence research. Discussion topics will include geophysical turbulence, wildfire dynamics, and interactions between bubbles and turbulent flow fields, but any topics related to turbulence research are appropriate for this session. Geophysical turbulence concerns flow with shear, stratification, or rotation and with applications in the atmosphere or oceans, including turbulence evolution, transport, and mixing of natural or anthropogenic substances. Atmospheric flows and turbulence in large part govern fire dynamics. Additionally, the dissipation associated with bubble ladened turbulent flows will be discussed. Studies that involve laboratory or field experiments, theoretical analysis, as well as simulation approaches will be discussed. The organizers particularly encourage students at the undergraduate or graduate level to present their work in this symposium.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            

(2) Unmanned Aerial Systems: Advancing Technology and Applications. Organizers: Subodh Bhandari (Aerospace Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; sbhandari@cpp.edu), Navid Nakhjiri (Aerospace Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; nnakhjiri@cpp.edu), and Zahra Sotoudeh (Aerospace Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; zsotoudeh@cpp.edu).
Full-day program, currently scheduled for Thursday, 14 June.

This Symposium will focus on increased autonomy of unmanned aerial systems (UASs) and their widespread applications. Despite their potential use for many applications, they have not yet seen widespread usage. The lack of sufficient level of autonomy has prevented the mass deployment of UASs for many applications such as agriculture, search and rescue, traffic monitoring, package delivery, etc. The Symposium topics of interest include robust, nonlinear, and intelligent flight controls, collision and obstacle avoidance, command and control of multiple unmanned systems, coordination between multiple unmanned systems, navigation in GPS-denied environment, energy harvesting and increased endurance, and application of these systems for widespread usages.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(3) Rocket Propulsion. Organizers: Frank Chandler (California State Polytechnic University Pomona, Pomona, CA; fochandler@cpp.edu) and Eric Schmidt (Exquadrum, Inc, Adelanto, CA; Eric.Schmidt@exquadrum.com).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, 13 June.

Rocket Propulsion Development: This half-day session will be a compilation of current relevant research in the area of Rocket Propulsion. This will include work done in both liquid and solid propellants that are currently being investigated by several rocket company researchers. A few projects are being performed at local test sites and government facilities in the region.

Liquid Rocket Laboratory Projects: This half-day session will discuss the newly developed Liquid Rocket Laboratory at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona and its capabilities. Also highlighted will be several student research projects related to rocket engines and launch vehicle developments. This set of presentations will discuss the analytical development of the technologies related to liquid rocket engines and the development of the hardware designs that are being built by student and local manufacturing concerns.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(4) Advances in Engineering Education. Organizer: Mariappan Jawaharlal (Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; jmariappan@cpp.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Thursday afternoon, 14 June.

Engineering education is experiencing transformative changes. Changes have been taking place not only in the field of technology but also in pedagogical approaches. Engaging students through short interactions seem to be gaining popularity. Students often turn to online resources for help than reaching out to their professors. This symposium aims to addresses these critical issues. It seeks to contributions in topics that include, but not limited to, innovative pedagogy, online learning, flipped classrooms, MOOC, new trends, and use of technology in enhancing education.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(5) Renewable Energy and Thermal Science: Materials, Design, and Applications. Organizer: Reza Baghaei Lakeh (Mechanical Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; rblakeh@cpp.edu). Co-organizers: Maryam Shafahi (Mechanical Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; mshafahi@cpp.edu) and Kevin Anderson (Mechanical Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; kranderson1@cpp.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Friday afternoon, June 15.

This symposium aims to showcase recent advancements in the area of renewable energy systems and thermal fluids engineering. The symposium welcomes presentations in all areas of renewable energy, including but not limited to solar-thermal, solar-photovoltaics, wind, geothermal, wave, thermal energy storage, and compressed are energy storage. The presentations are expected to focus on component-level and system-level design, material properties, and heat transfer behavior of renewable energy systems.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(6) Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Manufacturing and Applications. Organizer: Jenny Zhen Yu (Electrical and Computer Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; zhenyu@cpp.edu). Co-organizers: Haamun Kalaantari (Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; hkalaantari@cpp.edu) and Vilupanur A. Ravi (Chemical and Materials Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; vravi@cpp.edu).
Half day program, currently scheduled for Thursday morning, 14 June.

This symposium will provide a platform for researchers in the field of nanomaterial synthesis, manufacturing and applications to present their work. Topics include low cost and robust manufacturing processes; nanoscale imaging technology; and application of nanotechnology to wireless communication; application of nanotechnology to environmental issues; medical applications of nanotechnology and power generation and storage.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(7) Space Power Technologies - Thermoelectrics, Fuel Cells and Batteries. Organizer: Billy Li (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Billy.Chun-Yip.Li@jpl.nasa.gov). Co-organizers: Jean-Pierre Fleurial (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Jean-Pierre.Fleurial@jpl.nasa.gov), Erik Brandon (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Erik.J.Brandon@jpl.nasa.gov), and Vilupanur A. Ravi (Chemical and Materials Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; vravi@cpp.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Friday morning, 15 June.

The power needs of spacecraft can be met in different ways, e.g., solar (photovoltaics), fuel cells, batteries, and radioisotopes. The latter incorporate thermoelectric devices to facilitate thermal-to-electrical power conversion. In this symposium, presentations will address all aspects of space power including materials, processing, devices and performance.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            

(8) Polymer Synthesis and Processing for Advanced and Emerging Applications. Organizers: J. B. Puthoff (California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; jbputhoff@cpp.edu), Farhana Abedin (Electromechanical Engineering Technology, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, Pomona, CA; fabedin@cpp.edu), and K. Forward (California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; kmforward@cpp.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Wednesday morning, 13 June.

Polymers possess many properties that make them suitable as the preferred materials in a number of engineered structures and components. However, they also possess properties – for instance, those related to their processability – that enable their use in advanced systems incorporating fibers, membranes, nanostructures, surface modifications, pharmaceutical delivery, smart components, biomedical scaffold structures and adhesives, etc. This symposium will present recent developments in the fabrication of polymers for use in advanced and emerging applications.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(9) Medical and Dental Implants – Materials, Stability and Compatibility. Organizers: Vilupanur Ravi (Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; vravi@cpp.edu) and Ichiro Nishimura (UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA; inishimura@dentistry.ucla.edu).
Full-day program, currently scheduled for Wednesday, 13 June.

The rapid aging of the human population is posing unprecedented issues in regards to their medical and dental needs, e.g., the need for longer-lasting implants. In addition, the problems of infection following surgical procedures and the possibility of implant rejection by the body need to be solved. Modern implants need to address these issues, and in this symposium issues such as material compatibility both in terms of mechanical properties and environmental stability, osseointegration, etc., will be explored. Other areas of interest include implant materials and design, implant selection for structural and functional needs.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(10) Strategies for Active Learning in Undergraduate Biology Education. Organizer: Julia Ruppell (Department of Biology, University of Portland, Portland, OR; ruppell@up.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Thursday afternoon, 14 June.

The process of engaging students in active learning is connected to positive learning outcomes. Many science departments in higher education are embracing this phenomenon by encouraging instructors to use more active learning in their courses. However, many instructors would benefit from increased knowledge of active learning methods and their usefulness for covering different content in their courses. Instructors benefit when they can learn from others about appropriate teaching strategies and methods along with their potential drawbacks, and this in turn benefits students. This symposium aims to engage faculty and students who are interested in promoting active learning in college science classrooms, especially for biology majors’ courses. We will hear from different presenters about the methods they use, what has worked well for their courses and potential hurdles to utilizing active learning in undergraduate education. The information in the presentations can be applied to inform instructional decision-making and future research about active learning in college science courses.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(11) Active Learning Practices in Chemistry Courses. Organizer: Yan Lui (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State Polytechnic University Pomona, CA; yanl@cpp.edu).
Half day program, currently scheduled for Friday afternoon, 15 June.

Learning is never a passive process; one-way flow of information from instructor to students will never make student learning productive and successful. Research indicates that students perform better when they actively participate in all class activities. For example, problem-solving exercises which are a common type of active learning practice used in lecture courses can develop individual’s critical thinking capability; while group exercises may develop leadership and collaborative skills. On the other hand, inquiry-based project modules which are an important active learning practice in laboratory courses require students to think and act like scientists in a real-world setting. It is very important for instructors to create an active learning environment for students. Enhancing their learning and preparing them for their professional careers are the ultimate goal of active learning practice implementation. To date many active learning practices have successfully been incorporated in Chemistry courses. This symposium is to provide a platform for educators in Chemistry to communicate the active learning practices in their classes. Faculty in all disciplines of chemistry from public schools to private schools are all invited to give presentations on active learning practices.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(12) Library Science Symposium. Organizers: Crystal Goldman (Geisel Library, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA; clgoldman@ucsd.edu), Zoe Pettway Unno (USC Libraries, Science and Engineering Library, Los Angeles, CA; zunno@usc.edu), Paul Hottinger (University Library, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; prhottinger@cpp.edu), Amy Besnoy (Copley Library, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; abesnoy@sandiego.edu) and Frida Lin (University Library, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; fwlin@cpp.edu).
Full-day program, currently scheduled for Wednesday, 13 June.

Library Science is a “discipline with primarily a practical aim" (Hjørland, 1999, p. 512). This does not transmute the fact that the field is grounded in fundamental theory and research. Practice-based research can relate to specific approaches to concrete problems at individual institutions, while theoretical research is more general in nature, can be applied to multiple library environments, and is not necessarily based on concrete practices (Audunson, 2007; Chow, Shaw, Gwynn, Martensen, & Howard, 2011; Hjørland, 1999). These methods of library research complement each other and work in tandem to enrich the discipline as a whole.

This symposium will focus on both the theory and practice of librarianship in academia, which invites an all-inclusive consideration of libraries and librarians in the learning environment. From case studies involving practice at specific institutions to abstract investigations addressing aspects of the discipline at large, this symposium intends to foster a dialogue on a variety of library issues, such as instruction, reference, collection development, digitization, scholarly communication, and library leadership and management.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(13a) The Intersection Between Science and Philosophy: Medical Advancements, Values in Science, and Ethical Concerns. Organizer: Sarah Roe (Department of Philosophy, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT; roes1@southernct.edu).
Half day program, currently scheduled for Wednesday morning, 13 June.

In recent times, the information revolution, nanotechnology, genetic engineering, remarkable medical breakthroughs, and other STEM-related developments have changed the way we think about science. Advancements in the sciences pose an ever-present and ever-evolving set of questions about the world and our place within it. The topic of this symposium focuses on medical advancements, values within science, and ethical concerns. More specifically, we will engage with the following areas and topics:

  • Feminist values in scientific practice;
  • The ethics regarding rapidly advancing medical technologies;
  • Evolutionary medicine;
  • Social attitudes regarding medicine and vaccinations;
  • Drug development and biomedicine;
  • Gendered models of the body;
  • Bias and values in biological research and practice; and
  • Offer insight on how scientists might approach ethical concerns.
ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(13b) The Intersection Between Science and Philosophy: Rethinking Some Fundamental Aspects of Science. Organizer: Sarah Roe (Department of Philosophy, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT; roes1@southernct.edu).
Half day program, currently scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, 13 June.

Advancements in scientific modeling, research and practices bring about an ever-evolving set of questions about the epistemic and pragmatic aims of scientific research. Although these questions may not yet have answers, the topic of this session promotes dialogue between scientists, philosophers and historians in an attempt to merge field specific knowledge and broader contextual knowledge. The topic of this symposium focuses on rethinking some fundamental aspects of science, such as the epistemic and pragmatic aims of scientific research, common scientific practices, and types of experimentation. More specifically, we will engage with the following areas and topics:

  • Important epistemic challenges, such as integrating indigenous and Western knowledge;
  • The important role ignorance plays in science;
  • Biomimetic systems, or man-made systems that are modeled after natural systems;
  • The notion of accuracy and its role in memory science;
  • Successes and failures of climate models;
  • Epistemic and pragmatic aims of scientific research; and
  • Expanding the types of experiment within community ecology.
ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            



(14) Linking Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling and Health Effects of Ozone and Particulate Matter with Improved Public Policy for Megacities. Organizers: William R. Stockwell (Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV; William.Stockwell@dri.edu) and Wendy S. Goliff (Department of Civil Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; wsgoliff@cpp.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Thursday morning, 14 June.

Ozone and particulate matter are toxic components of the polluted urban atmosphere. These are formed through gas-phase chemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOC), other compounds and ultraviolet radiation. Air pollution policy makers develop strategies to reduce ozone and particulate matter concentrations that usually involve reducing the emissions of NOx and VOC. Computer simulations involving emission scenarios, atmospheric chemistry and meteorology are used to evaluate the potential effectiveness of emission reduction strategies. Governmental agencies develop strategies to improve air quality based on atmospheric chemistry knowledge and modeling that usually involve reductions of NOx and VOC emissions. Recently new tools have been developed that relate air quality simulations with health effects and economic impacts. We solicit speakers who will present policy relevant new research on atmospheric chemistry, air quality modeling and the impact of poor air quality on health and the economy.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(15) Saving the Planet One Course at a Time. Organizer: Jeff Passe (Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; jpasse@cpp.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, 13 June.

A panel of scholars at Cal Poly Pomona are addressing issues of sustainability in a variety of ways – through studying food justice issues in Ethnic and Women Studies, developing educators for sustainability in teacher education courses, creating and managing student farms as community service, examining intergenerational learning in critical food systems courses as part of Liberal Studies, and studying environmental apparel and food issues as part of a Science Technology and Society major. Each presenter will provide a brief overview and then engage the attendees in participatory model lessons related to the goals of their respective courses and programs.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(16) La Brea Tar Pits: Old Bones and New Insights. Organizer: Donald R. Prothero (Geological Sciences, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; donaldprothero@att.net).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Thursday morning, 14 June.

The tar seeps at Rancho La Brea in Los Angeles are world famous for their enormous numbers of fossils from the last 40,000 years of the Ice Ages. Over 3 million fossils have been collected, with at least 59 mammalian species and 133 bird species, as well as plants, insects, mollusks, and many other groups. These deposits were first extensively collected about century ago, yet many new specimens are being found every day. More importantly, new techniques and new theoretical insights have allowed us to discover even more surprises about evolution and life in the late Pleistocene. Some of these more recent studies include functional morphology of spectacular animals like saber-toothed cats and dire wolves, examination of patterns in evolution of the major climate change of the last glacial-interglacial cycle, and using the large number of juvenile bones to look at patterns of growth in many different mammals. In addition, many DNA and molecular phylogenetic studies have been conducted on living and extinct mammals (including La Brea mammals), giving surprising results. All of these recent developments and more will be discussed in this symposium, allowing the casual scientific listener to be updated about the exciting new insights that are being gleaned about evolution and developmental biology, as well as the climate of the late Pleistocene. This symposium will feature both professionals who have worked on La Brea for many years as well as a number of students who have just begun their research careers with projects at La Brea.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(17) Pharmaceutical Research and Development: From Bench to Patient-centered Care. Organizer: Jozef Stec (Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Marshall B. Ketchum University, Fullerton, CA; JStec@ketchum.edu). Co-organizers: Eva Wong (Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Marshall B. Ketchum University, Fullerton, CA; EWong@ketchum.edu), Charitha Madiraju (Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Marshall B. Ketchum University, Fullerton, CA; CMadiraju@ketchum.edu), and Ronny Priefer (Department of Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Western New England University, Springfield, MA; ronny.priefer@wne.edu).
Full day program, currently scheduled for Wednesday, 13 June.

The proposed symposium has an interdisciplinary nature and will include a variety of topics representing: pharmaceutical research and development, contemporary pharmacy practice, and patient-centered care. This symposium is an excellent opportunity to learn about pharmaceutical research and engage in the dialogue on the impact of pharmaceutical discovery on contemporary pharmacy and patient care.

Student pharmacists will showcase results from a wide range of research areas on effective treatment of known and/or emerging diseases. The discussed topics will highlight the "translational" component of pharmaceutical research, i.e. how fundamental research discoveries can be utilized in the clinic to ultimately improve patient care. Novel evidence-based approaches to patient-centered pharmaceutical care are especially welcome for presentation at the symposium. Diversity of the presentation topics will allow for open discussion and networking among all attendees.

This symposium provides an excellent opportunity for oral presentations by students currently enrolled in Colleges/Schools of Pharmacy. Qualified abstracts relating to bench, translational, and clinical research in areas of broad pharmaceutical sciences and pharmacy practice will be accepted for conference presentation. Accepted abstracts will fall into one of two categories: PharmD track (if presenting author is a PharmD student) or PhD track (if presenting author is a graduate student within a College/School of Pharmacy). Presenting students will automatically enter the presentation competition to win one of two awards, sponsored by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP). The two winners will receive reimbursement of up to $1000 to cover the cost of attendance at any AACP conference.

Download a flyer for this symposium that can be printed and posted to circulate notice of this opportunity.

Download a flyer for the contributed paper and poster sessions that are also being sponsored by the Pharmaceutical Sciences Section and are open for all levels of participation.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(18) Multi-Disciplinary Experiences in Flipping Quantitative Courses. Organizers: Alison Baski (Dean of College of Science, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA) and Victoria Bhavsar (Director of Faculty Center & eLearning, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; vbhavsar@cpp.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Thursday morning, 14 June.

Cal Poly Pomona, Cal State LA, and San Jose State University are collaborating to support faculty in incorporating significant active learning strategies into (i.e. flipping) introductory level quantitative courses including physics, calculus, programming, statics, and discrete mathematics. This session will include learning outcomes data, reports on how the cross-campus collaboration was achieved, and reports from faculty on strategies to successfully flip courses.

Note: The organizers for this symposium are also organizing a workshop, Active Learning in Quantitative Courses. Click here for a full description of this workshop.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(19) Vietnam: Cultural Legacy, Crisis of Immigration, Current United States and Vietnam Policies, and an American Anthropologist in the Vietnam War. Organizer: Alan L. Bain (National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution; baina@si.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Thursday afternoon, 14 June.

This session illuminates issues relating to culture, identity, nationalism, diaspora, and United States relations with Vietnam. With the defeat of the French in 1954 by the Viet-Minh and the support of the United States for the Republic of Viet Nam, Vietnam became a central United States issue. Beyond American protests, student violence, and the clash between political and military attempts at victory, the complexity of ideas and people, culture and migration, was now part of the wider American historical story. This session views what transpired within and outside Vietnam from four different perspectives: (1) The role of cultural heritage in establishing identity and pride in the Democratic Republic of Viet Nam from 1945 to 1975 and 1975 to the present. The emergent conflicts between preserving cultural heritage and development of the country are examined; (2) War and conflict causes migration. Vietnamese migrants settled in Berlin. Some were undocumented. What transpired and how the Vietnamese immigrants viewed their situation and their rights within the city is diagnosed through the use of ethnographic studies and oral histories in Sweden, Poland, and Germany; (3) Vietnam has become an important trade partner with the United States. There is increased economic and strategic cooperation between the two nations. Still, Vietnam and its Communist Party have a dismal human rights record, basic freedoms do not exist, and there is no independent judiciary. How the United States Congress reacts to U. S. and Vietnam relations in context with Vietnam’s human rights issues will be reviewed; and (4) An American doctoral anthropology student in Paris becomes interested in Vietnamese ethnography and is invited to carry out research in South Vietnam at the end of the French-Indochina War. For the next eighteen-years he lives in Vietnam, carries out research for government related agencies and the military, and becomes part of the Vietnam War. His story, what happened to his personal papers and the attempts to augment his record will be discussed.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(20) Smart Grid, Micro Grid Technologies and Cyber Security Issues in a Complex Grid System. Organizers: Sean Monemi (Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; ssmonemi@cpp.edu) and Tim Lin (Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; hlin@cpp.edu).
Half-day program, currentlly scheduled for Friday morning, 15 June.

Smart Grid concept refers to modernization of the electricity delivery system so that it monitors, protects and automatically optimizes the operation of its interconnected components, from the central and distributed generator through the high-voltage network and distribution system, to industrial users and building automation systems, to energy storage installations and to end-use consumers and their thermostats, electric vehicles, appliances and other household devices. Smart Grid in large, sits at the intersection of Energy, IT and Telecommunication Technologies. As the flow of electricity from utility to consumer becomes a two-way conversation, important issues are considered such as saving consumers’ money, energy, delivering more transparency in terms of end-user use, and reducing carbon emissions. One the characteristics of the smart grid technology is its ability to store large data sizes, including insertion of Intelligent Electronic Devices (IED) in power grid network, which rises concerns to issues such as vulnerability and cyber security attacks.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(21) Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Process – Structure – Property Relationships. Organizers: Samad Firdosy (Materials Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA) and Douglas C. Hofmann (Materials Development and Manufacturing Technology Group, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; dch@jpl.nasa.gov).
Full-day program, currently scheduled for Thursday, 14 June.

Additive manufacturing (AM) is a method of building a part up layer by layer from powder, wire or foil stock, typically using laser, electron beam or friction to supply energy for consolidation of each layer. The benefits of AM as compared to traditional machining include high level of complexity, reduction of parts counts by printing of entire assemblies in single pieces, rapid prototyping and cost effective production of customized parts (i.e. implants tailored to fit individuals of varying geometry). AM of metals is a relatively new and fast evolving technology that offers a potential paradigm shift in manufacturing for a range of industries. This forum will be used to communicate current research and development activities related to AM processing and resultant materials structure / property relationships of engineering alloys as well as novel alloys.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(22) Creativity, Imagination, and Design in STEM Education. Organizer: Carl A. Maida (University of California, Los Angeles, CA; cmaida@ucla.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Thursday afternoon, 14 June.

Currently, there is renewed interest in science and the creative imagination. A National Science Foundation workshop on the design of creativity support tools recommended ongoing efforts to: evolve existing and develop new theories of creativity grounded in a deep understanding of creativity; identify the fundamental role of creativity in all disciplines; emphasize education and learning by doing with higher expectations that course projects result in innovative products and discoveries; and help students develop creative “habits of mind,” for example, willingness to take risks and persevere when things go wrong. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi views creativity as “when a person...has a new idea or sees a new pattern and when this novelty is selected by the appropriate field for inclusion in the relevant domain.” He developed the concept of flow, a state of mind in which an individual is performing skilled work at an appropriate level of challenge between anxiety and boredom. For him, it is the “combination of empathy with the living world and a predilection for risk and adventure that leads to a creative involvement with the life sciences.”

Gerald Holton viewed the primacy of the scientist’s imagination in coming upon a new insight or theory. This link between imagination and innovation is a core premise of the University of Pennsylvania’s Imagination Institute, that “creativity relies on imagination, the conscious representation of what is not immediately present to the senses.” The act of imagining in science and other pursuits requires associative thinking, when the mind is free to wander and make connections across seemingly unrelated ideas. To this end, molecular biologist and Nobel laureate, François Jacob talks about two faces of science: “day science,” including laboratories, experiments and seminars, and “night science,” a world made up of doubt, intuition, and the imagination. Jacob understands innovative science as emerging from “a jumble of untidy efforts, of attempts born of a passion to understand.”

With the goal of developing creative habits of mind, many universities are emphasizing creativity in their curricula, Stanford University requires incoming students to take a course in "creative expression" as part of its general-education curriculum. Students at Carnegie Mellon University’s Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences satisfy a "creating" requirement by producing a painting, poem, musical performance, piece of technology, or design an experiment or mathematical proof. At North Carolina State University, members of co-curricular dance troupes, composed mostly of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) majors, view their work in dance and science as complementary, as each emphasizes data-driven techniques, and requires long hours, continuous improvement, and teamwork. The recently established Tsai Center for Innovative Thinking at Yale will provide opportunities for students “to develop the skills crucial to an innovative mindset: design thinking, problem-framing, creative synthesis, clear communication, and refined judgment.” An entire university, The New School in New York, has embraced creativity through design as a comprehensive approach to learning; the vision statement, reads: “...a university where design and social research drive approaches to studying issues of our time, such as democracy, urbanization, technological change, economic empowerment, sustainability, migration, and globalization...(an) intellectual and creative center for effective engagement in a world that increasingly demands better-designed objects, communication, systems, and organizations to meet social needs.” As with all creative processes, design is involved at every step. Design educators Richard Buchanan and Victor Margolin point out that key to the contemporary discovery of design is “a recognition that design exists as the central feature of culture and everyday life in many parts of the world.” Further, they assert: “discovering design…encourages individuals from different disciplines to reflect on design as the place where theory and practice meet for productive purposes.”

With a goal of multidisciplinary dialogue in mind, this session will focus on the role of creativity, design and the imagination in STEM and combine didactic and reflective ac-tivities to engage audience members, including teachers and informal science educators, and presenters in a professional learning community experience. The intent is to provide an opportunity for collaborative inquiry and a dialogue on how best to promote creativity and to design deeper learning approaches to STEM in the classroom and beyond. Panelists in roundtable format will discuss current issues and future trends in creativity and design in STEM education, including engaging students in authentic STEM research; integrating creativity into the STEM curriculum; and teacher adoption of educational innovations to teach STEM creatively.

References:
Buchanan and Victor Margolin, editors. Discovering Design: Explorations in Design Studies. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1995.
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Innovation. New York: Harper-Collins, 1996.
Gerald Holton. The Scientific Imagination. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.
François Jacob. Of Flies, Mice and Men. Translated by Giselle Weiss. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.
“The Birth of the Operon,” Science, 332: Issue 6031, 767, May 13, 2011.
Shneiderman, Gerhard Fischer et al. “Creativity Support Tools: Report from a U.S. National Science Foundation Sponsored Workshop,” International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction 20:2, 61-77, 2006.


SCHEDULE and ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(23) The Practice, Ethics, and Communication of Interdisciplinary Research. Organizers: Eman Ghanem (Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Honor Society, P.O. Box 13975, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709; eghanem@sigmaxi.org), Jonathan Clark (Weber State University, Department of Zoology, Weber State University, 1415 Edvalson Street, Ogden UT 84408; jclark1@weber.edu), Linda Mantel (Portland State University, 1511 SW Park Avenue, Apt 1302, Portland, OR 97201; crablady@teleport.com), Paul Stein (2313 W. San Lorenzo Avenue, Santa Ana, CA 92704; steinpm@hotmail.com), and Subrata Saha (University of Washington, 14014 38th Avenue NE, Seattle, WA 98125; sahas2@u.washington.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Thursday afternoon, 14 June.

Interdisciplinary research requires collaboration between individuals or research teams from two or more distinct disciplines, which integrates the theoretical and experimental frameworks of those disciplines. Breakthroughs in complex research areas such as climate change, public health, and artificial intelligence make a strong case for investigations that integrate multiple research disciplines. However, researchers must overcome obstacles when pursuing these types of projects due to a lack of interdisciplinary engagement, funding sources, and appropriate publication outlets. Similarly, researchers face challenges related to variability among professional recognition practices, differing social and work cultures, and conflicting priorities among research institutions. This symposium will cover topics related to the practice and challenges of interdisciplinary research including recognition, funding, and publications. Ethical considerations related to training, conduct, and multi-institutional research collaborations will also be explored. The symposium will conclude with a panel discussion on effective communication of interdisciplinary research, including internal communication among collaborators and external communication to broader audiences. The session will reflect on the value of membership in multidisciplinary scientific organizations such as Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Honor Society and AAAS as platforms for interdisciplinary and other types of research collaborations.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(24) Structural Engineering Advancements for Earthquake Resistance. Organizer: Felipe J. Perez (Department of Civil Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; fperez@cpp.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Thursday morning, 14 June.

Earthquakes have significantly impacted many cities around the globe. The last major earthquake to strike the Los Angeles area was the Northridge earthquake of January 17, 1994. This seismic event resulted in billions of dollars in property damage and in the loss of life. In response to the need for safer structures, research efforts aimed at mitigating the deleterious effect of earthquakes on structures continue. This symposium explores advancements in structural engineering for earthquake resistance. These advancements may include, but are not limited to, the development of new seismic structural systems; retrofit techniques for existing structures; new methodologies for earthquake-resistant design; instrumentation for post-earthquake assessment of structures; and reconnaissance reports on structural performance from recent earthquakes. Student researchers, faculty, and working professionals are invited to participate.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(25) Implications of Foodborne Pathogens for Agriculture. Organizers: Shelton E. Murinda (Don B. Huntley College of Agriculture, California State Polytechnic University, 3801 W. Temple Ave, Pomona, CA; semurinda@cpp.edu) and A. Mark Ibekwe (US Salinity Lab, 450 W. Big Springs Road, Riverside, CA; mark.ibekwe@ars.usda.gov).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, 13 June.

The contamination of food by pathogens, e.g., E. coli, Salmonella, Streptococcus aureus, Listeria, Campylobacter spp., etc., can cause major human and animal ailments, including death. Understanding the sources of these pathogens (e.g., farm environment, water, milk, produce, meat, etc.) and their methods of dissemination into the food chain is crucial to mitigate and control their spread. This symposium will bring together researchers from industry and academia in the broad area of farm to fork continuum.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(26) Corrosion and Protective Coatings. Organizers: Vilupanur Ravi (Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA; vravi@cpp.edu) and Michael F. Hurley (Boise State University, Boise, ID; mikehurley@boisestate.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Wednesday morning, 13 June.

The corrosion of metallic materials affects almost every conceivable industrial sector and is a matter of major economic concern. This symposium will bring together researchers addressing different areas of corrosion and protective coatings/surface modification.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(27) Microbiome in the Environment, Health and Disease. Organizer: Carolina Livi (Ashland, OR; cblivi@gmail.com).
All day program, currently scheduled for Friday, 15 June.

The microbiome is being implicated and correlated to a number of phenotypes. Several additional mechanisms of molecular regulation discoveries have added to biological complexity. Now the microbiota add another layer to be analyzed with the full range of omics technologies. In this session we will have speakers approaching the study of microbiota from a range of perspectives.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(28) Exploring Public Facets of Science and Technology Studies. Organizers: Eric M. Conway (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 111-B20, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109; Erik.M.Conway@jpl.nasa.gov) and Zuoyue Wang (California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA 91768; zywang@cpp.edu
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Thursday morning, 14 June.

This symposium will explore the various ways that science and technology studies inform public history, public policy, and undergraduate teaching. Speakers will discuss their experiences in building STS programs in California universities, in participating in public discussions around science and technology policy issues, and in doing laboratory history writ large.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            


(29) Political Consequences of Framing Issues. Organizers: Jeffery S. Mio (Psychology and Sociology Department, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, 3801 W. Temple Avenue, Pomona, CA, 91768; jsmio@cpp.edu).
Half-day program, currently scheduled for Friday afternoon, 15 June.

We live in societies that commune together and rely upon one another for mutual support. It is said that politics is a way of settling our disagreements without resorting to violence or war. This symposium will examine citizenship and broader aspects of living in society. The first presentation will explore what is called the “metaphor extension hypothesis," which suggests that when in the context of a political debate and our opponent uses a particularly effective metaphor to characterize his/her position, we are more effective in our response if we were to use that metaphor and extend it or turn it against itself. Data will be presented to support this hypothesis. The second presentation will examine the rhetoric used by Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election. Results suggest that Trump’s rhetoric seemed to resonate more to the American identity, whereas Clintons rhetoric tended to emphasize her personal qualities in relation to Trump’s qualities. This has implications for future presidential rhetoric. The third presentation will take a sociological look through the lens of the famous philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. This presentation explores an embrace of the vitality of living by respecting the mortality of systems and the self’s relationship to them.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            

 




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