98th Annual Meeting
Hawai`i Preparatory Academy
Waimea, Big Island, Hawai`i
June 19 - 23, 2017

Eduational Field Trips



All Educational Field Trips (EFTs) are open to meeting registrants and members of their families. Due to limited space, advance registration is required for all EFTs. Reservation and payment of EFT fee(s) is included on the Advance Registration Form. NOTE: A $10 Educational Field Trip registration fee will be added to the cost of the first EFT for each person not registered for the meeting. Non-registrants pay this fee only once, regardless of whether they participate in one or moreEFTs.

All Educational Field Trips depart from the James M. Taylor Commons (also referred to as the Taylor Commons or dining commons), shown in pink on this campus MAP.

A full refund will be granted if a Pacific Division EFT is cancelled by the Division. If a registrant cancels via e-mail or written notification received in the Pacific Division office no later than 3 June 2017, the registrant will receive a refund of the paid fee(s) less a $15 processing charge. Credit card refunds are subject to an additional 3.5% charge on the entire original billing to help cover the fees the Division pays to the credit card companies.


Wednesday, 21 June

 

Saturday, 24 June



Educational Field Trips

Wednesday, 21 June. 8:30 a.m. to about 8:00 p.m.
Trip 1: Circle the Big Island

Depart HPA at 8:30 a.m. for an all day trip to explore and circumnavigate the Big Island. We'll head northeast from Waimea, driving through Honoka‘a Town, and then visiting ‘Akaka Falls. We will eat a buffet lunch at Nani Mau Gardens, a commercial botanical garden in the industrial town of Hilo, on the east side of the Big Island (menu: barbeque pork ribs, baked mahi mahi, roast chicken, steamed vegetables, garlic spaghetti, steamed rice, garden salad, pineapple colelaw, fresh fruit, sheet cake, coffee, hot tea and iced tea). After lunch we'll visit the Mauna Loa Macadamia Nut Factory and then drive on for a short visit to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park where we will view the Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the Jaggar Museum and also tour the Thurston Lave Tube. Back on the road, we plan to visit the Ka‘u Coffee Mill and the Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach at the far south end of the Island. From there we head to Queen's Marketplace on the Kohala Coast (above Kailua Kona) for dinner on your own at the food court or the ABC store before returning to HPA about 8:00 p.m.

Includes transportation, entry fees, and buffet lunch at Nani Mau Gardens. Please note that miscellaneous food along the way and dinner at the Queen's Marketplace is on your own. Cost: $100 per person.

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Wednesday, 21 June. 8:00 a.m. to about 6:30 p.m.
Trip 2: Kona Historical Sites


For this trip we will head out at 8:00 a.m. south toward Kailua-Kona and beyond. Our first stop will be at the St. Benedict's Painted Church. From there we go to Pu'uhonua O Hōnaunau (the Place of Refuge), after which we visit the Kona Living History Farm to learn about early coffee farming. Heading back north, we'll stop at the Kona Commons Shopping Center for lunch on you own, after which we head to the Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park. Our final stop will be at the Parker Ranch Shopping Center in Waimea for dinner on your own (no dinner will be available at HPA this evening) and perhaps a bit of shopping. We plan to return to HPA by about 6:30 p.m.

Includes transportation and entry fees. Lunch and dinner are on your own. Cost: $80 per person.

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Wednesday, 21 June. 8:00 a.m. to about 9:00 p.m.
Trip 3: Kilauea Volcano

This tour departs HPA at 8:00 a.m. for about a two hour drive to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park where we will visit the Kilauea Volcano and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Led by Don Swanson, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, this trip introduces the geology and volcanology of the summit area of Kīlauea Volcano. The trip features both the lava flows that Kīlauea is famous for and also its explosive activity, an important but little acknowledged aspect of Kīlauea’s eruptive style.

We start at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, where we discuss the origin of the summit caldera and its recent eruptive activity. We go inside the observatory to learn about monitoring the volcano and then to a nearby outcrop of explosive deposits, one of which is from an eruption in 1790 that killed hundreds of people nearby. We then drive around the caldera, viewing Kīlauea Iki Crater and the lava lake formed in 1959. We turn down the Chain of Craters Road and walk on the July 1974 lava flow to observe its vent and a forest inundated by the flow. Farther down the road at Mauna Ulu, we discuss the 1969-74 eruption, walk along part of its fissure system, and puzzle why spatter is preserved on only one side of the fissure. We walk to Devil’s Throat, little more than 100 years old, and talk about the origin and evolution of such craters. Finally, we walk cross-country into the Koaʻe fault system, one of the world’s most active extensional faulting regimes, which has opened more than 30 m in the past 700 years. This fault system connects the east and southwest rift zones and as such is an important but underappreciated element of the volcano.

Walking is across uneven terrain, and good shoes or boots are recommended. Long pants protect from sharp rocks. The trip will last all day. We will be on our feet most of the day; the roundtrip into the Koaʻe fault system will take 45-60 minutes. After we leave the observatory, there is only one toilet, at Mauna Ulu, about halfway through the trip.

Heading home after this day of volcanology, we will eat dinner at the Kilauea Military Camp (KMC) before leaving the park. Dinner at KMC is on your own.

Includes transportation, entry fees, and sac lunch prepared on your own at HPA before leaving in the morning. Please note that miscellaneous food along the way and dinner at the Kilauea Military Camp is on your own. Cost: $70 per person.

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Wednesday, 21 June. 8:30 a.m. to about 7:30 p.m.
Trip 4: Kona Coffee Tour


This tour is designed to inform participants about the Kona Coffee industry on the Big Island. We will depart from the parking above Taylor Commons promptly at 8:30 a.m. Prior to our departure participants will need to make their own sack lunches, so plan on arriving at Taylor Commons no later than 8:00 a.m. to accomplish this, earlier if you are eating breakfast at the commons. Our first stop will be at the Hamakua Macadamia Nut Company in Kawaihae, on the coast about 20 miles from HPA. From there we will travel south below Kona for a tour of the Kona Living History Farm, where we will also eat our lunches. Afterwards, we will visit the Holualoa Kona Coffee Company and tour the Kona Joe Coffee Company. Dinner will be on your own at a stop on the way back to HPA.

Includes transportation, make your own sack lunch, and admissions. Note that dinner is on your own. Cost: $75 per person.

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Wednesday, 21 June. 9:00 a.m. to about 3:00 p.m.
Trip 5: ReefTeach Snorkeling


The ReefTeach Program at Kahalu‘u Bay aims to educate visitors and residents alike on how to avoid damaging corals and take care of turtles and reef animals. ReefTeach is a volunteer powered program that was initiated in 2000 by the University of Hawaiʻi Sea Grant College Program for West Hawaiʻi. In 2006 the U.H. Sea Grant College Program was joined by another strong partner, The Kohala Center, and ReefTeach has continued to expand into a visible, robust, and effective reef protection program. Today, well-trained and dedicated ReefTeach volunteers of all ages educate visitors about what corals are, about the different types of fish and invertebrates in the bay, and about the ecology of the reef. They also inform visitors and residents of turtle basking behavior and help reduce disturbances to turtles in the bay. (Information above excerpted from “About the Kahaluʻu Bay ReefTeach Project,” courtesy of The Kohala Center, and may be found at http://hbmpweb.pbrc.Hawaii.edu/tkc/reefteach-approved).

We will depart HPA promptly at 9:00 a.m. and head south to Kahalu‘u Beach State Park, where the ReefTeach Program is housed on the Big Island. After a time of orientation, participants will be able to snorkel in the waters of Kahalu‘u Bay, which is shallow and calm, making it ideal for novice snorkelers. The bay is home to a rich diversity of fish and other marine organisms, which make snorkeling an amazing experience. Snorkeling tips may be found by clicking HERE.

There are rest rooms, a snack bar, showers, and rentals at Kahalu‘u Beach State Park. Bring your own snorkeling gear or you can rent it for $13.50 at the park. After snorkeling, we will stop along the road for lunch on your own before returning to HPA.

Includes transportation and ReefTeach program. Lunch is on your own, as is snorkeling gear rental. Cost: $40.00 per person.

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Saturday, 24 June. 8:00 a.m. to about 9:00 p.m.
Trip 7: Kilauea Volcano

This tour departs HPA at 8:00 a.m. for about a two hour drive to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park where we will visit the Kilauea Volcano and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Richard Hazlett, assistant at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hawai`i Volcano Observatory, will join us to lead this trip. this trip introduces the geology and volcanology of the summit area of Kīlauea Volcano. The trip features both the lava flows that Kīlauea is famous for and also its explosive activity, an important but little acknowledged aspect of Kīlauea’s eruptive style.

We start at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, where we discuss the origin of the summit caldera and its recent eruptive activity. We go inside the observatory to learn about monitoring the volcano and then to a nearby outcrop of explosive deposits, one of which is from an eruption in 1790 that killed hundreds of people nearby. We then drive around the caldera, viewing Kīlauea Iki Crater and the lava lake formed in 1959. We turn down the Chain of Craters Road and walk on the July 1974 lava flow to observe its vent and a forest inundated by the flow. Farther down the road at Mauna Ulu, we discuss the 1969-74 eruption, walk along part of its fissure system, and puzzle why spatter is preserved on only one side of the fissure. We walk to Devil’s Throat, little more than 100 years old, and talk about the origin and evolution of such craters. Finally, we walk cross-country into the Koaʻe fault system, one of the world’s most active extensional faulting regimes, which has opened more than 30 m in the past 700 years. This fault system connects the east and southwest rift zones and as such is an important but underappreciated element of the volcano.

Walking is across uneven terrain, and good shoes or boots are recommended. Long pants protect from sharp rocks. The trip will last all day. We will be on our feet most of the day; the roundtrip into the Koaʻe fault system will take 45-60 minutes. After we leave the observatory, there is only one toilet, at Mauna Ulu, about halfway through the trip.

Heading home after this day of volcanology, we will eat dinner at the Kilauea Military Camp (KMC) before leaving the park. Dinner at KMC is on your own.

Includes transportation, entry fees, and sac lunch prepared on your own at HPA before leaving in the morning. Please note that miscellaneous food along the way and dinner at the Kilauea Military Camp is on your own. Cost: $70 per person.

Top



Saturday, 24 June. 9:00 a.m. to about 3:00 p.m.
Trip 8: ReefTeach Snorkeling


The ReefTeach Program at Kahalu‘u Bay aims to educate visitors and residents alike on how to avoid damaging corals and take care of turtles and reef animals. ReefTeach is a volunteer powered program that was initiated in 2000 by the University of Hawaiʻi Sea Grant College Program for West Hawaiʻi. In 2006 the U.H. Sea Grant College Program was joined by another strong partner, The Kohala Center, and ReefTeach has continued to expand into a visible, robust, and effective reef protection program. Today, well-trained and dedicated ReefTeach volunteers of all ages educate visitors about what corals are, about the different types of fish and invertebrates in the bay, and about the ecology of the reef. They also inform visitors and residents of turtle basking behavior and help reduce disturbances to turtles in the bay. (Information above excerpted from “About the Kahaluʻu Bay ReefTeach Project,” courtesy of The Kohala Center, and may be found at http://hbmpweb.pbrc.Hawaii.edu/tkc/reefteach-approved).

We will depart HPA promptly at 9:00 a.m. and head south to Kahalu‘u Beach State Park, where the ReefTeach Program is housed on the Big Island. After a time of orientation, participants will be able to snorkel in the waters of Kahalu‘u Bay, which is shallow and calm, making it ideal for novice snorkelers. The bay is home to a rich diversity of fish and other marine organisms, which make snorkeling an amazing experience. Snorkeling tips may be found by clicking HERE.

There are rest rooms, a snack bar, showers, and rentals at Kahalu‘u Beach State Park. Bring your own snorkeling gear or you can rent it for $13.50 at the park. After snorkeling, we will stop along the road for lunch on your own before returning to HPA.

Includes transportation and ReefTeach program. Lunch is on your own, as is snorkeling gear rental. Cost: $40.00 per person.

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