95th Annual Meeting
UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA
Riverside, California
June 17 - 20, 2014

WORKSHOPS and PANELS


PULSE–ating with Vision and Change: Promoting the Role of Faculty as STEM Education Change Agents  

Currently scheduled for Wednesday afternoon.

 
   
DockoMatic Experiments for the Science Curriculum  

Currently scheduled for Friday morning.

 
   
Gas Diffusion Simulations for Chemical Engineering Curriculum  

Currently scheduled for Friday afternoon.

 
   
Open Source 3D Printing—How Does It Really Work?  
Currently scheduled for Friday morning.  
   
Does Nature Photography Distort Environmental Realities?  
Currently scheduled for Friday morning.  

PULSE–ating with Vision and Change: Promoting the Role of Faculty as STEM Education Change Agents

Currently scheduled for Wednesday afternoon.

Session length: half-day

Organizers: David J. Marcey (Biology Department, California Lutheran University, Thousand Oaks, California; marcey@callutheran.edu) and Rick Gonzalez (Biology Department, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; gonzalez@sandiego.edu).

Description: This workshop is intended to advance faculty expertise in promoting department-level STEM education reform at their home institutions. Although the workshop staff are PULSE Vision and Change Leadership Fellows (PULSE = Partnership for Undergraduate Life Sciences Education), the topics covered will be relevant to all STEM fields. Workshop attendees will be active participants in developing skills and approaches that can be used to effect significant department-level educational change. Participants will employ self-assessment rubrics in order to determine their home department’s progress relative to the educational recommendations found in the AAAS/NSF Vision and Change (V&C) document. Attendee-led discussions of barriers to significant STEM education reform will be followed by activities designed to develop student-centered pedagogical “mindsets.” Participants will receive resources for Vision and Change implementation and each will develop a specific action plan to enhance their roles as change agents in their departments.

Participants are requested to sign up in advance to insure a space in the program. If you are planning to participate in this workshop, be sure to check the appropriate box on the Advance Registration Form.

Cost: No fee for meeting registrants; one-day registration fee for non-registrants.

DockoMatic Experiments for the Science Curriculum

Currently scheduled for Friday morning.

Session length: half-day

Organizers: C. Mark Maupin (Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado; cmmaupin@mines.edu) and Owen McDougal (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; owenmcdougal@boisestate.edu).

Description: This workshop will focus on the use of the program DockoMatic. This program, created at Boise State University, is a wrapper that links several different codes, including AutoDock4 and Modeller, into a single user friendly graphical user interface (GUI). During this workshop the participants will be guided through the use of DockoMatic to create a homology model of a macromolecule. After the successful creation of the 3D structure for the macromolecule, DockoMatic will then be used to automate docking calculations between the macromolecule and a ligand. The workshop will finish with an analysis of the calculations and a question/answer phase to help participants formulate ways in which to use DockoMatic for their own research or teaching needs.

Participants are requested to sign up in advance to insure a space in the program. If you are planning to participate in this workshop, be sure to check the appropriate box on the Advance Registration Form.

Cost: No fee for meeting registrants; one-day registration fee for non-registrants.

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Gas Diffusion Simulations for Chemical Engineering Curriculum

Currently scheduled for Friday afternoon.

Session length: half-day

Organizers: C. Mark Maupin (Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado; cmmaupin@mines.edu) and Owen McDougal (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; owenmcdougal@boisestate.edu).

Description: This workshop will focus on the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations of various flue gases passing through semi-permeable polymer membranes. The workshop will outline the use of computational techniques that will assist in the learning experience for undergraduate students. This module is appropriate for facilitating a molecular-level understanding of various topics including molecular interactions, diffusion, adsorption, and membrane separation phenomena.

Participants are requested to sign up in advance to insure a space in the program. If you are planning to participate in this workshop, be sure to check the appropriate box on the Advance Registration Form.

Cost: No fee for meeting registrants; one-day registration fee for non-registrants.

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Open Source 3D Printing—How Does It Really Work?

Currently scheduled for Friday Morning.

Session length: half-day

Organizer: Joan Horvath (Deezmaker 3D Printers, Pasadena, California; joan@deezmaker.com).

Description: What is 3-D printing, and how can it be used in scientific visualization and to make one-off objects you might need around the lab? What tools are available open source, and what is the workflow like if you are a user that needs maximal flexibility? Use a 3-D printer "in person" to learn what is and is not possible with one of these machines. Attendees will learn the state of the art in low-cost open-source 3D printing, the workflow involved in this type of printing, capabilities and limitations of low-cost printers, and some suggested applications. As time permits, some objects will be developed and printed to show the end-to- end process. People who are already conversant with 3D modeling can prepare a model ahead of time and skip the second hour. One particular 3D printer will be used, but the open source software suite works on many printer brands with some variation on input parameters.

Workshop Agenda:

  • First hour: Review of open source 3D printer technology, what it is good for and what it isn't ready for yet, and how the consumer printers have evolved.

  • Second hour: Introduce two free or open source 3D modeling programs (Tinkercad, if adequate wifi is available, and OpenSCAD) and let people make a simple object. For people who already are advanced 3D modelers, we will start printing out a file they have prepared ahead of time if it doesn’t require extensive fixes.

  • Third hour: Introduce the open source slicing and hosting programs Slic3r/Repetier Host. Discuss the considerations for printing something on a printer and then actually print out as many objects as we have time for. (We can leave the printers we bring printing for the duration of the symposium.)

Participants will be sent a list of software to download ahead of time (compatible with PC, Mac, Linux). The software is all open-source and free, except for Tinkercad which is a free cloud-based program which requires registration. Participants with extensive 3D modeling experience can prepare a .stl file for printing ahead of time if they wish (but should keep the item small – a few inches on a side at most – so that printing completes quickly.)

Participants are requested to sign up in advance to insure a space in the program, which is limited to 20 participants. If you are planning to participate in this workshop, be sure to check the appropriate box on the Advance Registration Form.

Cost: No fee for meeting registrants; one-day registration fee for non-registrants.

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Does Nature Photography Distort Environmental Realities?

Currently scheduled for Friday morning.

Session length: half-day

Organizer: Robert L. Chianese (Emeritus, Department of English, California State University Northridge, Northridge, California; rlchianese@gmail.com).

Description: This panel will discuss the impact of Nature Photography on public perceptions of the state of the environment. For instance, do stunning photos of the natural world serve to enhance appreciation and potential conservation of it, or do they provide a dishonest reassurance that the natural world continues to thrive in beauty and grandeur? Or, is photography an adequate medium to convey an objective view of the natural world?

The panelists come from such fields as Biology, Ethics, Photography, Ecology, Aesthetics, and the Humanities. Held in the California Museum of Photography as part of the annual Meeting of the AAASPD on the UCR campus, each panelist can present a short exploration of various kinds of Nature Photography and then the group will discuss and debate the topic, along with questions from the audience.

An essay by the organizer, “Is Nature Photography Too Beautiful?” published in the Jan/Feb American Scientist magazine, can serve as a catalyst for discussion. It can be found on line by clicking HERE.

Participants are requested to sign up in advance to insure a space in the program. If you are planning to participate in this workshop, be sure to check the appropriate box on the Advance Registration Form.

Cost: No fee for meeting registrants; one-day registration fee for non-registrants.

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