97th Annual Meeting
University of San Diego
San Diego, California
June 14 - 17, 2016

SYMPOSIA



The following symposia are in various stages of planning for the annual meeting. The listings below are tentative and subject to change. New symposia will be added as information is received from the organizers. Check this web site regularly for updated information. Inquiries can be emailed to aaaspd@sou.edu. If you plan to attend the meeting largely for one symposium, please call 541–552–6869 to confirm its status before committing travel funds.

Please bookmark this page and check back frequently, as this information is frequently updated as new information becomes available. Abstracts for presentations are expected to become availableby mid-April, perhaps earlier.



Index To Symposia



(1) Current Understanding and Data Gaps for Bahía de los Ángeles, An International Biosphere Reserve

(2) Bahía de San Quintín: The Status, Threats, and Solutions for One of the Last Intact Coastal Lagoons in Western North America

(3) Not Just a Walk in the Park: Ecology and Education in Mission Bay, San Diego

(4) How Ocean Acidification and Ocean Warming Could Influence the Functional Morphology and Ecology of Intertidal Organisms

(5) Particles in the San Diego Atmosphere: Reactions, Properties, Climate, and Health

(6) Recent Advances in Turbulence Research: Experiments, Theory, and Computations

(7) Scientific Maker Symposium and Exchange

(8) United States World’s Fairs and Expositions: Seeing Fairs as More than Fun Places to Visit

(9) Library Science Symposium: The Evolving Library

(10) Evaluating Return on Investment and Assessing Student Learning for Non-traditional Teaching Activities

(11) Mentoring and Deeper Learning in STEM Education

(12) Limits to the Second Law of Thermodynamics

(13) Quantum Retrocausation III

(14) Law Enforcement with Ethnoracially Diverse Communities in the 21st Century using Forensic Psychological Science: A Culturally Responsive International Paradigm

(15) Forensic Psychological Science on the Violence of Terroristic Groups: An Antiterrorism Threat Assessment Paradigm

(16) Conducting Mental Health Research in the Community Setting for the Benefit of Underserved Populations

(17) Boise Extravaganza in Set Theory (BEST)

(18) Philosophers of Biology Engaging the Biosciences

(19) At the Crossroads of Global Water Issues: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

(20) Climate Change Communication: Getting the Message Across to Diverse Audiences
        PROGRAM MERGED WITH #21. SEE 20.5 BELOW FOR NEW DESCRIPTION.

(20.5) Innovative Methods from the Humanities and Sciences to Communicate Climate Change Solutions

(21) Remedies from the Humanities for Human-caused Climate Change
        PROGRAM MERGED WITH #20. SEE 20.5 ABOVE FOR NEW DESCRIPTION.

(22) Pharmaceutical Research and Development: From Bench to Patient Care

(23) Recent Advanced in Pharmacology and Toxicology

(24) Theory, Experiment, and Computation: A Synergistic Approach to Research

(25) Precision, Ambiguity, and Creativity in Science and the Arts


Symposium Descriptions


(1) Current Understanding and Data Gaps for Bahía de los Ángeles, An International Biosphere Reserve. Organizer: Drew M. Talley (Environmental and Ocean Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; dtalley@sandiego.edu).
Half day program, scheduled for Thursday afternoon, 16 June.

For centuries, Bahía de los Ángeles has drawn explorers, naturalists, and scientific researchers from around the world to study the unique and contrasting desert and marine habitats, rich natural resources, and the high biodiversity that includes a variety of threatened and endemic species. These same elements have also attracted tourists; development, the pressures of which can be seen in the ecosystem; and have led to the declaration of the region as an International Biosphere Reserve. This region is a treasure in its own right and also provides lessons about how to balance the use and conservation of coastal and marine resources.

The goal of this symposium is to provide an overview of the broad range of research being carried out in Bahía de los Ángeles, as well as to identify gaps in data needed to be filled to better understand and manage this region, and others like it.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(2) Bahía de San Quintín: The Status, Threats, and Solutions for One of the Last Intact Coastal Lagoons in Western North America. Organizers: Drew M. Talley (Environmental and Ocean Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; dtalley@sandiego.edu) and Alan Harper (Terra Peninsular, Zona Centro, C.P. 22800 or, for US Mail: Terra Peninsular (C/O Endangered Habitats League), Los Angeles, CA).
Full day program, scheduled for all day Friday, 17 June.

San Quintín bay is the best preserved coastal lagoon ecosystem in the Meditteranean zone of western North America. The enormous tidal prism of this hyper saline bay leads to near complete replacement of its contents on Spring tides. Due to the intact upland ecosystem, limited agricultural flow, high marine productivity and terrestrial fog drip, it is a refuge for numerous migratory, endemic, and economically important species, as well supporting a managed shellfishery. This session will focus on recent research into the biodiversity and economic resources of the region, the potential threats, and how civil society, non-profits and government agencies are responding to those threats.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(3) Not Just a Walk in the Park: Ecology and Education in Mission Bay, San Diego. Organizers: Ronald S. Kaufmann and Nathalie B. Reyns (Environmental and Ocean Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; kaufmann@sandiego.edu and nreyns@sandiego.edu).
Full day program, scheduled for all day Wednesday, 15 June.

Mission Bay Park is the west coast’s largest aquatic park and a central feature of San Diego’s coastline. This urbanized estuary is fed by two major freshwater creeks and ~100 storm drains that channel runoff from a highly developed watershed into the bay. Besides its value for recreation, Mission Bay also hosts a diverse assemblage of aquatic species, ranging from phytoplankton and zooplankton to large invertebrates, fishes and marine mammals. The park also includes wildlife preserves that provide important habitat for nearly 100 species of birds, including the federally endangered Least Tern, Brown Pelican and Lightfooted Clapper Rail. Like many estuaries along the west coast of North America, Mission Bay has experienced biological invasions by non-indigenous species, and some of these have been associated with substantial impacts on the native fauna. Speakers contributing to this symposium will discuss the ecology of the bay, as well as efforts to engage students from the University of San Diego and local residents in scientific investigations addressing various aspects of the Mission Bay ecosystem.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(4) How Ocean Acidification and Ocean Warming Could Influence the Functional Morphology and Ecology of Intertidal Organisms. Organizers: Maya S. deVries and Jennifer R. A. Taylor (Marine Biology Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California; mdevries@ucsd.edu and j3taylor@ucsd.edu).
Full day program, scheduled for Wednesday, 15 June.

The acidity and temperature of the world’s oceans are increasing at unprecedented rates. Ocean acidification (OA) and ocean warming (OW), have been shown to profoundly affect many marine organisms that build calcified structures (calcifiers). Yet, there is a hypothesis that intertidal calcifiers will be less susceptible to OA and OW because they are already exposed to large fluctuations in pCO2 and temperature on a daily basis and have therefore evolved tolerance to extreme conditions. The goal of the proposed symposium is to evaluate this hypothesis and to understand why some intertidal calcifiers exhibit a response to OA and OW while others do not. We will begin by using tools from functional morphology to understand biomechanical and material properties responses to OA and OW. Specially, we will examine how rocky intertidal and coral reef organisms, including calcified algae, crustaceans, mollusks, and echinoderms, respond to OA and OW conditions. We will then broaden this view to synthesize how morphological and biomechanical changes at the individual level could influence ecosystem dynamics and structure via changes to community structure and trophic dynamics. We will end with a panel discussion aimed at developing future research directions that integrate links between species responses and ecosystem responses to OA and OW. Together, the proposed symposium will provide a comprehensive evaluation of how intertidal communities are expected to fare under future ocean conditions.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(5) Particles in the San Diego Atmosphere: Reactions, Properties, Climate, and Health. Organizer: David De Haan (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; ddehaan@sandiego.edu).
Full day program, scheduled for Wednesday, 15 June.

Aerosol particles have significant impacts on human health and global climate. San Diego is home to many active research groups who study atmospheric aerosol particles in the laboratory and in the field. In this symposium, researchers will describe their current efforts to characterize the chemical, optical, and physical properties of aerosol particles, both freshly formed particles and those that have been “aged” by several days of atmospheric reactions. The sources of these particles, and the ways that they change while aging in the atmosphere, are still quite uncertain. This symposium will therefore include experimental, field, and computational work addressing aerosol effects on human health and climate, the properties of aerosol particles that cause these effects, studies of how these properties change over time, and studies of aerosol particle formation.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(6) Recent Advances in Turbulence Research: Experiments, Theory, and Computations. Organizers: Frank Jacobitz (Mechanical Engineering Department, Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; jacobitz@sandiego.edu), Marko Princevac (Mechanical Engineering Department, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, California; marko@engr.ucr.edu), and Imane Khalil (Mechanical Engineering Department, Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; ikhalil@sandiego.edu).
Full day program, scheduled for Wednesday, 15 June.

This symposium is planned as a venue for the exchange of recent results in the field of turbulence research. Discussion topics will include geophysical turbulence and wildfire dynamics, but any topics related to turbulence research are appropriate for this session. Geophysical turbulence concerns flow with shear, stratification, or rotation and with applications in the atmosphere or oceans, including turbulence evolution, transport, and mixing of natural or anthropogenic substances. Atmospheric flows and turbulence in large part govern fire dynamics. Turbulent flows inside the canisters of spent fuel assemblies will be considered for 7x7 boiling water reactors. Studies that involve laboratory or field experiments, theoretical analysis, as well as simulation approaches will be discussed. The organizers particularly encourage students at the undergraduate or graduate level to present their work in this symposium.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(7) Scientific Maker Symposium and Exchange. Organizers: Joan Horvath and Rich Cameron (Nonscriptum LLC, Pasadena California; joan@nonscriptum.com and rich@nonscriptum.com).
Morning exchange followed by 3 hour symposium, scheduled for Thursday, 16 June.

Scientists have always been forced to create a lot of their equipment, but major discoveries typically have required large capital budgets. Even with those budgets, scientists often have to design their protocols to fit the equipment. Suppose it could be the other way around, and equipment could be easily developed to fit a protocol? Also, suppose you could put up plans for instrumentation and have people all over the world build something and go take data for you? This symposium will be in two parts. The first highlights use of these technologies to educate students. The second part explores applications of low-cost maker technologies to do science in the lab and in the field.

Download the Scientific Maker Exchange Flyer by clicking HERE.

ABSTRACTS for the Scientific Maker symposium: Click HERE to download.

ABSTRACTS for the Scientific Maker Exchange/Exhibition: Click HERE to download.

     

(8) United States World’s Fairs and Expositions: Seeing Fairs as More than Fun Places to Visit. Organizer: Alan L. Bain (National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution; baina@si.edu).
Half-day program, scheduled for Friday morning, 17 June.

United States world’s fairs have been viewed by the public as enjoyable venues to visit, places to partake of their food, look at their entertainers, and glimpse people from around the world. In fact, fairs demonstrated the political, scientific, and racial attitudes of their times, and projected what the correct American way and values should be for its citizens.

How the American West thought of itself and its conscious effort to dispel eastern perceptions of the West as an untamed, wild, and uncivilized frontier shaped the four Pacific Coast fairs and expositions promoters’ efforts in what was displayed at those fairs (1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition, Portland; 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, Seattle; 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition, San Francisco; and 1915 Panama-California Exposition, San Diego). Themes of economic opportunity, the natural world and environment, and race, were presented throughout the fairs, proclaiming to visitors that the region west of the Rockies represented the future of the United States.

Although anthropology played a critical role in the exhibitions and village displays shown at world’s fairs in the past, notably the World’s Columbian Exposition (Chicago, 1893) and the Louisiana Purchase Exposition (St. Louis, 1904), the Panama-California Exposition witnessed the largest display of physical anthropology seen by an American audience. Anthropologists and researchers were sent around the globe to capture skeletons. Artistic renderings and skeletal displays of stages in human evolution shown at the Panama-California Exposition represented a unique effort. The lasting impact of the exhibition, its influence on later exhibitions in the United States, and the creation of the permanent Museum of Man provides an example of the influence of anthropology at the fairs and expositions. At the San Diego exposition, almost 300 Apache, Hopi, Navajo, and Zuni tribal members resided in a large Indian Village demonstrating their crafts and modes of dress. The outdoor portion of the Exposition unleashed a century of influence over landscape and architecture and forever changed Balboa Park. Anthropologists also went to the fairs’ villages to collect anthropological data and conduct ethnological field studies. In addition, modern day use of poetry, literature, and performance show another side of world’s fairs, how they were a display of American imperialism, racism, and racial stereotyping. This session is designed to provide anthropological, historical, literary and performing arts narratives towards understanding how the fairs were developed, how they were used by scientists, and what they symbolized beneath the veneer of public entertainment.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(9) Library Science Symposium: The Evolving Library. Organizers: Crystal Goldman (Geisel Library, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California; clgoldman@ucsd.edu), Frank Jacobitz (Mechanical Engineering Department, Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; jacobitz@sandiego.edu), Amy Besnoy (Copley Library, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; abesnoy@sandiego.edu), Amanda Roth (Geisel Library, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California; aheath@ucsd.edu), and Kelly Riddle (Copley Library, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; kriddle@sandiego.edu).
Day and a half program, scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, 15 June and all day Thursday, 16 June.

The history of libraries stretches back thousands of years, yet the contemporary library as a conceptual and intellectual space, in community, and especially on the university campus, continues to change rapidly. The roles of librarians have had to keep pace with the evolving needs of library patrons and the use of library space. A wealth of new technologies, such as digitization of print and realia, 3D printing, and institutional repositories for both content and data have played a major part in many of the recent transformations in library services and librarian positions. The application of technology to many aspects of the profession have allowed for innovations in areas such as instruction, reference, cataloging, access, digitization, and scholarly communication. While technology has radically altered the work of librarians, its application to library work has allowed librarians to participate more fully in their communities.

This symposium seeks to highlight the evolution of library spaces, services, and pedagogy, as well as other developments in the field of librarianship as librarians have embraced technology to better serve patrons. From the history to the future of libraries, we wish to foster a dialogue on the many advances and challenges that have shaped the profession and the space--both physical and intellectual--in which librarians operate.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(10) Evaluating Return on Investment and Assessing Student Learning for Non-traditional Teaching Activities. Organizers: Crystal Goldman (Geisel Library, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California; clgoldman@ucsd.edu) and Paula S. Krist Institutional Research and Planning, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; pkrist@sandiego.edu).
Half-day program, scheduled for Friday morning, 17 June.

More and more often, educators are being asked to verify the effectiveness of their work through the assessment of student learning. Usually, the assessment of student learning takes place through the assessment of classroom experiences, using tests, papers, and projects. However, not all educational experiences occur in the traditional semester- or quarter-long course. There are compact overseas courses, one-shot library instruction sessions, and extracurricular programs, to name only a few, in which students can enrich their academic lives. For these non- traditional instructional settings, effective assessment can be a challenge. Those involved in such courses or programs still need to set reasonable goals and measureable outcomes, provide evidence of continuous improvement, and demonstrate a return on investment to the university. In many cases, authentic assessment strategies are more appropriate than classroom-based strategies.

This symposium will highlight some of the many ways in which university faculty and staff authentically assess and evaluate their non-traditional teaching and learning activities.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(11) Mentoring and Deeper Learning in STEM Education. Organizers: Carl A. Maida (University of California, Los Angeles, California; cmaida@ucla.edu) and Louis Nadelson (Utah State University, Logan, Utah; louis.nadelson@usu.edu).
Half-day program, scheduled for Thursday morning, 16 June.

Project-based learning and work practice activities that embrace mentoring are forms of deeper learning, which may serve as a corrective to current schooling regimes. However, there are limited opportunities for youth to actually engage in deeper learning activities with mentors within consciously designed communities of practice for skill acquisition. These activities are typically found in certain experientially based programs, such as internships and apprenticeships in the more progressive high schools, or in experimental co-curricular activities designed by universities and other non-profit organizations. Robert Halpern (2009) advocates for the high school apprenticeship as a form of learning that may provide the best chances for young people. Cognitive psychology and neuroscience are discovering what artisans have always known, namely the value of experiential and project-based learning in acquiring and retaining craft knowledge, or practical knowledge gained by experience. A sense of “knowing-in-action” comes from participation in practice-oriented learning experiences, which include school-to-work programs, service learning, mentorships, internships, and apprenticeships in various kinds of skilled work. Moreover, informal learning outside of school takes place in highly social venues that “offer a form of mentoring, apprenticeship, and participation that maximizes motivation and engages the learner’s sense of identity” (Meltzoff et al, 2009, 288), for example, as a fledgling scientist, engineer, designer, clinician, or teacher. Learning encounters between students and their mentors can be conceived as dialogues, and a distinctive feature of project-based learning is how the teacher-student relationship is constructed and negotiated through such encounters. Students who experience this form of learning are rewarded through the responses of their mentors in these encounters. Scientists in the emerging field of social neuroscience view encounters, such as mentoring, as ways to enhance social interaction that is essential to learning, which, in turn, is supported by neural circuits linking perception and action for “close coupling and attunement between self and other,” and for synaptic plasticity (Meltzoff et al, 2009, 285). This session will combine didactic, experiential, and reflective activities to engage audience members, including teachers and informal science educators, and presenters in a professional learning community experience. The intent is to provide an opportunity for collaborative inquiry and the learning related to the promotion of mentoring as a deeper learning approach to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) in the classroom and beyond. Participants in a breakout session will consider ways to foster mentoring in deeper learning activities, including project-based learning in the classroom, in after school programs, and in experiential, community-based learning activities, such as mentored internships and apprenticeships. Panelists in roundtable format will discuss current issues and future trends in STEM education, including teaching integrated STEM curriculum, engaging students in authentic STEM research, integrating citizen science into the STEM curriculum, teacher adoption of educational innovations to teach STEM, pre-college science enrichment and “pipeline” programs, and scientist-student mentoring activities in formal and informal settings.

References:

  • Halpern, R. (2009) The Means to Grow Up: Reinventing Apprenticeship as a Developmental Support in Adolescence. New York: Routledge.
  • Meltzoff, A.N., Kuhl, P.K., Movellan, J. & Sejnowsky, T.J. (2009) “Foundations for a New Science of Learning,” Science July 17, 325: 284-288
There are no abstracts for this session. The schedule will be available in the Proceedings, which all meeting registrants will receive when they complete their registration on-site.

     

(12) Limits to the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Organizer: Daniel P. Sheehan (Department of Physics and Biophysics, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; dsheehan@sandiego.edu).
Two day program, scheduled for Thursday and Friday, 16 and 17 June.

The second law of thermodynamics is foundational to science, engineering and technology. During the past two decades, however, more than two dozen challenges have been advanced into the general scientific literature by research groups worldwide. In recent years, several have undergone laboratory test, and their results indicate that the second law might not be universal.

In this symposium, the current experimental and theoretical status of second law, as well as its foundational issues, will be explored. Topics are expected to include Maxwell’s demon, decoherence, the thermodynamic arrow of time, and developments in the theory of nonequilibrium systems. Special attention will paid to laboratory experiments which address the question of its universality.

References:

  • Quantum Limits to the Second Law, D.P. Sheehan, Editor; AIP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 643, (AIP, Melville, New York, 2002).
  • Challenges to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, V. Capek and D.P. Sheehan; Fundamen- tal Theories of Physics, Vol. 146, (Springer, Dordrecht, Netherlands, 2005).
  • The Second Law of Thermodynamics: Foundations and Status, D.P. Sheehan, Editor, Special Issue, Foundations of Physics, Vol. 37.12 (2007).
  • Second Law of Thermodynamics: Status and Challenges, D.P. Sheehan, Editor; AIP Con- ference Volume 1411 (AIP, Melville, NY, 2011).
ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(13) Quantum Retrocausation III. Organizer: Daniel P. Sheehan (Department of Physics and Biophysics, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; dsheehan@sandiego.edu).
Two day program, scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, 15 and 16 June.

Causation – the principle that earlier events affect later ones, but not vice versa – undergirds our experience of reality and physical law. Although it predicated on the forward unidirectionality of time, in fact, most physical laws are time symmetric; thus, they formally and equally admit both time-forward and time-reverse solutions. Time-reverse solutions suggest that, in principle, the future might influence the past, i.e., reverse (or retro-) causation. Why time-forward solutions are preferentially observed remains an unresolved problem. In-with journal citations increasing exponentially in recent years.

Evidence for reverse causation is currently relatively scarce and controversial. While laboratory results are intriguing, theoretical models have lagged, not yet making solid con- nections with mainstream physics. Furthermore, many of the most basic physical issues – e.g., the role of the second law of thermodynamics in disallowing retrocausation, and whether retrocausation is best explained by energy transfers or simply by correlations without infor- mation exchange – remain open questions.

This symposium will explore recent experiments, theory, and philosophical issues concerning retrocausation. It is hoped the meeting will foster better theoretical models by which laboratory results can be understood, and stimulate new experiments and collaborations by which the underlying physics may be more clearly exposed.

References:

  • Frontiers of Time: Retrocausation – Experiment and Theory, D.P. Sheehan, Editor, AIP Conference Series, Volume 863, (AIP Press, Melville, NY, 2006).
  • Quantum Retrocausation: Theory and Experiment, D.P. Sheehan, Editor, AIP Conference Volume 1408 (American Institute of Physics, Melville, NY, 2011).
ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(14) Law Enforcement with Ethnoracially Diverse Communities in the 21st Century using Forensic Psychological Science: A Culturally Responsive International Paradigm. Organizer: Ronn Johnson (Clinical Mental Health Program, School of Leadership and Education Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; ronnjohn@sandiego.edu).
Half-day program, scheduled for Wednesday morning, 15 June.

The diverse worldwide policing demands of the 21st Century law enforcement has resulted in the need for qualified psychologists to grabble with substantive concerns associated with policing diverse communities. For example, in September of 2015 the Ferguson Commission Report concluded “We have not moved beyond race.” The report detailed an assessment of community conditions that fueled the diverse reactions observed in the aftermath of this case. Many of the reactions were the result of multigenerational economic, education, housing and health-related factors. Although the ignition point for the nationwide response seemed to be largely triggered by the pockets of negative perceptions of the criminal justice system and law enforcement. Forensic psychology can assume a pivotal role in the organizational structure of departments. The objective of this symposium is to use a forensic psychological science to assess factors that are designed to make policing more culturally responsive. Some of the projected paper presentations include:

  • The forensic psychology of policing in diverse communities: Post-Ferguson Commission Report
  • Culturally responsive use of clinical forensic psychological evaluation tools for various public safety purposes
  • Arrest and Incarceration of women of color
  • Integrating Evidence-based and Culturally Responsive Mental Health Services for policing diverse communities
  • Can Citizen Review Boards fulfill a dual-role of facilitating Police Accountability and promote Ethnoracial Trust from Diverse Communities?
ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(15) Forensic Psychological Science on the Violence of Terroristic Groups: An Antiterrorism Threat Assessment Paradigm. Organizer: Ronn Johnson (Clinical Mental Health Program, School of Leadership and Education Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; ronnjohn@sandiego.edu).
Half-day program, scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, 15 June.

Homeland Security and forensic psychologists search for ways to empirically understand the motives behind the surge in what may be assessed as senseless violence. Acts of terrorism are traumatic incidents that have no international border restrictions. To no surprise, this type of violence is also used as a form of terrorism. Empirically, it has continued to have a traumatic effects on a diverse group of individuals and is an international phenomena. Terrorists use a variety of tactics, techniques, and procedures to achieve their often unstated objectives. Research has consistently demonstrated that Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can be one of the clinical outcomes for terrorism that also potentially results in forensic consequences. For example, the rescue of a large group of Kurds from ISIS who were destined for a mass killing revealed unimaginable testimonies about their tortuous imprisonment. The objective of this symposium is to use a forensic psychological science to assess senseless violence as a potential western recruitment approach used by groups like ISIS and AQAP. Among some of the projected paper presentations include:

  • Is there a forensic science nexus between senseless violence and terrorism group’s recruitment of westerners?
  • Are there evidence-based treatments available for survivors and others indirectly exposed to terrorism?
  • What does science reveal about the forensic psychological mindset of terrorists that engage in senseless acts of violence?
  • What empirically-based threat assessment models are effective in identifying PTSD vulnerabilities in Homeland Security personnel?
  • Can psychological stress inoculation approaches be used as an evidence-based antiterrorism strategy?
ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(16) Conducting Mental Health Research in the Community Setting for the Benefit of Underserved Populations. Organizer: Patricia L. Jones (Research and Publications Coordinator, Community Allies for Psychological Empowerment, San Diego, California; pjones@cape-ari.org).
Half-day program, scheduled for Thursday afternoon, 16 June.

At present, the status quo of mental health care for underserved populations lies in minimal services provided in county mental health, an absence of mental health care entirely, services rendered by volunteers lacking clinical training, and provision of non-clinical interventions through the conduit of peer support. In order to ameliorate the gap between good intentions and emergency mental health care, change is necessary. Funding the programs already in place is not enough to elicit sustained, prudent, efficacious change. Research that provides the capability to conduct rigorous statistical analysis of outcome-based data to ensure treatment efficacy and validate protocols tailored to our populations and community partner needs is necessary. This symposium is designed to provide a detailed overview of the planning, implementation, dynamics, operations, and goals of an evidence-based, data-driven, community research program. While the lessons here are specific to mental health, the model itself can be applied to a vast number of fields in which scientific inquiry has an impact on the lives of community members. Examining the data and feedback in the context of the original community experience isn’t a novel idea, it’s just good practice. Evidence-based practices and sound program development are the cornerstones of effective treatment, and the key to understanding and addressing the issues afflicting the communities we serve.

Topical Areas – May be condensed to fewer sections with same content.

  1. Know Your Topic – Choosing an Appropriate Research Study Topic in your Community
  2. Rethink Design – Data From the Field is Not the Same as Data From the Laboratory
  3. Forensic Populations – Special Considerations in Research Design
  4. Other Vulnerable Populations – Special Considerations in Research Design
  5. Data Safety and the Ethics – Longitudinal Research in Communities
  6. The IRB – Working with Local Educational IRBs or Establishing a Community IRB
  7. Comparing Local Data to National Samples – When, Why, and How
  8. Interrupting Dichotomies – Active/Passive Research rather than Theoretical/Applied Research.
ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(17) Boise Extravaganza in Set Theory (BEST). Organizers: Liljana Babinkostova, Samuel Coskey, and Marion Scheepers (Department of Mathematics, Boise State Univeristy, Boise, Idaho; liljanababinkostova@boisestate.edu).
Two day program, scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, 15 and 16 June.

This program is a continuation of the well-known conference BEST (Boise Extravaganza in Set Theory). BEST focuses on the mathematical discipline called Set Theory, and its applications in other disciplines in Mathematics. BEST, for its first nineteen years hosted in Idaho at Boise State University, has been a symposium at the Pacific Division annual meetings since 2013.

Set Theory is the mathematical foundation for the study of the infinitary objects that routinely arise in Mathematics and its applications, and in the mathematical sciences. Contemporary set theoretic research addresses basic questions about provability, consistency and independence, and the relative strength of postulates or hypotheses in mathematized scientific theories. The methods developed by set theory serve as powerful tools for applications in many other mathematical disciplines, including algebra, analysis, combinatorics, complexity, topology and more.

The invited speakers for this program are successful set theorists from different career stages and will present high level scientific talks in several areas of set theory and its applications. The BEST symposium will also host contributed talks in Set Theory and its applications by participants. Undergraduate and graduate students will also present research accomplishments in these areas.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(18) Philosophers of Biology Engaging the Biosciences. Organizer: Roberta Millstein (Department of Philosophy, University of California, Davis, Davis, California; RLMillstein@UCDavis.edu).
All day program, scheduled for Friday, 17 June.

Contemporary scientists are constantly being challenged to be more interdisciplinary and integrative in their approach; as such, tools from computer science and engineering are deployed in biology, and biological theory has been exported into new domains — from cancer biology to toxicology. These advances in modern biology have generated a set of interesting philosophical challenges: first, how best can we find common ground across disciplines, and what is distinctive about explanations in the biological sciences? We plan to focus on a number of case studies that illustrate the challenges and opportunities associated with moving across disciplinary boundaries: individualized medicine, sex determination, systems biology, cancer biology, and toxicology. A central theme is the nature of reductive versus integrative approaches to the sciences.

More specifically, we will engage with the following areas and topics:

  • evaluation and analysis of evidence in individualized medicine
  • measurement, robustness analysis, and temperature-dependent sex determination in turtles
  • a model of cancer that incorporates evolutionary, ecological, and developmental aspects
  • the reception of new approaches to toxicology based on modern systems biology
  • explanation in systems biology
  • scientific generalizations in the biological sciences
  • mechanisms in molecular biology
ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(19) At the Crossroads of Global Water Issues: An Interdisciplinary Perspective. Organizers: James Bolender (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; bolender@sandiego.edu) and Michael Rosen (United States Geological Survey, Carson City, Nevada).
Half day program, currently scheduled for Friday morning, 17 June.

Water contamination and access issues related to clean water is a global problem. Bacterial, parasitic, industrial run offs, pesticides, anthrogenic and geogenic heavy metal contamination of water is evident in developed and developing nations. There are common issues that can hinder access to this vital resource and common significant health outcomes as a consequence of consuming such contaminated water. This symposium aims to explore the issues in access to clean water across the globe and the health consequences from a scientific perspective. Discussion about the interdisciplinary attempts to address these problems via public health education about nutritional and sanitation interventions to clean the water and promote excretion of contaminants; as well as locally accessible remediation processes that could be used to further improve access to and consumption of clean water will be addressed. We welcome contributions from fields as varied as engineering, sociology, environmental psychology, political science, chemistry, biology, and more.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(20) Climate Change Communication: Getting the Message Across to Diverse Audiences. Organizer: Michel Boudrias (Department of Environmental and Ocean Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; boum@sandiego.edu).
Half to full day program, currently scheduled for Thursday, 16 June.
PROGRAM MERGED WITH #21. SEE 20.5 BELOW FOR NEW DESCRIPTION.

Climatologists, oceanographers, and atmospheric scientists have been increasing their efforts to quantify the impacts of climate change at several geographic scales from the local issues to the global patterns of change in temperature, greenhouse gases and sea level rise. Translating the complexities of climate science to connect to diverse audiences, from students in K-12 settings to college courses to zoos, aquaria and museums to decision makers in the community, has become a field of its own. Teams of researchers from multiple disciplines have been working together to find the best ways to explain the science, develop innovative educational resources and provide potential solutions to deal with the impacts of climate change. This symposium will bring together climate scientists, science educators, social psychologists and practitioners to share what they have learned from their interdisciplinary efforts and resources that can be used to educate diverse audiences about climate change.

ABSTRACTS: See symposium 20.5 below.

     

(20.5) Innovative Methods from the Humanities and Sciences to Communicate Climate Change Solutions. Organizers: Michel Boudrias (Department of Environmental and Ocean Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; boum@sandiego.edu) and Robert L. Chianese (Department of English, California State University, Northridge; RLChianese@gmail.com).
Half day program, scheduled for Thursday afternoon, 16 June.
PROGRAM MERGED WITH #21. SEE 20.5 BELOW FOR NEW DESCRIPTION.

Translating the complexities of climate science to connect to diverse audiences, from students in K-12 settings to college courses to zoos, aquaria and museums and to decision makers and the general public, has become a field of its own. Teams of researchers from multiple disciplines have been working together to find the best ways to explain the science, develop innovative educational resources and provide potential solutions to deal with the impacts of climate change. The Humanities can complement science education by focusing on what motivates and engages people to redress our damage to the eco-system besides familiar and devastating images and words that expose that damage. Artists, writers, philosophers, ethicists, and humanities-focused environmentalists provide new approaches to motivating the public to change our fossil-fueled ways, implement new sustainable technologies and living styles, and devise and market compelling ethical principles to keep the planet from heating up further. This symposium will involve scientists and humanists in presenting such innovative strategies.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(21) Remedies from the Humanities for Human-caused Climate Change. Organizer: Robert L. Chianese (Department of English, California State University, Northridge; RLChianese@gmail.com).
Half day program, currently scheduled for Thursday, 16 June.
PROGRAM MERGED WITH #20. SEE 20.5 ABOVE FOR NEW DESCRIPTION.

The Humanities can provide unique and helpful insights about the sources, consequences, and remedies for human-caused climate change. For this symposium, presenters need to give attention to those remedies.

Some questions to ponder and address:

  • What motivates and engages people to redress our damage to the eco-system besides familiar and devastating images and words that expose that damage?

  • How can artists, writers, philosophers, ethicists, and humanities-focused environmentalists provide new approaches to motivating the public to accept climate science, change our fossil-fueled ways, implement new sustainable technologies and living styles, and devise and market compelling ethical principles to keep the planet from heating up the 2 degrees C we must not reach if we are to stave off climate calamity?

  • How can we forge and promote imaginative and innovative humanities-based solutions that have real practical benefits?

  • Do the Humanities themselves have to evolve their scope, social commitment, and relationships to the sciences in order to address this issue? How might the standard humanities requirements and curricula adapt to this focus?
ABSTRACTS: See symposium 20.5 above..

     

(22) Pharmaceutical Research and Development: From Bench to Patient Care. Organizer: Jozef Stec (Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Marshall B. Ketchum University, Fullerton, CA; JStec@ketchum.edu).
Half day program, scheduled for Wednesday morning, 15 June.

This symposium has interdisciplinary nature and will blend research concepts pertaining to medicinal chemistry, microbiology, molecular biology and medicine. This symposium will be an excellent opportunity to learn more about contemporary pharmaceutical research and engage in the dialogue on the impact of pharmaceutical research on patient care. The presenters will showcase results from their bench research that can enable novel approach to treatment of various diseases such as cancer and bacterial/viral infections. The discussed topics will be easy-to-understand by the general scientific audience and they will highlight the "translational" component of basic pharmaceutical research, i.e. how fundamental research discovery can be utilized in the clinic and ultimately improve patient care in the broader sense. Diversity among the invited speakers and presentation topics will provide an excellent opportunity for open discussion and networking for the symposium attendees.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(23) Recent Advances in Pharmacology and Toxicology. Organizer: Kristen Mitchell (Department of Biology, Boise State University; kristenmitchell@boisestate.edu).
Half day program, scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, 15 June.

The development of novel therapeutic strategies requires a detailed understanding of mechanisms that regulate homeostasis, along with an appreciation of the balance that exists between the therapeutic and toxic effects of chemical compounds.  This session will focus on recent advances in understanding the pharmacological and toxicological effects of drugs, chemicals and environmental contaminants. Investigators are invited to present research on the identification of targets for new drug development, new drug screening strategies, and novel mechanisms of drug action.  Emphasis will also be placed on the identification of mechanisms of toxicity for drugs, chemicals and environmental contaminants.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(24) Theory, Experiment, and Computation: A Synergistic Approach to Research. Organizers: C. Mark Maupin (Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; cmmaupin@mines.edu) and Owen McDougal (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State Univesity; owenmcdougal@boisestate.edu).
Half day program, scheduled for Thursday morning, 16 June.

The utilization of theory and computations to complement and sometimes lead (i.e. theory driven research) experimental efforts is becoming increasingly common. The synergistic combination of experiment, theory, and computations has allowed for a greater understanding of many physical phenomena. The structural information obtained from various techniques such as X-ray and NMR is often critical to the creation of realistic models for computations, while theory and computations often reveal molecular-level insights into catalytic mechanisms, binding phenomena, and system dynamics. This symposium is focused on the combination of experiment and theory/computations to expand our understanding of diverse systems ranging from gas phase reactions to complex condensed phase systems.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     

(25) Precision, Ambiguity, and Creativity in Science and the Arts. Organizer: Jesse J. Thomas (Department of Religious Studies, San Diego State University, San Diego, California; jthomas@mail.sdsu.edu) and Dawn Marie Hamilton (D.M.A. Candidate, Clarinet Performance, University of California, Los Angeles; clarinetreble@@gmail.com).
Half day program, scheduled for Friday Morning, 17 June.

When describing nature, science has traditionally utilized precise representations while the arts have utilized ambiguous metaphors, each discipline more or less agreeably leaving the other to its own devices. Recently, such distinctions have become increasingly difficult to maintain on both sides. In science much of the discussion focuses on the meaning of creativity, where imprecise and ambiguous metaphors are developing. This can be found, for example in physical theories of nonlocality, evolutionary theories of spontaneity in the emergence of new species, cognitive science in childhood development theory. Cognitive scientists Thelen and Smith comment: “A dynamic system is a metaphor that turns empirical questions around by focusing attention on mechanism, the relation between stability and variability, the process of change.”

Papers may address such ambiguous questions as: Are the scientific and artistic metaphors of creativity compatible, or are they categorically different? How does science understand artistic creativity? How does art understand scientific complex systems? Is scientific creativity simply that which is not yet explainable in existing scientific terminology? Are complex systems all that creative, or simply too complicated for ordinary people to understand? How can one explain how space disappears in non-locality without metaphor? Are new species simply built from very old species and so complicated that they cannot yet be explained, or genuinely new ones more have never existed before? Can a computer be creative? Can a work of art be considered an organism? Can Descartes’ mechanisms survive today? How are instruction processes different in science and art? Can classroom teaching in either science or the arts, especially in online teaching, be genuinely creative, and if so, how?

Papers or artistic presentations concerning such questions will be seriously considered.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

     







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