93rd Annual Meeting
BOISE CENTER on the GROVE
co-located with the
67th Northwest Regional Meeting (NORM 12) of the
AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY
Boise, Idaho
June 24 - 27, 2012


SYMPOSIA


The following symposia are in various stages of planning for the annual meeting. The listings below are tentative and subject to change. New symposia will be added as information is received from the organizers. Check this web site for updated information or e–mail inquiries to aaaspd@sou.edu. If you plan to attend the meeting largely for one symposium, please call 541–552–6869 to confirm its status before committing travel funds.

Please bookmark this page and check back frequently, as this information is frequently updated as new information becomes available.



Index To Symposium Descriptions



(1) Computability and Complexity in Mathematics.

(2) Modeling, Simulation, and Visualization.

(3) Biofuel: Computational Modeling of Cellulose and Cellulase.

(4) Biological Membranes: Interface of Physiology and Computational Biology.

(5) Transport Across Membranes.

(6) Emerging and Re-Emerging Diseases.

(7) Recent Advances in Pharmacology and Toxicology.

(8) Mechanisms of Tumor Progression and Cancer Therapeutics.

(9) Long Term Spaceflight and Health.

(10) Water Resource Management in the Arid West: Historical Perspectives and Emerging Issues.

(11) Expert and Novice Learning in STEM: Exploring Assumptions and Indicators of Success.

(12) Science-Themed Fiction.

(13) Library Science and Archives.

(14) Forensic Psychology in Evaluating a Lone Wolf Terrorist: An Analysis of the Norway Killer.

(15) The Forensic Psychology of Women Death Penalty Cases.

(16) Responses of Sagebrush-Steppe Ecosystems to a Changing Climate.

(17) Public Lands and Democracy: What is the Relationship? PROGRAM CANCELLED BY ORGANIZER

(18) The History of Modern Biology.

(19) Biophysical Insights from Experimental Approaches to Computational Simulation.



Symposium Descriptions


(1) Computability and Complexity in Mathematics. Organizers: Liljana Babinkostova and Marion Sheepers (Department of Mathematics, Boise State Univeristy, Boise, Idaho).
Currently scheduled for Monday all day, Tuesday morning and Wednesday morning, 25, 26 and 27 June.

This program will take advantage of an NSF funded Mathematics Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program that will be in its fourth of eight weeks at Boise State University during the time of the AAAS, Pacific Division conference. The invited speakers for this program are part of the scientific program of the REU, and will present high level scientific talks in the areas of algebra and geometry, with applications to information security and biology. Participating alumni and graduate students will present master's level research accomplishments in these areas. Mathematics REU student teams will also present during this symposium, affording them the opportunity to disseminate the results of their work in a professional forum and giving them the experience of a conference as an example of an event that is part of a professional STEM career. A Tuesday afternoon workshop will feature the use of genome remodeling processes that occur in ciliates as a computing environment to solve mathematical problems.

SPEAKERS:



(2) Modeling, Simulation, and Visualization. Organizers: Tim Andersen (Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Boise State Univrersity, Boise, Idaho; tim@cs.boisestate.edu) and Jeff Habig (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho).
Currently scheduled for Tuesday afternoon, 26 June.

The aim of this symposium is to promote and foster collaboration among Idaho researchers involved in modeling, simulation, visualization and numerical algorithm development in science and engineering applications. A secondary aim is to make researchers aware of computational resources available to them in Idaho to carry out their research.

We invite participation from all Idaho Universities, Idaho National Laboratory and commercial enterprises whose research and development interests involve computational modeling and simulation.

SPEAKERS:
  • Daniel Lobo (Tufts University)

  • Morgan Giddings (Boise State University)

  • Alark Joshi (Boise State University)




(3) Biofuel: Computational Modeling of Cellulose and Cellulase. Organizer: C. Mark Maupin (Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado; cmmaupin@mines.edu).
Currently scheduled for Tuesday morning, 26 June.

The ever increasing worldwide demands for energy, along with uncertain petroleum sources and the possibility of global climate change, has dictated the necessity for our nation to develop a sustainable and renewable alternative to fossil transportation fuel. Biofuels derived from lignocellulosic biomass are attractive alternatives due to the vast infrastructure already in place for the distribution of a liquid transportation fuel, and the fact that fuel derived from cellulose does not compete with human and livestock food resources. Furthermore, since cellulose is the most abundant renewable biopolymer on earth the feedstock for cellulosic biofuels is almost inexhaustible, and the utilization of cellulose for liquid fuel can achieve zero net carbon dioxide emission thereby making it a crucial component in our efforts to reduce green house gases.

Cellulosic biofuels are created by hydrolyzing cellulose to glucose and subsequently fermenting the glucose to make biofuel. Several major obstacles remain with regard to the viability of cellulosic biofuels including overcoming the natural resistance of cellulose to enzymatic depolymerization, known as biomass recalcitrance, which is primarily responsible for the high cost of cellulosic biofuels. To formulate ways to overcome biomass recalcitrance, a basic understanding of the substrate and enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of cellulose are needed. The enzymatic driven hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose to glucose is regulated by three different cellulases: endocellulase (EG), exocellulase (cellobiohydrolase, CBHI and CBHII), and β-glucosidase (BG).

This symposium will focus on the modeling of the substrate and each of the three enzymes in an effort to evaluate their ability to bind substrate and catalyze the hydrolysis reaction.

SPEAKERS:



(4) Biological Membranes: Interface of Physiology and Computational Biology. Organizer: James R. Groome (Department of Biology, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho; groojame@isu.edu).
Currently scheduled for Tuesday morning, 26 June.

Many of the critical functions affecting physiological processes and eliciting pathophysiological conditions occur across biological membranes.  These include a wide variety of ligand to receptor interactions that regulate growth and development, systemic, and nervous system functions.  Defects in these signal transduction pathways are causal to many forms of cancer, genetic defects, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Modern approaches to the study of biological membranes include the use of transgenic organism, heterologous expression systems, electrophysiology, and computational approaches such as homology modeling of proteins and their interactions with putative ligands.  Molecular and computational approaches have greatly expanded our capacity for studying the diversity of proteins that regulate membrane transport, receptor interaction and ion channel activaty.

In this symposium we well focus on modern approaches to the role of membrane proteins in signal transduction for cells that are important targets in disease, and that present attractive targets for genetic or pharmacological intervention.

SPEAKERS:



(5) Transport Across Membranes. Organizers: Daniel Fologea (Department of Physics, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; Daniel-Fologea@boisestate.edu) and James R. Groome (Department of Biology, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho; groojame@isu.edu).
Currently scheduled for Tuesday afternoon, 26 June.

Highly selective molecular transport through biological membranes is essential for life. Directed flows of ions and macromolecules are main pieces of complex life-sustaining processes such as intra and inter-cellular communication, transport of molecules, ions, and nutrients, energy production, motility, information storage and transmission, and maintenance of electrochemical gradients. Specific components of the transport mechanisms play key roles as targets for viruses and pharmaceuticals, and their malfunctioning often lead to various diseases, even death.

The main goal of this symposium is to shed more light on the mechanistic of transport across biological membranes, and to improve our understanding with respect to physiological, biological, and medical relevance. This symposium is open to researchers, students, and professionals interested in this fascinating inter-disciplinary field.

SPEAKERS:
  • Daniel Fologea (Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho)

  • James R. Groome(Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)


(6) Emerging and Re-Emerging Diseases. Organizer: Michael J. Aldape (Research Scientist, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Research and Development Service, Infectious Diseases Research Group, Boise, Idaho; mike.aldape@va.gov and maldape32@hotmail.com).
Currently scheduled for Wednesday morning, 27 June.

Well-characterized pathogens are now evolving into more virulent organisms, while new-fangled diseases are constantly being identified world-wide. While many infectious diseases have been effectively controlled with the help of decades of scientific research, the constant burdens created by these long-standing and novel infectious organisms has demanded the need for further research into disease pathogenesis, virulence factors, patterns of transmission, host susceptibility and drug resistance. In addition, the development of novel technologies and therapeutic interventions such as vaccines and diagnostic procedures are also essential to controlling the advancement and spread of these diseases. This program will provide a scientific platform for the expert review of several pathogens associated with current and reemerging infectious diseases. Issues presented will include detailed mechanisms associated with the pathogenesis, novel strategies in controlling infectious disease, as well as clinical updates. This symposium is designed for undergraduate and graduate students, internists, family physicians, infectious diseases specialists, nurses, pharmacists, and others who research or manage patients with infectious diseases.

SPEAKERS:
  • Stephanie Hamilton (Graduate Student, Boise VA Medical Center, Boise, Idaho)

  • Anna Kolodziejek (Post-Doc, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho)

  • Lavanva Vempati (Graduate Student, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

  • Kenneth Cornell (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

(7) Recent Advances in Pharmacology and Toxicology. Organizer: Kristen Mitchell (Department of Biology, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; kristenmitchell@boisestate.edu).
Currently scheduled for Wednesday morning, 27 June.

The development of novel therapeutic strategies requires a detailed understanding of mechanisms that regulate homeostasis, along with an appreciation of the balance that exists between the therapeutic and toxic effects of chemical compounds.  This session will focus on recent advances in understanding the pharmacological and toxicological effects of drugs, chemicals and environmental contaminants. Investigators are invited to present research on the identification of targets for new drug development, new drug screening strategies, and novel mechanisms of drug action.  Emphasis will also be placed on the identification of mechanisms of toxicity for drugs, chemicals and environmental contaminants.

SPEAKERS:
  • Kristen Mitchell (Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

(8) Mechanisms of Tumor Progression and Cancer Therapeutics. Organizer: Cheryl Jorcyk (Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; cjorcyk@boisesstate.edu).
Currently scheduled for Tuesday afternoon, 26 June.

Cancer is a large group of different diseases, all involving uncontrolled growth of cells in the body. During tumor progression, cells proliferate, form malignant tumors, invade to nearby parts of the body and metastasize, or spread, to more distant parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. This program will provide scientific presentations addressing different mechanisms of tumor progression and metastasis, as well as mechanistic discussions on established and emerging cancer therapeutics. This symposium is designed for all types of biomedical researchers, undergraduate and graduate students, physicians and oncologists, nurses, pharmacists, and others who research or manage patients with cancer.

SPEAKERS:
  • Cheryl Jorcyk (Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

  • Minoti Hiremath (Research Faculty, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

  • Randy Ryan (Research Faculty, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

  • Denise Wingett (Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

(9) Long Term Spaceflight and Health. Organizers: Julie Oxford (Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; joxford@boisestate.edu) and Barbara Morgan (Distinguished Educator, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; BarbaraMorgan@boisestate.edu).
Currently scheduled for Monday morning, 25 June.

Like every other living creature we know of, humans evolved at the bottom of a gravity well. We take the Earth's tug for granted, and so do our bodies. So it's not surprising that our bodies behave oddly in orbit. What is surprising is that humans turn out to adapt remarkably well to zero-g (more precisely, microgravity).Weightlessness itself is the most important and the most obvious influence on life in space. Weightlessness complicates the business of daily life, from eating to sleeping. And space adaptation involves some very complex changes in the human body, both short-term and long-term. These changes can cause health problems both in space and on return to Earth. There are other factors, too. Outside the protective shield of the Earth's atmosphere, astronauts have to contend with high radiation levels. These have long-term effects: an increase in the risk of cancer in later life, for example. This symposium is designed for anyone interested in the effects of microgravity on physiological systems including cardiovascular, balance, musculoskeletal, and vision. Research opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty will also be discussed.

SPEAKERS:
  • Barbara Morgan (Distinguished Educator, Teacher-Astronaut, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

  • Liliana Mellor (Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

  • Benjamin Davis (Research Technician, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

  • Jake Goyden (Graduate Student, Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

  • Tommy K. Smith (Graduate Student, Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

  • Julie Oxford (Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

(10) Water Resource Management in the Arid West: Historical Perspectives and Emerging Issues. Organizer: Scott E. Lowe (Department of Economics, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; scottlowe@boisestate.edu).
Currently scheduled for Tuesday morning, 26 June.

The symposium will encompass state of the art research related to water resources management in the arid western United States. The research presented in this symposium will address the impacts that future climate change predictions may have on managed and unmanaged water resources, and the resulting economic implications of these changes; the impact of institutional constraints (variations in prior appropriation water rights laws,) on water resource management; urban, agricultural and industrial adaptation to uncertainty in water supply; the role that major water infrastructure projects have played in addressing the variability and uncertainty in water availability, and the political economy of the investments in the projects; and the impact of property rights for interrelated surface and groundwater resources management.

SPEAKERS:



(11) Expert and Novice Learning in STEM: Exploring Assumptions and Indicators of Success. Organizers: Louis S. Nadelson (College of Education, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; louisnadelson@boisestate.edu) and Carl A. Maida (UCLA Schools of Dentistry and Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California; cmaida@ucla.edu).
Currently scheduled for Monday afternoon, 25 June.

As the focus on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) professions increases, there is a parallel demand to examine STEM learning and teaching and the relevant cognitive and affective variables. Learning variables can be both domain specific and domain general, thus assessment of these parameters also need to be considered in terms of the context of STEM. Yet to explore the developments of learning and teaching in STEM, domain specific assessments need to be created and utilized. This session will engage audience members, including K-14 teachers and science educators, and presenters in a professional learning community experience. The intent is to provide an opportunity for collaborative inquiry on current issues and future trends related to STEM teaching and learning. Panelists will discuss best practices, including cognitive and affective approaches, together with assessment and measurement that would provide an empirical foundation for these new approaches. The following questions may be used to guide the learning community discussion of STEM teaching and learning:

  • What do we know about how people learn STEM?
  • What psychological variables – cognitive and affective – are associated with learning?
  • What assessments are available to measuring the variables associated with how people learn STEM?
  • What are some burning questions regarding STEM teaching and learning? Keep in mind that what seems obvious may have little or no empirical foundation.
  • Where are the gaps in measures of STEM teaching and learning?
  • What does successful STEM teaching and learning look like and what is the empirical evidence documenting the effectiveness.
SPEAKERS:
  • Louis S. Nadelson (Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)

  • Carl A. Maida (University of California, Los Angeles, California)

  • Kimberly D. Tanner (San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California)

(12) Science-Themed Fiction. Organizer: Robert Louis Chianese (Department of English (Emeritus), California State University Northridge, Northridge, California; robert.chianese@csun.edu).
Currently scheduled for Tuesday afternoon, 26 June.

We are quite familiar with the popular genre of science fiction, but we give much less attention to science-themed fiction, works of literature in the form of novels and short stories, that derive some or much of their content from science ideas or figures. Issues and themes from astronomy to zoology--including cosmology, biology, ecology, genetics, medicine, mathematics--can form key elements of both historical and contemporary fiction. This symposium explores the use of science by fiction writers and the more general theoretical connections between literature and science.

Papers on this topic should be submitted to Prof. Robert Louis Chianese, Emeritus Professor of English (CSUN), the symposium organizer.

Also, we would like to hold a reading of original works of science-themed fiction sometime during the conference and in conjunction with the symposium. Writers should send a copied passage of their work with some explanatory information about its science content. They would need to be present to read their work if selected for presentation.

SPEAKERS:



(13) Library Science and Archives. Organizers: Crystal Goldman (Scholarly Communications Librarian, Dr. Martin Luthere King, Jr. Library, San Jose State University, San Jose, California; crystal.goldman@sjsu.edu) and Michal Walden (Archivist, Idaho State Archives, Division of the Idaho State Historical Siciety, Boise, Idaho; michal.walden@ishs.idaho.gov).
Currently scheduled for all day Monday, 25 June.

The last decade has seen numerous advances in the fields of Library Science and Archival Science, while at the same time existing services needed to be maintained, improved, and streamlined. Difficult budget times that have affected not only operational resources but also grant opportunities,  have advanced the need for innovation and the adoption of new techniques and technologies.

This symposium will focus on numerous subjects of import to libraries and archives. Not only will it allow a forum for showcasing new approaches to standard services such as instruction and reference, but it will also spotlight emerging issues with digitization projects, electronic records programs, and institutional repositories. Open access publishing in the sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities will be discussed as a way to alleviate costs and increase dissemination of intellectual property. Institutional repositories, open access publishing, and scholarly communications bring to light the vital need for education about author’s rights and copyright. Both theoretical and practical approaches to these topics will be presented.

SPEAKERS:
  • Crystal Goldman (Scholarly Communications Librarian, San Jose State University, San Jose, California

  • Michal Walden (Archivist, Idaho State Archives, Boise, Idaho)

  • Julia Stringfellow (Archivist/Librarian and Assistant Professor, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho)
  • Erin Passehl (Digital Collections Librarian/Archivist and Assistant Professor, Western Oregon University

  • Silke Higgins (Digital Initiatives Librarian, San Jose State University, San Jose, California)

(14) Forensic Psychology in Evaluating a Lone Wolf Terrorist: An Analysis of the Norway Killer. Organizer: Ronn Johnson (School of Leadership and Education Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; ronnjohn@cts.com).
Currently scheduled for Monday morning, 25 June.

The Norway homegrown lone wolf terrorism case contained several forensic psychological factors. One of the most immediate concerns was whether or not the accused is capable of standing for trial. Assuming that he is, the next set of forensic psychological questions is related to what was his mental state at the time of the offense. Is it expected that he might be able to withstand the course of a trial without psychologically decompensating? If convicted or not convicted, then what role would his mental state play in determining conditions for his sentencing or release. The Norway killings case provides a forensic psychology framework for the science-based application of various clinical tools. In addition, there is an opportunity for examining the extent to which these psychological tools meet Daubert standards. The proposed symposium presentations examine forensic mental health issues related to the Norway killing case with emphasis on his manifesto. Papers are presented in twos followed immediately by a “counter viewpoint” facilitated by discussants. The presentation titles are:

  • Overview and questions for forensic psychology in homegrown lone wolf terrorism cases
  • Opposing forensic psychological reports on the Norway Killer case
  • Forensic psychology cultural and ethical considerations in homegrown lone wolf terrorism cases
  • Behavioral disorders or mental impairment “not” contained in the proposed DSM-5
  • Care of the mental health professional in homegrown terrorism cases
  • Identifying, securing, organizing and reviewing mental health data in homegrown lone wolf terrorism case
SPEAKERS:
  • Kristen Grieder (Graduate Student, University of San Diego, San Diego, California)

  • Kristin Dascanio (Graduate Student, University of San Diego, San Diego, California)

  • Chris Wehrle (Graduate Student, University of San Diego, San Diego, California)
  • LeeAnne Kuang (Graduate Student, University of San Diego, San Diego, California)

  • Lauren Stein (Graduate Student, University of San Diego, San Diego, California)
  • Erica Bessen (Graduate Student, University of San Diego, San Diego, California)

(15) The Forensic Psychology of Women Death Penalty Cases. Organizer: Ronn Johnson (School of Leadership and Education Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, California; ronnjohn@cts.com).
Currently scheduled for Monday afternoon, 25 June.

Death penalty cases often contain psychological mitigating factors. For example, Theresa Lewis was a death penalty case where the aforementioned forensic psychological factors were relevant. Lewis was the 12th woman to be executed in the United States since capital punishment was reinstated in 1976. She was convicted in a murder for hire incident but the two male co-conspirators received life sentences. The Theresa Lewis case is significant for several forensic psychological reasons. The questions raised in the Lewis case fueled a scientific interest in evaluating to what extent were forensic psychology issues present in the other women death penalty cases. The proposed symposia include paper presentations that examine psychological issues related to the 12 most recent women death penalty cases. Papers are presented in twos followed immediately by a “counter viewpoint” facilitated by discussants.

The proposed presentation titles are:

  • Overview of questions for forensic psychology in women death penalty cases
  • Can a forensic psychological report be crafted in the most recent women death penalty cases?
  • Forensic mental health cultural and ethical considerations in death penalty cases
  • Forensic psychology in select female death penalty cases I
  • Forensic psychology in select female death penalty cases II
  • Forensic psychology in select female death penalty cases III
SPEAKERS:
  • Kristen Grieder (Graduate Student, University of San Diego, San Diego, California)

  • Kristin Dascanio (Graduate Student, University of San Diego, San Diego, California)

  • Chris Wehrle (Graduate Student, University of San Diego, San Diego, California)
  • LeeAnne Kuang (Graduate Student, University of San Diego, San Diego, California)

  • Lauren Stein (Graduate Student, University of San Diego, San Diego, California)
  • Erica Bessen (Graduate Student, University of San Diego, San Diego, California)

(16) Responses of Sagebrush-Steppe Ecosystems to a Changing Climate. Organizers: Kevin Feris and Marie-Anne De Graaff (Department of Biology, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; kevinferis@boisestate.edu and marie-annedegraaff@boisestate.edu).
Currently scheduled for Monday afternoon, 25 June.

Semi-arid and arid ecosystems cover approximately 53,000 km2 of land, estimated to be more than 35% of Earth’s land surface and equivalent of the areas of North America, South America, Europe, and Australia combined (McGinnies et al. 1968). Additionally, these ecosystems are estimated to contain 33% of above and below ground terrestrial carbon reserves (Stone et al., 2008), play important roles in hydrologic and nutrient cycles, support diverse plant communities, and endangered species.   In the U.S., semi-arid ecosystems comprise over 60 million hectares in land mass (West and Young, 2000). Given the large spatial extent of these ecosystems, small changes in ecosystem, community, and population level dynamics may have large ramifications for continental scale responses to climate change.

Current rapid increases in greenhouse gas emissions are expected to lead to warming and altered precipitation regimes in the semi-arid ecosystems of the Intermountain West (IPCC, 2007). These changes will alter: terrestrial pools and fluxes of carbon and nutrients, the coupling between plant communities and the hydrologic cycle, and dynamic plant-animal and animal-animal community interactions.

This session will explore the intricate and interactive responses of semi-arid sagebrush-steppe ecosystems to changes in climate forcing factors.

SPEAKERS:




(18) The History of Modern Biology. Organizer: Donald J. McGraw (Ephraim, Utah; donaldmcgraw@mac.com; http://web.mac.com/donaldmcgraw/Dr.DJM/Welcome.html).
Currently scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, 27 June.

The History and Philosophy of Science Section of the Pacific Division of AAAS invites papers for presentation as either talks (preferred) or posters. All areas of the history of modern biology (1953 and beyond) will be given preference, but other time periods will also be considered. Both senior historians and students are welcome. Please contact Dr. Donald J. McGraw, Chair, HPS Section, as soon as possible at his email address: donaldmcgraw@mac.com.

SPEAKERS:



(19) Biophysical Insights from Experimental Approaches to Computational Simulations. Organizer: Dong Xu (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho; dxu@boisestate.edu).
Currently scheduled for Wednesday morning, 27 June.

This symposium focuses on the experimental and computational methods used in studying the conformations and dynamics of biological molecules and systems. The purpose of the symposium is to provide a dynamic forum to engage scientists across the nation, particularly from the Pacific Northwest region, in a dialogue about the latest advance in biophysical and biomedical research, and the state-of-the-art techniques used in the research.

SPEAKERS:





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