94th Annual Meeting
UNIVERSITY of NEVADA
Las Vegas, Nevada
June 16 - 19, 2013


SYMPOSIA


The following symposia are in various stages of planning for the annual meeting. The listings below are tentative and subject to change. New symposia will be added as information is received from the organizers. Check this web site for updated information or e–mail inquiries to aaaspd@sou.edu. If you plan to attend the meeting largely for one symposium, please call 541–552–6869 to confirm its status before committing travel funds.

Please bookmark this page and check back frequently, as this information is frequently updated as new information becomes available.



Index To Symposia


(1) Recent Advances in Pharmacology and Toxicology. PROGRAM  WITHDRAWN BY ORGANIZER; PAPERS WILL APPEAR AS PART OF CONTRIBUTED ORAL PAPER SESSION FOR CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY SECTION.

(2) Mechanisms of Tumor Progression and Cancer Therapeutics.

(3) Library Science and Archives: Forming Partnerships, Making Connections.

(4) Science and Feeling in the Arts.

(5) Ion channels: Integration of Computer Simulations with Experiment.

(6) Management of Endangered Species in the American West: Policy and Practice.

(7) Innovations and Trends in K-16 STEM Education.

(8) Soil-Plant-Water Reltionships in Arid Environments. PROGRAM WITHDRAWN BY ORGANIZER; PAPERS WILL APPEAR AS PART OF CONTRIBUTED ORAL PAPER SESSION FOR ECOLOGY, ORGANISMAL BIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES SECTION.

(9) Climate Change, Sustainability, and Water Resources in the Arid West.

(10) Dinosaurs and Their Neighbors: Mesozoic Paleontology and Paleogeography of Nevada, Utah, and Adjacent States.

(11) Recent Advances in Genetics and Cell Biology. PROGRAM WITHDRAWN BY ORGANIZER

(12) Boise Extravaganza in Set Theory (BEST).

(13) International Protected Area Exchange.

(14) Patient–Centered Outcomes Research and Patient Targeted Therapies.

(15) Forensic and Clinical Psychological Science Issues in Antiterrorism: An International Paradigm.

(16) Forensic Psychological Science of Juvenile Fire Setters and Bomb Makers.

(17) Accelerating Biomedical Discovery with Advanced Molecular Simulation and Computational Biology. THIS SYMPOSIUM WAS MERGED WITH #19 AND IS NOW IDENTIFIED AS #21

(18) Current Progress in Infectious Disease Research and Therapeutic Interventions.

(19) Structural Insights for the Development of New Therapeutics. THIS SYMPOSIUM WAS MERGED WITH #17 AND IS NOW IDENTIFIED AS #21

(20) Medicinal Chemistry and Biological Insights for the Treatment of Cancer. PROGRAM WITHDRAWN BY ORGANIZER

(21) Structural and Computational Approaches for Novel Therapeutics Development and Biomedical Insights.



Symposium Descriptions


(1) Recent Advances in Pharmacology and Toxicology. Organizer: Kristen Mitchell (Department of Biology, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; kristenmitchell@boisestate.edu).
Program withdrawn by organizer. Papers will appear in the contributed paper session for Cell and Molecular Biology.

The development of novel therapeutic strategies requires a detailed understanding of mechanisms that regulate homeostasis, along with an appreciation of the balance that exists between the therapeutic and toxic effects of chemical compounds.  This session will focus on recent advances in understanding the pharmacological and toxicological effects of drugs, chemicals and environmental contaminants. Investigators are invited to present research on the identification of targets for new drug development, new drug screening strategies, and novel mechanisms of drug action.  Emphasis will also be placed on the identification of mechanisms of toxicity for drugs, chemicals and environmental contaminants.


(2) Mechanisms of Tumor Progression and Cancer Therapeutics. Organizer: Cheryl Jorcyk (Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; cjorcyk@boisesstate.edu).
Currently scheduled for Tuesday afternoon, 18 June.

Cancer is a large group of different diseases, all involving uncontrolled growth of cells in the body. During tumor progression, cells proliferate, form malignant tumors, invade to nearby parts of the body and metastasize, or spread, to more distant parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. This program will provide scientific presentations addressing different mechanisms of tumor progression and metastasis, as well as mechanistic discussions on established and emerging cancer therapeutics. This symposium is designed for all types of biomedical researchers, undergraduate and graduate students, physicians and oncologists, nurses, pharmacists, and others who research or manage patients with cancer.

ABSTRACTS: click HERE




(3) Library Science and Archives: Forming Partnerships, Making Connections Organizers: Crystal Goldman (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, San Jose State University, One Washington Square, San Jose, CA; crystal.goldman@sjsu.edu), Frank Jacobitz (Mechanical Engineering Program, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; jacobitz@sandiego.edu), Michal Davidson (Idaho State Archives, Division of the Idaho State Historical Society, Boise, ID; michal.davidson@ishs.idaho.gov), Silke Higgins (Digital Initiatives Librarian, King Library, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA; silke.higgins@sjsu.edu), Susan Kendall (Collection Development Coordinator, King Library, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA; susan.kendall@sjsu.edu), Eva Stowers (University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV; eva.stowers@unlv.edu).
Currently scheduled for all day Monday, 17 June.

Libraries and archives in the digital age are often strengthened by developing partnerships. The form these take are as varied as the individuals who create them, but they can expand the capabilities of all involved and make possible projects that would otherwise not be realized. Librarians and archivists are often accustomed to working in a team structure, which fosters a cooperative environment that capitalizes on the strength of many. This interconnectedness can lead to innovation within the library or archives, and outreach to other individuals or groups can lead to progressive new projects.

This symposium will focus on the strengths of libraries and archives, both traditional and innovative, that serve to build the success of the academy as a whole. Rarely is such success achieved in a vacuum; thus, this symposium will also focus on the partnerships and connections librarians or archivists create with each other, with teaching faculty members, with other departments, other institutions, and other academic organizations in order to advance initiatives in instruction, reference, collection development, and digital projects.

ABSTRACTS: click HERE




(4) Science and Feeling in the Arts. Co-organizers: Robert L. Chianese (Department of English, Emeritus, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA; rlchianese@gmail.com) and Jesse James Thomas (Department of Religious Studies, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA; jthomas@mail.sdsu.edu).
Currently scheduled for all day Wednesday, 19 June.

This interdisciplinary symposium brings together the humanities and sciences in an exploration of the connections between science and aesthetics. It features two distinct though related topics: 1) scientific analysis and understanding of our responses to art (visual art, sculpture, music, dance, literature, film, architecture, etc.), and 2) the emotional/psychological responses we experience in relation to science-inspired art and the impact science-based art has on our appreciation of it.

The first topic seeks discussions of such matters as the scientific measurement of the impacts of the arts on intelligence, consciousness, mood, etc.; the attempts of psychology and brain science to explain our emotional responses to art; the semiotic processing of art; and the connections between scientific and artistic creativity.

The second topic explores the aesthetics of special categories of art—science-inspired art and eco-art—by exploring such questions as “Does using science as a source for art compromise our appreciation of it?”; “Do we have to understand the science principles behind it in order to respond appropriately?”; and “Does knowing that a work of eco-art actually performs some restorative function change our responses to it?”

ABSTRACTS: click HERE




(5) Ion channels: Integration of Computer Simulations with Experiments. Organizers: C. Mark Maupin (Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; cmmaupin@mines.edu) and Owen McDougal (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University, Boise, ID; owenmcdougal@boisestate.edu).
Currently scheduled for Tuesday morning, 18 June.

Due to the difficulty of crystallizing transmembrane ion channel proteins, the use of computational techniques such as homology modeling, docking calculations, and molecular dynamics are increasingly being used to generate molecular-level information. These computational techniques are rapidly becoming a complementary component to experiment in an effort to unravel ion channel structure, functional, and interactions with ligands. This symposium will address experimental and computational work conducted on ion channels with an emphasis on complimentary techniques that enhance our understanding of ion channels.

ABSTRACTS: click HERE


(6) Management of Endangered Species in the American West: Policy and Practice. Organizer: Rob Mrowka (Center for Biological Diversity; rmrowka@biologicaldiversity.org).
Currently scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, 19 June.

This symposium will focus on the successes and failures of the Endangered Species Act in preserving vulnerable species in the west, with case studies and progress reports.

An optional field trip to Devils Hole and Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge complements this symposium (see Field Trip #2: Devil's Hole and Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge). A second optional field trip to Zion National Park also complements this symposium (see Field Trip #8: Zion National Park: Geology, Natural Resource Management Policy, and Dinosaur Tracks).

ABSTRACTS: click HERE




(7) Innovations and Trends in K-16 STEM Education. Organizers: Larry Rudd (School of Education, Nevada State College; Lawrence.Rudd@nsc.edu) and Aubrey Bonde (Department of Geoscience, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; shirka2@unlv.nevada.edu).
Currently scheduled for Wednesday morning, 19 June.

How can we be more effective in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) education? How will on-line courses, technological gadgetry, and increasingly tight budgets affect teaching-learning dynamics in the sciences? Teachers and science education professionals at all levels are invited to participate in this symposium to share their successful strategies and war stories.

ABSTRACTS: click HERE




(8) Soil-Plant-Water Relationships in Arid Environments. Organizer: Dale Devitt (School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; dev50@clark.nscee.edu).
Program withdrawn by organizer. Papers will appear in the contributed paper session for Ecology, Organismal Biology, and Environmental Sciences Section.

The Nevada System of Higher Education (UNLV, UNR, and Desert Research Institute) is in the final stages of a multiyear NSF-funded project to support infrastructure associated with regional climate change research. One component of this project involves water/ecology. This symposium will focus on the results of these studies, as well as work by other researchers in arid environments. Complementing this symposium is an optional field trip to examine the Mojave Desert transect in the Sheep Range of Southern Nevada—a series of 10-m-tall towers equipped with a wide array of sensors to monitor atmospheric, soil, and plant parameters over time (see Field Trip #7: An Ecological Transect of the Sheep Range – A great Basin Sky Island).


(9) Climate Change, Sustainability, and Water Resources in the Arid West. Organizer: Sajjad Ahmad (Department of Civil Engineering, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; sajjad.ahmad@unlv.edu).
Currently scheduled for Tuesday morning, 18 June.

This symposium will focus on the energy-water nexus in arid portions of North America, in the face of climatic uncertainties. What range of climate change should we expect, and how will natural ecosystems and human communities respond? Optional field trips to Hoover Dam and Nevada Solar One concentrated solar power plant complement this symposium.

ABSTRACTS: click HERE




(10) Dinosaurs and Their Neighbors: Mesozoic Paleontology and Paleogeography of Nevada, Utah, and Adjacent States. Organizer: Josh Bonde (Department of Geoscience, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Joshua.Bonde@unlv.edu).
Currently scheduled for Wednesday morning, 19 June.

Until very recently, dinosaurs were essentially unknown from strata in Nevada. In contrast, Utah is perhaps the epicenter of dinosaur diversity for the entire Milky Way galaxy. On the Nevada side of the state line, that picture has changed dramatically within the past few years. We now have spectacular dinosaur trackways (along with trackways of co-existing protomammals and arthropods) in southern Nevada and also a diverse assemblage of dinosaur body fossils from both southern and central Nevada. Meanwhile, paleontologists in Utah continue to discover new taxa at an amazing rate. This symposium will focus on recent research on Mesozoic fossils, stratigraphy, and paleogeography in Nevada, Utah, and adjacent states. Two optional field trips complement this symposium: (1) an evening hike into Red Rock Canyon National Recreation Area (see Field Trip #5: Evening Hike to Potato Knoll in Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area), and (2) a two-day, post-meeting field trip to Zion National Park and the Johnson Farm Dinosaur Discovery Site in St. George, Utah (see Field Trip #8: Zion National Park: Geology, Natural Resource Management Policy, and Dinosaur Tracks).

ABSTRACTS: click HERE




(11) Recent Advances in Genetics and Cell Biology. Organizer: Pamela Marshall (School of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, Arizona State University at the West Campus; pamela.marshall@asu.edu).
Program withdrawn by organizer. Papers will appear in the contributed paper session for Cell and Molecular Biology.



(12) Boise Extravaganza in Set Theory (BEST). Organizers: Liljana Babinkostova, Andres Caicedo, Samuel Coskey and Marion Scheepers (Department of Mathematics, Boise State Univeristy, Boise, Idaho liljanababinkostova@boisestate.edu).
Currently scheduled for all day Monday, 17 June and Tuesday, 18 June. May extend to Wednesday morning, 19 June.

This program is a continuation of the well-known conference BEST (Boise Extravaganza in Set Theory). BEST focuses on the mathematical discipline called Set Theory, and its applications in other disciplines in Mathematics. BEST was for its first nineteen years hosted in Idaho at Boise State University.

Set Theory is the mathematical foundation for the study of the infinitary objects that routinely arise in Mathematics and its applications, and in the mathematical sciences. Contemporary set theoretic research addresses basic questions about provability, consistency and independence, and the relative strength of postulates or hypotheses in mathematized scientific theories. The methods developed by set theory serve as powerful tools for applications in many other mathematical disciplines, including algebra, analysis, combinatorics, complexity, topology and more.

The invited speakers for this program are successful set theorists from different career stages and will present high level scientific talks in several areas of set theory and its applications. The BEST symposium will also host contributed talks in Set Theory and its applications by participants. Undergraduate and graduate students will also present research accomplishments in these areas.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS:

  • Andres Caicedo (Department of Mathematics, Boise State University)

  • Marian Scheepers (Department of Mathematics, Boise State University)

  • Dr. Todd Eisworth (Ohio University)

  • Dr. Masaru Kada (Osaka Prefecture University, Japan)

  • Dr. Lynne Yengulalp (University of Dayton)

  • Thilo Weinert (University of Bonn, Germany)



(13) International Protected Area Exchange. Organizers: Margaret N. Rees (Vice–Provost for Educational Outreach and Executive Director of Public Lands Institute, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada; peg.rees@unlv.edu) and Allison Brody (Project Manager, Public Lands Institute, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada; allison.brody@unlv.edu.
Currently scheduled for Tuesday afternoon, 18 June.

This symposium invites presentations on advances in understanding protected area management, including conceptual and empirical research results, reviews, case studies, and meta-analyses. Whether study outcomes have global, regional, or local impact, their findings positively contribute to or provide compelling examples of natural or cultural heritage protection.

Collectively around the globe, protected areas secure irreplaceable natural, ecological, and cultural treasure. Without healthy ecosystems, sustained human health and well-being is impossible. Effective management of these protected areas is critical, regardless of their designation, particular objectives, multiple uses, or administrative authorities. Furthermore, it requires balancing the environmental, cultural, economic, and political issues within and surrounding the management area. Approaches to achieving this balance are being creatively developed and applied. Specific vulnerabilities, challenges, and responses vary based on availability of data, geographical location, and other parameters often closely tied to a site’s location (e.g., biome type, political stability, levels of poverty). Modern stressors, such as climate change and increases in urbanization at the wildland–urban interface, require ongoing adaptation in management strategy. However, fundamental to all sustainable protected area management is the adoption of more participatory, inclusive, and equitable models, which consider a variety of benefits and values while utilizing effective partnerships, including with the local community within and adjacent to the area and relevant governance and policy–makers. Designed to facilitate information transfer and foster new connections, this symposium provides a forum for an international exchange of insights and findings related to the cooperative conservation of healthy ecosystems and the services and benefits they provide.

ABSTRACTS: click HERE




(14) Patient–Centered Outcomes Research and Patient Targeted Therapies. Organizers: Francesco Chiappelli (School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California; fchiappelli@dentistry.ucla.edu) and Adrian Bot (Kite Pharma Inc).
Currently scheduled for Tuesday afternoon, 18 June.

Current global trends in health care emphasize patient–centered outcomes research of molecular–targeted evidenced–based interventions. Treatment modalities in medicine, nursing, dentistry and psychotherapy increasingly integrate translational research – going from the patient to the laboratory bench and back to the patient (NIH) – with translational effectiveness – integrating the best available evidence for optimizing evidence–based health care interventions in specific clinical settings (AHRQ). Innovative models of patient targeted therapies are timely and critical. This symposium is dedicated to the dissemination of the current state of knowledge about targeted molecular therapies in the context of patient–centered outcomes research. Its scientific focus will pertain to the patient–centered identification of disease–specific biomarkers for the elucidation of targeted molecular therapies in selected clinical conditions. Specifically, this symposium will present a concerted program of presentations that are aimed to address current, timely and cutting edge research about patient–centered targeted small molecule therapies (both small molecules and biomolecules, with broad therapeutic applicability and benefiting from a patient–centered outcomes), in the context of translating cost- and benefit effectiveness into specific clinical settings.

ABSTRACTS: click HERE




(15) Forensic and Clinical Psychological Science Issues in Antiterrorism: An International Paradigm. Organizer: Ronn Johnson (School of Leadership and Education Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; ronnjohn@ronnjohn.cts.com).
Currently scheduled for Monday afternoon, 17 June.

Acts of terrorism are traumatic incidents that have no international border restrictions. The lessons learned from 9/11 taught Americans that no target is invulnerable to acts of terror. Moreover, successful and thwarted acts of terrorism and reconnaissance response probes have fueled a growing need for mental health professional to expand health safety-related trainings to include behavioral threat assessments related to terrorism. Why, because terrorists use a variety of tactics, techniques, and procedures to achieve their often unstated objectives. Research has consistently demonstrated that Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can be one of the clinical outcomes for terrorism that also potentially results in forensic consequences. At the same time, the speed of globalization fused with ideology has resulted in a need to address issues of radicalization. Unfortunately, there is a non-linear relationship between timely intelligence gathering, acts of terror, and understanding radicalization. The objective of this symposium is to review several areas related to mental health professionals implementing anti-terrorism responses.

Some of the projected symposium paper presentation titles include:

  • Is there a nexus between historical trauma and PTSD vulnerability in military personnel?
  • Evidence-based treatment issues for victims of terrorism
  • Radicalization of prison inmates: An antiterrorism paradigm
  • Can stress inoculation training be used as an evidence-based antiterrorism strategy?
  • Radicalization resistance training as an antiterrorism strategy: Is this a pipe dream?

ABSTRACTS: click HERE




(16) Forensic Psychological Science of Juvenile Fire Setters and Bomb Makers. Organizer: Ronn Johnson (School of Leadership and Education Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; ronnjohn@ronnjohn.cts.com).
Currently scheduled for Monday morning, 17 June.

Juvenile fire setting (JFS) or as it is referred to by the current term, Youthful Misuse of Fire (YMF) has received considerable research attention over the past several decades in public safety. There has been little systematic review of integrated risk assessments and treatment factors for these often diverse clinical groups. For example, what are some the differences between JFS/YMF and bomb makers? How many sessions should a JFS/YMF client receive?   This symposium presents an overview of a variety of risk assessment factors that are of particular relevance to consider for any work done with juvenile fire setters in clinical or forensic settings. The presentation considers the importance of JFS-YMF across a broad array of clinical domains, including developmental, diagnostic, and the prognostic utility anticipated by the release of the DSM-5. National standards and risk assessment levels are examined. The presentation provides a starting place for developing conceptualizations for the diverse assessment and cross-cultural evidenced-based treatment needs for these treatment populations. Preliminary data from the JFS research project of the Burn Institute of San Diego County will be presented.

Some of the projected symposium paper presentation titles include:

  • Use of the DSM-5 with juvenile fire setters and bomb makers
  • Psychological evaluations and risks assessments of juvenile fire setters and bomb makers using the CBCL
  • Clinical and forensic psychological issues in work with Latino/a juvenile fire setters
  • Clinical decision making in the treatment of juvenile fire setters referred by the courts: Transdisciplinary service coordination
  • The process of accessing and assessing research data in community-based juvenile fire setter program: From headaches to nirvana

ABSTRACTS: click HERE




(17) Accelerating Biomedical Discovery with Advanced Molecular Simulation and Computational Biology. Organizer: Dong Xu (Department of Biomedical and Pharmacrutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Idaho State University; dxu@pharmacy.isu.edu).
THIS PROGRAM WAS MERGED WITH #19 TO FORM #21, STRUCTURAL AND COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR NOVEL THERAPEUTICS DEVELOPMENT AND BIOMEDICAL INSIGHTS.




(18) Current Progress in Infectious Disease Research and Therapeutic Interventions. Organizers: Dong Xu (Department of Biomedical and Pharmacrutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Idaho State University; dxu@pharmacy.isu.edu) and Mike Aldape (Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, Boise, Idaho).
Currently scheduled for Wednesday, 19 June.

This research symposium focuses on the current experimental and computational research progress in infectious disease molecular pathology and therapeutic design. The purpose of the symposium is to provide a dynamic forum to facilitate the exchange of research advancements and ideas among infectious disease experts around, and to report the latest discovery and development in the understanding, preventing and inhibiting the most life-threatening, pandemic and drug-resistant pathogens.

ABSTRACTS: click HERE




(19) Structural Insights for the Development of New Therapeutics. Organizers: Todd T. Talley and Dong Xu (Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Idaho State University; talley@pharmacy.isu.edu and dxu@pharmacy.isu.edu).
THIS PROGRAM WAS MERGED WITH #17 TO FORM #21, STRUCTURAL AND COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR NOVEL THERAPEUTICS DEVELOPMENT AND BIOMEDICAL INSIGHTS.




(20) Medicinal Chemistry and Biological Insights for the Treatment of Cancer. Organizers: Todd T. Talley and Nicole Frank (Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Idaho State University; talley@pharmacy.isu.edu and frannic2@pharmacy.isu.edu).
Currently scheduled for Tuesday morning, 18 June.

This symposium focuses on new experimental methods to better understand and combat cancer.  By bringing together researchers from various disciplines involved in the study of cancer we hope to provide a forum for discussion and collaboration in this important field.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS:

  • ()



(21) Structural and Computational Approaches for Novel Therapeutics Development and Biomedical Insights. Organizers: Todd T. Talley and Dong Xu (Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Idaho State University; talley@pharmacy.isu.edu and dxu@pharmacy.isu.edu).
Currently scheduled for Monday, 17 June.
THIS PROGRAM IS A MERGER OF #S 17 AND 19 ABOVE, NEITHER OF WHICH ARE OFFERED AS SEPARATE SYMPOSIA.

During the past decade there has been rapid growth in the number of crystal structures of known drug targets and the advancements of state-of-the-art computational methods. Putting this wealth of information to use requires the skills of researchers from a wide array of fields including biophysics, medicinal chemistry, molecular and computational biology. The goal of this symposium is to facilitate the exchange of ideas and develop collaborations to take advantage of the data and methods now available.

ABSTRACTS: click HERE







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