98th Annual Meeting
Hawai`i Preparatory Academy
Waimea, Big Island, Hawai`i
June 19 - 23, 2017

SYMPOSIA



The following symposia are in various stages of planning for the annual meeting. The listings below are tentative and subject to change. New symposia will be added as information is received from the organizers. Check this web site regularly for updated information. Inquiries can be emailed to aaaspd@sou.edu. If you plan to attend the meeting largely for one symposium, please call 541–552–6869 to confirm its status before committing travel funds.

Please bookmark this page and check back frequently, as this information is frequently updated as new information becomes available. Abstracts for presentations are expected to become availableby mid-April, perhaps earlier.



Index To Symposia


(1) Galápagos 2017: Galápagos and Hawai`i
(2) The 2014-2016 Mass Coral Bleaching Event in the Pacific Islands – Impacts, Resilience, Hope and Actions
(3) Adiabatic Quantum Computation and Quantum Annealing Program withdrawn by organizer.
(4) Recent Advances in Pharmacology, Toxicology and Medicinal Chemistry
(5) Mechanisms of Tumor Progression and Cancer Therapeutics
(6) Social Responsibility of Scientists in the Technological Age
(7) Turbulence Conference at Mauna Kea (TMC 2017): Recent Advances in Turbulence Research
(8) High Altitude Climate Change Trends and Alpine Ecosystem Impacts in Hawaii
(9) New Challenges in Environmental Sciences, Heredity and Development, and Evolution
(10) Thinking Philosophically Across the Sciences: Analogies, Models, and Mechanisms
(11) The Humanities and the Changing Environment



Symposium Descriptions


(1) Galápagos 2017: Galápagos and Hawai`i. Organizer: Matthew J. James (Department of Geology, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA; james@sonoma.edu).
Three day program, scheduled for Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, 20, 22, and 23 June.

This will be a three-day symposium with opportunities for speakers with research interests in both the Galápagos Islands and the Hawaiian Islands. The range of topics can cover conservation biology, any aspect of zoology, botany, or paleontology and geology, and evolutionary biology. Holding the symposium on the Big Island of Hawai’i will afford an opportunity for interactions between researchers with expertise in two of the world’s best known archipelagoes, that also have played pivotal roles in shaping evolutionary theory and testing policies and procedures in conservation biology. Those interested in contributing to the symposium should contact the symposium organizer and AAASPD President for 2017 Prof. Matt James, Sonoma State University at james@sonoma.edu.

ABSTRACTS for this program should be available for downloading in late April 2017.

     



(2) The 2014-2016 Mass Coral Bleaching Event in the Pacific Islands – Impacts, Resilience, Hope and Actions. Organizer: Russell “Rusty” E. Brainard (Chief, Coral Reef Ecosystem Program, NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center – Ecosystem Sciences Division, Honolulu, HI; rusty.brainard@noaa.gov).
Full day program, scheduled for TBA.

Over the period 2014-2016 (and possibly into 2017), coral reefs experienced the longest lasting (2.5–3 years) and likely the most damaging and widespread global coral bleaching event ever observed. Across the vast Pacific Ocean, repeated mass coral bleaching and mortality events were observed in Hawaii in the North Pacific in 2014 and 2015, in Samoa in the South Pacific in 2015, in the Mariana Islands in the Western Pacific in 2014 and 2015, in Kiribati and the Line and Phoenix Islands of the Central Pacific in 2015-2016, across much of the Great Barrier Reef and portions of the Coral Triangle in 2016, across Micronesia in 2016, and elsewhere around the globe. The early stages of this global bleaching event appeared associated with the so-called ‘Blob’ of anomalously warm water across the eastern North Pacific in 2013-2015 and later tightly associated with the extreme 2015-2016 El Nino warm event. This symposium aims to bring together a diverse range of speakers to discuss all aspects of this devastating coral bleaching event, including: the causative warm water events, the observed vulnerabilities, resistances, and resilience of different coral taxa under varying environmental conditions, lessons learned from laboratory and mesocosm response experiments and numerical models, reasons and needs for hope and optimism, and actions that local communities and global society can take to reduce the frequency, severity, and impacts of future mass bleaching events to increase the likelihood of persistence of coral reef ecosystems and marine biodiversity in the face of climate change.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     



(3) Adiabatic Quantum Computation and Quantum Annealing. Organizer: Daniel Lidar (Electrical Engineering Department, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; lidar@usc.edu).
One and one-half day program, scheduled for TBA.

Program withdrawn by organizer.

     



(4) Recent Advances in Pharmacology, Toxicology and Medicinal Chemistry. Organizer: Kristen Mitchell (Department of Biology, Boise State University, Boise, ID; kristenmitchell@boisestate.edu). Co-organizer: Jozef Stec (Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Marshall B. Ketchum University, Fullerton, CA; jstec@ketchum.edu).
Full day program, scheduled for TBA.

The development of novel therapeutic strategies is a long and complex process that requires a detailed understanding of mechanisms that regulate homeostasis, along with an appreciation of the delicate balance that exists between the pharmacological and toxicological effects of chemical compounds. This session will focus on recent advances in understanding the pharmacological and toxicological effects of known drugs, drug candidates, other chemicals and environmental contaminants. Investigators are invited to present research on the identification of targets for new drug development, new drug screening strategies, discovery and development of potential drug candidates as well as elucidation of novel mechanisms of drug action. Emphasis will also be placed on the identification of mechanisms of toxicity for drugs, chemicals and environmental contaminants, as well as novel approaches to toxicity testing.

ABSTRACTS for this program should be available for downloading in late April 2017.

     



(5) Mechanisms of Tumor Progression and Cancer Therapeutics. Organizer: Cheryl Jorcyk (Department of Biology, Boise State University, Boise, ID; cjorcyk@boisestate.edu).
One-half day program, scheduled for TBA.

Cancer is a large group of different diseases, all involving uncontrolled growth of cells in the body. During tumor progression, cells proliferate, form malignant tumors, invade to nearby parts of the body and metastasize, or spread, to more distant parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. This program will provide scientific presentations addressing different mechanisms of tumor progression and metastasis, as well as mechanistic discussions on established and emerging cancer therapeutics. This symposium is designed for all types of biomedical researchers, undergraduate and graduate students, physicians and oncologists, nurses, pharmacists, and others who research or manage patients with cancer.

ABSTRACTS for this program should be available for downloading in late April 2017.

     


(6) Social Responsibility of Scientists in the Technological Age. Organizer: Raghavan Jayaakumar (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (retd.), Livermore, CA; raghavan.jayakumar@gmail.com). Co-organizer: Jesse J. Thomas (San Diego State University (retd.), San Diego, CA; Email: jthomas@mail.sdsu.edu or you1@verizon.net ; jthomas@mail.sdsu.edu or you1@verizon.net).
Full day program, scheduled for TBA.

The technological age has brought unprecedented benefits to society. Given the scope and speed of these developments, though, society may not have the ability and time to fully understand long-term impacts and react appropriately. For example, DDT, upon the discovery of its anti-arthropod activities, was widely used to help control diseases such as malaria. It was only years later that its sinister side was realized with the discovery that it accumulated within food chains causing reproductive failure in bird populations and problems in other species as well. The development of CFCs led to widespread use of these compounds as refrigerants, only to later be determined a causative factor in the development of holes in the ozone layer. The development of newer chemicals such as neonicotinoids for insect control and glyphosate and atrazine for weed control has environmentalists worried that sensitive ecosystems and even entire biospheres may be endangered by these newer chemical and genetic engineering technologies. The thesis of this symposium is that science, as an expression of human life, should embody ethics and responsibility. Technology, being an outcome of science, should be considered a scientific responsibility. This symposium will focus on the approach scientists and technologists might take to fulfill this responsibility by discussing such questions as:

  • Should scientists and technologists adopt the principle of “First, do no harm”?

  • Should scientists assume responsibility for the consequences of their research and control technological development or leave it to others such as funding agencies and corporations?

  • How can scientists help society with risk assessment in order to help shape public policy on science and technology

  • How can scientists help stake-holders develop holistic solutions that protect the environment

  • How can scientists ensure that genetic and cyber technologies do not imperil human dignity and human rights

  • How can present and future scientists be educated on the risks of various newer technologies and their social responsibilities toward them
ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     



(7) Turbulence Conference on Mauna Kea (TCM 2017): Recent Advances in Turbulence Research. Organizer: Frank Jacobitz (Mechanical Engineering Department, University of San Diego, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA, USA; jacobitz@sandiego.edu). Co-organizers: Kai Schneider (Institut de Mathématiques de Marseille (I2M) du Centre de Mathématiques et d’Informatique, Aix-Marseille Université, 39, rue Joliot-Curie, 13453 Marseille Cedex 13, France; kai.schneider@univ-amu.fr; kai.schneider@univ-amu.fr and Katsunori Yoshimatsu (Institute of Materials and Systems for Sustainability, Nagoya University, Nagoya, 464-8603, Japan; yoshimatsu.katsunori@g.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp).
Three full day program, scheduled for Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, 20, 22, and 23 June.

The turbulent motion of fluids is an important mechanism for the transport and mixing in many engineering applications and geophysical environment. This symposium is organized as part of the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Pacific Division of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and it aims to include work on recent advances in turbulence research from theoretical, experimental, and field studies. In addition to oral and poster presentations in the mornings, the symposium will include time for discussions and joint work during the afternoon and evenings of the conference days.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     



(8) High Altitude Climate Change Trends and Alpine Ecosystem Impacts in Hawaii. Organizers: Fritz Klasner (Natural Resources Program Manager, Office of Mauna Kea Management, University of Hawaii, Hilo, HI; fklasner@hawaii.edu) and James Juvik (Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Hawaii, Hilo, HI; jjuvik@hawaii.edu).
Half day program, scheduled for TBA.

A discussion of tropical alpine and sub-alpine ecosystems in high mountain areas of Hawai'i as influenced by ongoing rapid climate change. Papers will focus specifically on high altitude vegetation ecotones, seabird habitat, and unique arthropod diversity The session will include both scientific and management issues for protected lands in the alpine zone ecosystems including: National Parks, State Forest Reserves, Natural Area Reserves, and Science Reserves. The natural resource issues and stakeholder concerns common to these areas span diverse management jurisdictions and objectives.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     



(9) New Challenges in Environmental Sciences, Heredity and Development, and Evolution. Organizer: Roberta L. Millstein (Department of Philosophy, University of California, Davis, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616; RLMillstein@UCDavis.edu).
Half-day program, scheduled for Thursday, 22 June.

The history and philosophy of biology examines conceptual, methodological, and ethical assumptions across the biosciences. Three areas of biology that have received particular attention include environmental sciences (such as conservation biology), development and heredity, and evolution. Yet new scientific, theoretical, and technological findings raise new challenges in each of these areas. We seek to clarify and address these challenges.

More specifically, we will engage with the following areas and topics:

  • How algorithmic innovations shaped conservation biology and challenge standard accounts of scientific “progress”;
  • The ethics of using CRISPR for gene drive in natural populations;
  • The role that concepts of species and populations play in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s proposal to remove grey wolves from the endangered species list;
  • Examining the connections between heredity and development, and exploring whether we have an explanation for either;
  • The history of genetic hitchhiking in evolution;
  • Understanding the concept of “mismatch” in evolutionary reasoning; and
  • The hologenome concept and the evolution of holobionts.
ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     



(10) Thinking Philosophically Across the Sciences: Analogies, Models, and Mechanisms. Organizer: Roberta L. Millstein (Department of Philosophy, University of California, Davis, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616; RLMillstein@UCDavis.edu).
Half-day program, scheduled for Thursday, 22 June.

As society and the sciences become increasingly specialized, it becomes ever more difficult to talk to one another across the sciences. We explore a number of ways in which we might cross scientific disciplines by examining a number of different areas of science and thinking about the various ways in which the sciences could potentially find common ground: models, analogical reasoning, mechanisms, incorporating citizens into science, and policy issues.

More specifically, we will engage with the following areas and topics:

  • Models and conceptual frameworks in forest regeneration;
  • Appropriate use of analogy in Pacific archaeology and anthropology;
  • Experiments using analogue models: the common conceptual basis and the wide variety of examples;
  • Invoking mechanisms and using common scientific tools across disparate domains of science;
  • The relationship between explanatory models in cognitive science, exploring whether 'integrated' models (such as those in predictive hierarchical processing) are in tension with functionally specialized/modular architectures;
  • Citizen science and the philosophy of science of Paul Feyerabend; and
  • Using models to understand Near-Earth Object impact hazards.
ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     



(11) The Humanities and the Changing Environment. Organizer: Robert L. Chianese (Department of English, California State University, Northridge, CA; RLChianese@gmail.com).
Half-day program, scheduled for TBA.

Poets, Writers, Artists, Philosophers, Historians and other Humanists have noticed, described and reshaped our cultural views of Nature and the Environment for centuries. Today they have a new challenge in how they see, understand, and depict what we as human beings have done to the planet while science explains how radically we have altered it to its detriment.

How should humanists present the world in their various works–as still strikingly beautiful or damaged and suffering under our ecological violations? Should glowing images and passages of remaining gorgeous nature be recommended for our appreciation as a way to motivate people to save it, or should images of unhealthy changes we have wrought be offered for our disturbing contemplation? How should we employ the past as an ecological referent for where we are now? How can we conceive of the influences on our own personal lives and our “nature” that the changes in external “nature” have wrought?

Also, can we humanists forge and promote actual imaginative and innovative humanities-based solutions to the crisis that have real practical benefits? Do the Humanities themselves have to evolve their scope, social commitment, and relationships to the sciences in order to address this issue? And, how might the standard humanities requirements and curricula adapt to this focus?

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     





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