AAAS, Pacific Division

92nd Annual Meeting
including the
7th World Congress on Mummy Studies
UNIVERSITY of SAN DIEGO
San Diego, CA
June 12 - 16, 2011


SYMPOSIA


The following symposia are in various stages of planning for the annual meeting. The listings below are tentative and subject to change. New symposia will be added as information is received from the organizers. Check this web site for updated information or e–mail inquiries to aaaspd@sou.edu. If you plan to attend the meeting largely for one symposium, please call 541–552–6869 to confirm its status before committing travel funds.

Please bookmark this page and check back frequently, as this information is frequently updated as new information becomes available.



Index To Symposium Descriptions

WCMSThis symposium is part of the World Congress on Mummy Studies program.

(1) WCMSApplied Ethics of Ancient Mummy Research.

(2) WCMSMummy Research in the Electronic Age.

(3) WCMSTechnical Studies on the Head of an Egytpian Child Mummy.

(4) WCMSState-of-the-Art Ancient Mummy Research.

(5) WCMSImaging of Ancient Mummies. symposium withdrawn from program

(6) WCMSMexican Mummy Studies.

(7) WCMSHuman Leishmaniasis in Mummified Remains: From Iconographical Sources to Modern Day Techniques.

(8) WCMSHuman Experimental Mummification.

(9) Alternative Energy. symposium withdrawn from program

(10) Geophysical Turbulance.

(11) Panama Canal Expansion.

(12) 7thAnnual Symposium on Materials Science and Nanotechnology.

(13) Antarctic Ice Is Nice.

(14) Fragile-X Syndrome: Advances In Our Understanding of a Common Cause of Retardation and Autism.

(15) The Second Law of Thermodynamics: Status and Challenges.

(16) Quantum Retrocausation: Theory and Experment.

(17) Music and the Sciences: Synergies Among Musical Arts, Math, Science, and Engineering.

(18) United States and World's Fairs.

(19) The Forensic Science of Clinical Mental Health in Death Penalty Cases: Theresa Lewis Case.

(20) The Changing Role of the Research University in K—12 Science Education.

(21) Pathways to Science: Promoting Inquuiry-Based Learning Beyond the Classroom.

(22) Don't Sign Your Life Away: Author's Rights, Scientific Publishing, Digital Repositories, and the Case for Open Access.

(23) New Humanities and Science Convergences: Poetry and Science.

(24) Literature and Science: Exploring the Confluence.

(25) Science Education and Civic Engagement.

(26) WCMSaDNA and Associated Biomolecules.

(27a) WCMSPrincess Takabuti – Analysis, Interpretation, and Visualization.

(27b) WCMSFacial Analysis and Depictin of Preserved Remains.

(28) WCMSThe Rio Muerto Project: Mummies of the Tiwanaku Culture from Moquegua, Peru.

(29) WCMSStudies on an Old Kingdom Mummy.

(30) WCMSHeart Disease and Atherosclerosis in Ancient Egyptian Mummies.

(31) WCMSMummies as Cultural Heritage.

(32) WCMSA Multidisciplinary Collaboratiion for Tissue Analysis: The Case of Kwäday Dän Ts'ínchi.

(33) WCMSHair in Archaeology.

WCMSThis symposium is part of the World Congress on Mummy Studies program.


Symposium Descriptions

(1) Applied Ethics of Ancient Mummy Research. Organizers: Niels Lynnerup (Department of Forensic Medicine, Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark) and Frank Rühli (Head of the Swiss Mummy Project, Institute of Anatomy, University of Zurich, Switzerland).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Sunday, 12 June.

Tbis symposium includes presentations on the ethical considerations of mummy research and display from diverse viewpoints. The historical and theoretical backgrounds are covered, and an ethical framework is proposed.

SPEAKERS:

  • Frank Rühli and Niels Lynnerup, Introduction.

  • Lonfat, Kreissl, Niels Lynnerup, and Frank Rühli, Theoretical and Historical Background.

  • Kaufman and Frank Rühli, Stakeholder Theory.

  • Niels Lynnerup, Who Decides What: Ethical Committees, Local Population, Politicians, Lawyers, or Scientists?

  • Salima Ikram, An Egyptian Perspective.

  • Pauline Asingh, Ethical Considerations When Displaying Mummies for a New Museum.

  • Frank Rühli, Lonfat, Kreissl, Kaufmann, and Niels Lynnerup, Proposal for an Ethical Framework.


(2) Mummy Research in the Electronic Age. Organizers: S.J. Wolfe (Senior Cataloger and Serials Specialist, Ameerican Antiqurian Society, Australia) and Jasmine Day (Discipline of Anthropology and Sociology, University of Western Australia).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Tuesday, 14 June.

This symposium covers the recent digitization of many 19th century periodicals that have revealed a flood of mummy fiction, including poetry, plays, and novels.

SPEAKERS:

  • David A. Rawson, Introduction: New Age of Research: Digitization and Electronic Access.

  • S.J. Wolfe, The Mythology of Mummy Paper: Deconstructing an Urban Legend.

  • Jasmine Day, The Mummy Speaks: An Interdisciplinary Study of the Mummy in Literature, Theater, and Politics.



(3) Technical Studies on the Head of an Egyptian Child Mummy. Organizers: Anita Petty (Digital Operations, 3M Unitek, Albuquerque, NM; anitapetty@comcast.net) and Marvin Rowe (Science Program, Texas A&M University (Qatar campus) and Conservation Lab, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Tuesday, 14 June.

This symposium presents the results of analysis of the head of an Egyptian child mummy collected from Egypt during the 1920 Shelton Expeditioin. Included will be the chemical analysis of the resin on the wrapping, the radiocarbon dating by non-destructive plasma oxidation, and X-ray fluorescence of the head.

SPEAKERS:

  • Dave Seapy, Adel Saied, Marvin Rowe, and Anita Petty, Chemical Analysis of the Resin on Wrappings of a Late Period Egyptian Mummy.

  • Marvin Rowe, Karen Steelman, Jerry King, and Anita Petty, Radiocarbon Dating of a Late Period Egyptian Mummy Using Plasma Oxidation.

  • Marvin Rowe, Anita Petty, and Mark Mackenzie, Non-destructive X-ray Fluorescence of the Head of an Egyptian Child Mummy.

  • Corey Ragsdale, Anthony Koehl, and Heather Edgar, RProfile Facial Thickness Confidence Intervals Applied to a Juvenile Mummy.

  • Heather Edgar and Shara Bailey, Dental Morphology of a Juvenile Mummy from the Shelton Expedition: Observations and Measurements Made from CT Scans and Stereolithography.


(4) State-of-the-Art Ancient Mummy Research. Organizers: Frank Rühli (Head of the Swiss Mummy Project, Institute of Anatomy, University of Zurich, Switzerland), Albert Zink (Head of the EURAC Institute for Mummies and the Iceman, European Academy of Bolzano/Bozen, Italy), and Niels Lynnerup (Department of Forensic Medicine, Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Wednesday, 15 June.

Ancient Mummies have been examined for centuries. The enormous ongoing advance of examination modalities allows researchers to expand their studies. The aim of this symposium is to review the current "gold-standard" for scientific studies of ancient mummies and to predict future developments, both in terms of examination standards as well as possible "high-end" single case methodologies. Presentations range from high-resolution imaging and histology to coprolites and stable isotopes.

SPEAKERS:

  • Frank Rühli, Albert Zink and Niels Lynnerup, Introduction.

  • Salima Ikram, Macroscopy/Mummification.

  • Frank Rühli and Niels Lynnerup, Imaging (MRI, CT).

  • Frank Rühli, Wanek, et. al., High-resolution Imaging (e.g. Micro-CT).

  • Niels Lynnerup, et. al., 3D-Analyses.

  • Fornaciari, et. al., Histology.

  • Albert Zink, Frank Rühli, et. al., Molecular Techniques.

  • Reinhardt, et. al., Coprolites.

  • Roger Seiler, Frank Rühli, et. al., Dental Studies.

  • Andrew S. Wilson, et. al., Stable Isotopes.

  • Wilfried Rosendahl, Heather Gill-Freyking, et. al., Mummy Exhibitions/Church Mummies.

  • Albert Zink, et. al., Mummy Preservations.




(6) Mexican Mummy Studies. Organizers: Josephina Mansilla and Ilán Leboreiro (Dirección de Antropologia Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Anthropología e Historia (INAH), México D.F., México, México, DF).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Thursday, 16 June.

Researchers from Mexico will cover the latest research on Mexican mummies in this symposium.

SPEAKERS:

  • Enrique Chacón Soria, Incidents in the Sierra Tarahumara.

  • Ilán Leboreiro and Josefina Mansilla, The "Why" of the Mortuary Context of Mexican Mummies.

  • Josefina Mansilla and Ilán Leboreiro, Brief Overview about the Mexican Mummies.

  • Josefina Mansilla and Ilán Leboreiro, Mexico's Most Ancient Mummy.

  • Cristina Valdiosera, Colin Smith, Morten Rasmussen, Victor Moreno, Eske Willerlev, Ilán Leboreiro, and Josefina Mansilla, Ancient DNA from Mummified Tissue in Mexico: A Case Study for the Early Colonization of the Americas.

  • Leticia González, Josefina Mansilla, Sandra Pompa, Marco Antonio Rodriguez, and Ilán Leboreiro, Traditions of the Ancient Northern Nexican Desert: Fur-wrapped and Flexed Positioned Mummies of Infant Cadavars.

  • Carmen Pijoan, Pedro Bosch, Carlos Flores, Josefina Mansilla, Ilán Leboreiro, and María Teresa Mendendez-Taboada, Characterization of Mummy Hair at the Nanometric Level through Atomic Force Microscoopy.

  • María Teresa Menendez-Taboada, Trace Elements in Ancient Tarahumara Mummy Hair.

  • Ana Serrano and Mariel Durán, Analysis of the Genetic and Historical Context of Two Prehispanic Mummies from Mexico: Phylogeography as an Approach to Complement the Understanding of Past Populations.




(7) Human Leishmaniasis in Mummified Remains: From Iconographical Sources to Modern Day Techniques. Organizers: Andreas G. Nerlich (Institute for Pathology, Klinikum München–Bogenhausen, München, Germany) and Raffella Bianucci (Laboratory of Criminalistic Sciences, Department of Anatomy, Pharmacology and Legal Medicine, University of Turin, Italy).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Tuesday, 14 June.

This symposium includes an overview of the current microbiology of present-day leishmaniasis as both a local and systemic disease dependent on the parasite strain. Molecular investigations on modern strains will provide first clues as to the origin and potential evolution of the pathogens. The symposium includes presentations on the most recent findings of Old and New World leishmaniasis in mummies and skeletonized human remains, shedding light on the distribution and strain differences during antiquity..

SPEAKERS:

  • Gabriele Schönian, Mjolecular Phylogeny, Taxonomy and Evolution of Leishmania.

  • Reginaldo Pecanha Brazil and José D. Andrade Filho, Evolutionary Origin of Phlebotominae (Diptera: Psychodidae) Based on Fossil Evidence and Potential Evolution of Host-Leishmania Interactions in the Old and the New World.

  • Kelly M. Harkins, The Unresolved Origins of Leishmaniasis: A Phylogenetic Perspective.

  • Andreas G. Nerlich, Ancient Visceral Leishmaniasis in the Nile Valley – Possible Implications for the Spread of the Pathogen.

  • Raffaella Bianucci, Andreas G. Nerlich, Abigail Bouwman, Charlotte Roberts, Gabriele Schoenian, Anna Trisciuoglio, Carsten M. Pusch, Markus Ball, Beatrice Bachmeier, Ezio Frroglio, Valentina Giuffra, and Gino Fornaciari, First Evidence of Leishmania infantum/Myobacterium tuberculosis co-infection from Renaissance Europe.

  • Alfredo Altamirano, Iconography of Mochica Leishmaniasis in Ancient Peru.

  • Alfredo Altamirano, Review of Paleopathology of Leishmaniasis in South America.


(8) Human Experimental Mummification. Organizers: Frank Rühli (Head of the Swiss Mummy Project, Institute of Anatomy, University of Zurich, Switzerland) and Christina Papageorgopoulou (Research Assistant, Institute of Anatomy, University of Zurich).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Tuesday, 14 June.

This Artificial mummification methods have been developed in many parts of the world with that of the Ancient Egyptians being among the most successful. Nevertheless, little effort has been made to explore this process on an experimental basis. This symposium aims to present the results of a large project which tried experimentally to reconstruct the ancient Egyptian mummification method by applying evidence-based diagnostic criteria and state-of-the-art methodology, and to bring researchers together who have conducted similar experiments on animal and human tissues.

SPEAKERS:

  • Frank Rühli and Christina Papageorgopoulou, Introduction.

  • Bob Brier, Human Mummification: The Experimental Approach.

  • Christina Papageorgopoulou, Natallia Shved, and Frank J. Rühli, Post-mortem Alterations of Mummified Human Tissue under Experimental Setting.

  • Christina Papageorgopoulou, Natallia Shved, Johann Wanek, Giovanni Colacicco, and Frank Rühli, Modeling Ancient Egyptian Mummification Method Using Evidence-based Methodology: Histological Analysis.

  • Stefanie Panzer, Johann Wanek, Christina Papageorgopoulou, Natallia Shved, Giovanni Colacicco, and Frank J. Rühli, Modeling Ancient Egyptian Mummification Method Using Evidence-based Methodology: MRI, CT Analysis.

  • Natallia Shved, Christina Papageorgopoulou, Katja Paulsen, Cordula Haas, and Frank J. Rühli, Swiss Mummy Project: Experimental Human Tissue Mummification and Post-mortem DNA Degradation.

  • Albert Zink, et. al., Experimental Mummification of Ötzi 3.

  • Heather Gill–Freyking and Colleen Heally, Experimental Archaeology for the Interpretatin of Taphobnomy Related to Bog Bodies: Lessons Learned from Two Projects Undertaken a Decade Apart.

  • Salima Ikram, Sheep and Cats and Cows, Oh My!: Experimental Mummification.





(10) Geophysical Turbulance. Organizers: Frank G. Jacobitz (Mechanical Engineering Program, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; jacobitz@sandiego.edu), Harinda Joseph S. Fernando (Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN; Fernando.10@nd.edu), and Kai Schneider (Laboratoire de Modélisation et Simulation Numérique en Mécanique and Centre de Mathématiques et d’Informatique, Université de Provence, 39, rue Joliot-Curie, 13453 Marseille Cedex 13, France; kschneid@cmi.univ-mrs.fr).
Sponsored by the Pacific Division sections on Engineering, Technology and Applied Sciences, and Atmospheric and Oc eanographic Sciences.
Currently scheduled for Tuesday, 14 June.

Turbulent motion in the geophysical environment is important for transport and mixing processes of natural and anthropogenic quantities, including momentum, heat, nutrients, or pollutants. In turn, velocity shear, density stratification, and system rotation present in the geophysical system affect properties of the turbulent motion. This symposium invites participants from a variety of backgrounds and employing various techniques to share their insights into the dynamics of turbulence.

SPEAKERS:

  • Herman Clercx (Eindhoven), Invited Speaker: Turbulent Rotating Convection.

  • Kyle Brucker (SAIC, San Diego), Turbulence in the Near Wake of Strongly Stratified Flow around a Sphere.

  • Marko Princevac (UC Riverside), Buoyant Plume Rise in Urban Environment.

  • Sam Pournazeri (UC Riverside), Ground Level Concentration Measurements from Urban Sources.

  • Trevor Maynard (UC Riverside), Fire Pulsation and Interactions of Two Fire Fronts.

  • Christian Bartolome (UC Riverside), Modeling of Superfog Formation.

  • Brandn Gazzolo (UC Riverside), Modeling of Effects of Sound Barriers on Dispersion of Freeway Pollutants.

  • Hansheng Pan(UC Riverside), Interactiions of Building Flows and Influence of Tall Buildings on Ground Level Concentration.

  • Kai Schneider (Marseille), Scale-dependent and Directional Statistics in Anisotropic Turbulence using Wavelets.

  • Frank Jacobitz (San Diego), Helical Properties of Homogeneous Turbulence.

  • Joe Fernando (University of Notre Dame), Monday Noon Public Lecture:



(11) Panama Canal Expansion. Organizer: Anne Sturz (Department of Marine Science and Environmental Studies, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; asturz@sandiego.edu).
Sponsored by the section on General and Interdisciplinary Studies.
Currently scheduled for Monday, 13 June.

The Panama Canal is a cornerstone of the global transportation system, connecting the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean across the Isthmus of Panama. The original canal was completed and opened for shipping in 1914. Thirteen to fourteen thousand vessels use the Canal every year. Commercial transportation through the Canal represents approximately 5% of the world trade. The Canal has a work force of approximately nine thousand employees and operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The Panama Canal Authority is undertaking construction of new locks, new water reutilization basins, plus widening and deepening existing navigational channels. Anticipated completion of the Panama Canal Expansion is in 2014, marking the 100th anniversary of Canal operations. Speakers contributing to his symposium will discuss the history, geological parameters and sociological implications of the Canal.

SPEAKERS:

  • J. David Rogers (Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO), General Overview of the History of the Panama Canal.

  • J. David Rogers (Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO), Landslide History of the Canal.

  • Eldon Gath (Senior Consultant, Earth Consultants International, Santa Ana, CA), General Overview of the Panama Canal Expansion.

  • Eldon Gath (Senior Consultant, Earth Consultants International, Santa Ana, CA), Tectonic Geomorphic and Paleoseismic Investigations of the Pedro Miguel Fault for the Panama Canal Expansion Project.

  • Tania Gonzalez (Project Geologist, Vice-president and Senior Partner, Earth Consultants International, Santa Ana, CA), History of Earthquake Activity of Panama.

  • Lelio Mejia (Project Manager, URS Corporation, San Diego, CA) or David Schug (Principal Geologist, URS Corporation, San Diego, CA), Borinquen Dam construction for the Canal Expansion Project.

  • Thomas E. Reifer (Department of Sociology, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA), Sociological Aspects of the Panama Canal on Panama.

  • Maria Barbara Zepeda Cortez (Department of History, University of California San Diego, La Jolla CA), Imperialist perspective on the history of Panama and the Canal.




(12) 7th Annual Symposium on Materials Science and Nanotechnology. Organizers: Panos Photinos (Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; phaaas@sou.edu), Shalini Prasad (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ), and Philip Collins (University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA).
Sponsored by the Pacific Division section on Physics and Materials Science.
Currently scheduled for Monday, 13 June.

This symposium will include oral and poster presentations on materials research, and oral presentations on undergraduate curriculum development in materials science and nanotechnology. Persons interested in presenting in this program should contact the planners at the above e–mail address. Contributions from graduate and undergraduate students are especially encouraged. Student presenters are eligible for division and sectional awards and travel grants.







(13) Antarctic Ice Is Nice. Organizers: Ronald S. Kaoufman and Anne Sturz (Marine Science and Environmental Studies Department, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; kaufmann@sandiego.edu).
Sponsoring section: Atmospheric and Oceanographic Sciences.
Currently scheduled for Tuesday, 14 June.

This symposium includes an examination of Antarctic ice and associated ecosystems. The impact of global warming on polar regions has been the subject of considerable recent research. In particular, warming in West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula has been correlated with retreating glaciers, resulting in significant loss of ice mass over the past decade (Rignot et al., 2008). Antarctic glaciers have been accelerating (Pritchard and Vaughan, 2007), changing the dynamics of the continental ice sheet. In addition, ice shelves around the Antarctic continent have been breaking up, with increased occurrences of large icebergs originating from ice shelves in the Ross, Bellingshausen and Weddell Seas (e.g. Scambos et al, 2000; Bindschadler and Rignot, 2001; Ballantyne, 2002; Long et al., 2002). Changing ice cover and the increased production of icebergs can affect physical and biological processes on the Antarctic continent and in the Southern Ocean. Speakers contributing to this symposium will discuss distribution of Antarctic glaciers, subglacial lakes, sea ice, currents affecting ice transport, effects of icebergs on water column structure and biological communities in the Southern Ocean.

PROPOSED SPEAKERS:

  • Fernando Paolo (Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA), Elevation Changes on Antarctica’s Ice Shelves.

  • Sasha Carter (Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA), Subglacial Lakes.

  • John J. Helly (San Diego Supercomputer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA) Effects of Antarctic Icebergs on Water Column Structure.

  • Ronald S. Kaufmann (Marine Science and Environmental Studies Department, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA) Biological Communities Associated with Antarctic Icebergs.

  • Danielle N. Garcia (Marine Science and Environmental Studies Department, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA) Antarctic Krill Physiology and Biochemistry.




(14) Fragile-X Syndrome: Advances in Our Understanding of a Common Cause of Retardation and Autism. Organizers: Veronica V. Galván (Department of Psychological Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; vgalvan@sandiego.edu) and Peter W. Vanderklish (Department of Neurobiology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA; pvanderk@scripps.edu).
Sponsoring section: Atmospheric and Oceanographic Sciences.
Currently scheduled for Tuesday, 14 June.

Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation and the leading known cause of Autism. Many affected individuals also suffer from anxiety, attention deficit, hyperactivity, obsessive-compulsive disorders, developmental seizures and subtle physical symptoms. These wide ranging symptoms are caused by the silencing of a single gene, denoted Fmr1. In unaffected individuals, this gene is active and produces a protein (FMRP) that regulates the de novo synthesis of hundreds of other proteins at synapses. Intensive, multidisciplinary studies of FMRP and synaptic dysfunctions that arise from its absence in Fragile X syndrome have provided exciting insights into the neural basis of this syndrome that may also apply to other causes of Autism. These efforts have led to candidate therapies while also advancing our basic understanding of the mechanisms that control neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity. This symposium will provide a forum for scientists, teachers, students, and interested lay public to hear both an introduction to Fragile X from parents of affected children and a series of talks from scientists that will present some of the latest research in the field. Scientific topics will include the molecular basis of synaptic dysfunction in Fragile X syndrome, alterations in synaptic plasticity and aggregate neural activity, and potential therapeutic strategies. Further information and resources will be made available by the FRAXA Research Foundation, an organization founded by parents that funds Fragile X research and has been instrumental in advancing the field by supporting scientists to find a cure.

SPEAKERS:

  • Molly M. Huntsman (Children's Research Institute and Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.)

  • Julie C. Lauterborn (University of California, Irvine, CA)

  • Andrea Shelly (Fragile-X Parent and FRAXA member)

  • Peter W. Vanderklish (The Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, CA)




(15) The Second Law of Thermodynamics: Status and Challenges. Organizer: Daniel P. Sheehan (Department of Physics, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; dsheehan@sandiego.edu).
Sponsored by the Pacific Division section on Physics and Materials Science.
Currently scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday, 14 and 15 June.

The second law of thermodynamics is considered one of the central principles of science, engineering and technology. Since its discovery 185 years ago, no counter-example has been recognized by the scientific community, and its status is generally considered absolute. During the last two decades, however, it has come under unprecedented scrutiny by research groups worldwide, as evidenced by the more than two dozen distinct challenges advanced against it in over 60 articles. Several of these challenges have moved into laboratory testing.

In this symposium, the current experimental and theoretical status of second law will be examined. Topics will include nonequilibrium systems, Maxwell’s demon, decoherence, the thermodynamic arrow of time. Emphasis will be given to current and proposed experiments addressing questions of second law universality. It is hoped this meeting will generate new theoretical models by which emerging experimental results can be understood, and stimulate new experiments and collaborations by which the underlying physics of the second law may be more fully exposed.

PROPOSED SPEAKERS:





(16) Quantum Retrocausation: Theory and Experiment. Organizer: Daniel P. Sheehan (Department of Physics, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; dsheehan@sandiego.edu).
Sponsored by the Pacific Division section on Physics and Materials Science.
Currently scheduled for Monday and Tuesday, 13 and 14 June.

Causation – the notion that earlier events affect later ones but not vice versa – undergirds our experience of reality and physical law. Although it predicated on the forward unidirectionality of time, in fact, most physical laws are time symmetric; that is, they formally and equally admit both time-forward and time-reverse solutions. Time-reverse solutions would allow the future to influence the past, i.e., reverse (or retro-) causation. Why time-forward solutions are preferentially observed in nature remains an unresolved problem in physics.

Laboratory evidence for reverse causation is intriguing but scarce; meanwhile, theoretical models for these results have not yet made deep enough connections with mainstream physics. Even the most basic physical constraints – e.g., whether reverse causation is best explained by energy transfers or simply by correlations without information exchange – remain open questions.

This symposium will explore recent experiments, theory, and philosophical issues connected with retrocausation. In particular, it is hoped that this meeting will help generate comprehensive theoretical models by which experimental results can be understood, and stimulate new experiments and collaborations by which the underlying physics may be more clearly exposed.

PROPOSED SPEAKERS:





(17) Music and the Sciences: Synergies Among Musical Arts, Math, Science, and Engineering. Organizers: Thomas F. Schubert, Jr. (Department of Engineering, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; schubert@sandiego.edu) and Ani Velo (Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; avelo@sandiego.edu).
Sponsored by the Pacific Divison section on General and Interdisciplinary Studies.
Currently scheduled for Tuesday, 14 June.

The linkage between science and music is not a new concept; throughout much of western history, science and art were each considered as philosophy. Aristotle’s exploration of the physical world led him to study musical scales, modes, and harmonic relationships with the use of weights. Galileo’s father was a famous musician and Einstein played violin.

The purpose of this symposium is to bring people artificially separated by modern academic disciplines together to re-explore the common ground shared by math, science, engineering, and music.

math, science, and engineering are solicited. It is expected that a wide variety of topics will be covered including: music composition, neurological perception of music, and acoustics.

PROPOSED SPEAKERS:

  • Steven Schick (Distinguished Professor of Music, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA)

  • Lilly Hood Gunn (Composer)

  • Ronald Fox (Oboe acoustician)





(18) United States and World's Fairs. Organizer: Alan L. Bain (Emeritus Certified Archivist; Volunteer, National Anthropological Archives; Retired Archivist, Smithsonian Institution Archives, National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD; abina@si.edu).
Sponsored by the Pacific Division section on Anthropology and Archaeology.
Currently scheduled for Wednesday, 15 June.

World’s fairs are good fun and food. But, that is not all. Fairs are complex events that contain multiple ideas and meanings to the directors and managers, business community, the audience, participants, exhibitors and government administrators. They reflect themes of technological and industrial advance, empire and colony, racism and research, self-image, respect and independence. This symposium covers a wide range of topics and fairs documenting Asia and Asian American communities represented at the fairs, the reasons for the collections of ethnological material and other artifacts and what happened to them, Californians response to the Panama-Pacific Exposition, mummies on display, how Native Americans were represented, and how the Japanese depicted the Ainu. Anthropologists, historians and archivists will participate at this symposium. In addition to the above, there will be a discussion on the use of archives to document fairs, the information they contain, and the continuous need to acquire additional records and special collections.

SPEAKERS:

  • Patricia O. Afable (Research Associate, Asian Cultural History Program, Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.), Documenting the New Colony through its Objects: The Smithsonian’s Philippine Collections from the early 20th Century International Fairs.

  • Bennet Bronson (Chinese in Northwest America Research Committee, Bainbridge Island, WA), Asian Americans and Asian Nations at U. S. World Fairs, 1876-1915.

  • James G. Gilbert (Distinguished University Professor Emeritus, History Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD), Writing the History of World’s Fairs.

  • Chuimei Ho (Chinese in Northwest America Research Committee, Bainbridge Island, WA), Platform for Immigration Battles: Chinese Americans at World Fairs before 1920.

  • Lars Krutak (Repartiation Office, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.), Living ‘Cliff Dwellers’ at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition: An Enduring Metaphor of a 21st Century Indigenous People.

  • Tammy Lau (Head, Special Collections Research Center, California State University, Fresno, CA), World’s Fairs as Special Collections.

  • Abigail Markwyn (Assistant Professor of History, Carroll University, Waukesha, WI), Defining a Californian: Visions of California at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.

  • Stephen E. Nash (Curator, Department of Anthropology, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, CO), A Publicly Ethereal Manifestation: Chicago, Anthropology, and the World’s Columbian Expositions.

  • Samuel Redman (Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, and Academic Specialist, Regional Oral History Office, Bancroft Library, Univesity of California, Berkeley, CA), Mummies in Context: Displays of Human Remains at World’s Fairs in the United States.

  • Deana Weibel (Associate Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Grand Valley State University, Allendale MI) and Patricia O. Afable (Research Associate, Asian Cultural History Program, Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.), Performers, Interpreters, and the Showman Onstage and Offstage at the Pay Streak's ‘Igorrote Village’.

  • Yoshiko Yamamoto Curator, Treganza Anthropology Museum Archives, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA), The Legacy of an Ainu Activist, Kayano Shigeru: His Lifelong Efforts to Save Ainu Heritage.




(19) The Forensic Science of Clinical Mental Health in Death Penalty Cases: Theresa Lewis Case. Organizer: Ronn Johnson (University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; ronnjohn@cts.com).
Sponsored by the Pacific Division section on Psychology.
Currently scheduled for Monday, 13 June.

Death penalty cases often contain mental health mitigating factors. CACREP is a counseling organization that accredits clinical mental health training programs. Among the CACREP standards are assessment, diagnosis, ethics, psychopathology, and forensic issues. Theresa Lewis was a death penalty case where the aforementioned forensic mental health factors were relevant. Lewis was the 12th woman to be executed in the United States since capital punishment was reinstated in 1976. She was convicted and sentenced to death in a murder for hire incident, with the two male co-conspirators receiving life sentences. The Theresa Lewis case is significant for two clinical mental health reasons. First, it provides a forensic mental health framework for the science-based application of various clinical tools. Second, there is an opportunity for examining the extent to which these mental health tools meet Daubert standards.

This symposium includes a number of paper presentations that examine forensic mental health issues related to the Theresa Lewis case. Papers are presented in twos followed immediately by a “counter viewpoint” facilitated by discussants that will be recruited in advance of the conference or may contact the chair of the symposium for inclusion in the program. Presentation titles are expected to include:

  • Overview and wrap up questions for forensic mental health in death penalty cases

  • Opposing forensic mental health reports in death penalty cases

  • Dependent personality disorder as a mitigating factor in death penalty cases

  • IQ as a mitigator in death penalty cases

  • Forensic mental health cultural and ethical considerations in death penalty cases

  • Forensic mental health issues in domestic violence

  • “Clinical mental health issues” in death penalty cases

  • Behavioral disorders or mental impairment “not” contained in the DSM-IV-TR

  • Care of the mental health professional in death penalty cases

  • Identifying, securing, organizing and reviewing mental health data in death penalty cases
SPEAKERS:

  • Kristen Grieder (M.A. Candidate, Department of Psychology, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA)

  • Kristen Dascanio (M.A. Candidate, Department of Psychology, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA)

  • Erica Bessen (M.A. Candidate, Department of Psychology, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA)

  • Kelsey Campion (M.A. Candidate, Department of Psychology, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA)

  • Brianna Bowman (M.A. Candidate, Department of Psychology, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA)

  • Chris Wilhelm (M.A. Candidate, Department of Psychology, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA)

  • Sharlaine Brockoff (M.A. Candidate, Department of Psychology, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA)




(20) The Changing Role of the Research University in K–12 Science Education. Organizers: Sherry Seethaler (Staff Director of California Teach, Division of Physical Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA; sseethaler@ucsd.edu) and John Czworkowski (Lecturer, PSOE, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA; jczworkowski@ucsd.edu).
Sponsored by the Pacific Division on Education.
Currently scheduled for Wednesday, 15 June.

Concerns about America’s future science and technology competitiveness in the global economy are changing the role of the nation’s research universities in K-12 science education. The National Academies’ report, Rising Above the Gathering Storm, recommended three actions to improve K-12 STEM education: 1) Attract more of America’s brightest students to the teaching profession; 2) Strengthen the skills of the nation’s current K-12 teachers; and 3) Enlarge the pipeline of students prepared to pursue STEM degrees. This symposium reveals how four research universities broke down intra-institutional barriers (between science and education departments) and inter-institutional barriers (between universities and K-12 schools) to address these aspects of precollege science education. University of Arizona’s Science Teacher Preparation Program, University of California, San Diego’s California Teach, and University of California Berkeley’s Cal Teach and Summer Research Institute exemplify ways to bridge the traditional gap between undergraduate science curricula and education credential programs to develop future teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge. Project PASS at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas uses a professional learning community to strengthen the skills of current teachers through a collaborative partnership between a university and a large urban school district. Another strategy is the creation of University-led charter schools, such as the University of California, San Diego’s Preuss School, that provide rigorous college preparatory courses for diverse, low-income, first-generation college students. The panel will explore these programs, institutional changes that made them possible, how early dissonance was overcome, implementation, impact, and unexpected effects that continue to engage research universities in science education.

SPEAKERS:

  • Sherry Seethaler (Staff Director of California Teach, Division of Physical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, CA)

  • Kent J. Crippen (Associate Professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV) Leveraging a Collaborative Partnership to Achieve High Quality Professinal Development for Science Teachers.

  • John Czworkowski (Lecturer, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, CA) Content-intensive courses in UC San Diego's Science Educatin Minor: Preliminary Results on their Effects on Pre-service Science Teachers.

  • Nicci Nunes (Staff Director of California Teach, College of Letters and Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA) UC Berkeley's Response to the Gathering Storm: Cal Teach and MfA Berkeley.

  • Barbara Sawrey Associate Vice Chancellor for Undergraduate Education and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA) More than Outreach: Starting a Charter School on a Research University Campus.

  • Debra Tomanek (Assistant Vice Provost for Instruction and Assessment and Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ ) Growing a Culture for Science Education in the University of Arizona's College of Science.




(21) Pathways to Science: Promoting Inquiry-Based Learning Beyond the Classroom. Organizers: Carl A. Maida (University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; cmaida@ucla.edu) and Paul Heckman (University of California Davis, Davis, CA).
Sponsored by the Pacific Division section on Education.
Currently scheduled for Wednesday, 15 June.

This session will combine didactic, experiential, and reflective activities – essential elements in Inquiry-Based Learning – to engage audience members, including K-14 teachers and informal science educators, and presenters in a professional learning community experience. The intent is to provide an opportunity for collaborative inquiry and the learning related to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) in out-of-school-time settings. While increasing numbers of students start college with plans to major in the STEM fields, their completion rates are lagging, especially among underrepresented minorities. Generating and sustaining interest in a scientific career will require engaging students in STEM learning activities outside of the classroom, such as collaborating with their peers on group projects in after school programs and science clubs. This workshop will consider ways to increase students’ scientific literacy through involvement in project-based learning – that is also inquiry-based – in after school programs and in experiential, community-based learning activities, including mentored internships, with the objectives of: 1) increasing knowledge of science; 2) improving the sense of self-efficacy; and 3) promoting basic, applied, and clinical sciences as career choices. Panelists will discuss current issues and future trends in out-of-classroom science education, including STEM after school programs, pre-college science enrichment and “pipeline” programs, university-community partnerships, STEM scientist educational outreach and mentoring activities, Informal STEM education, “National Lab Day,” “living classrooms,” scientific literacy, and “citizen science” initiatives. The session will also consider the ways high school seniors and college students, together, can serve as science ambassadors and role models to engage their peers in out-of-classroom activities that enhance an understanding, appreciation, and perhaps a passion for science and scientific inquiry.

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Shirley Malcom, Director of Education and Human Resources Programs at AAAS, will give the Keynote Presentation of the session, “The Promise of Inquiry-Based Learning Beyond the Classroom.”

Following the symposium and lunch (on your own) there will be an informal field trip to the San Diego campus of High Tech High. High Tech High began in 2000 as a single charter high school launched by a coalition of San Diego business leaders and educators. It has evolved into an integrated network of schools spanning grades K-12, housing a comprehensive teacher certification program and a new, innovative Graduate School of Education. The Gary and Jerri-Ann Jacobs High Tech High is the original High Tech High school. Founded in the fall of 2000, the school is located at HTH Village in San Diego and serves approximately 535 students in grades 9-12. High Tech High now operates eleven schools in San Diego County: two elementary schools, four middle schools, and five high schools. All of these schools serve a diverse, lottery-selected student population; all embody the High Tech High design principles of personalization, adult world connection, common intellectual mission, and teacher as designer. Participants in this symposium are invited to join in this unique opportunity to see how this innovative school functions. Additional details will be announced in the session.

CONFIRMED PARTICIPANTS:

  • Shirley Malcom (Director of Education and Human Resources Programs, AAAS, Washington, D.C.)

  • Paul Heckman (Professor and Associate Dean, School of Education, University of California Davis, Davis, CA)

  • William B.N. Berry (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA)

  • Paul Bunje (University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA)

  • Marvin Marcus (Distinguished Professor and Director, UCLA-Howard Hughes Medical Institute Pre-College Science Education Initiative, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA)

  • Jeff Davis (University of California Davis, Davis, CA)

  • Kimberly Tanner (Professor and Director, Science Education Partnership and Assessment Laboratory, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA)

  • Carl A. Maida (Professor and Co-Director, UCLA-Howard Hughes Medical Institute Pre-College Science Education Initiative, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA)

  • Sam Beck (Director, Urban Semester in New York City, College of Human Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY)

  • Andee Press-Dawson (University of California Davis, Davis, CA)

  • Richard Roberts (Retired, Beyond the Bell Branch, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, CA)

  • Johnnie Savoy (CEO, College Bound, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA)

  • Jay Vavra (Biology Teacher and Director, Biotechnology Program, High Tech High, San Diego, CA)

  • Stu Semigran (EduCare Foundation)




(22) Don't Sign Your Life Away: Author's Rights, Scientific Publishing, Digital Repositories, and the Case for Open Access. Organizers: Steven Staninger (Business Librarian, Copley Library, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; sstan@sandiego.edu) and Amy Besnoy (Science Librarian, Copley Library, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; abesnoy@sandiego.edu).
Sponsored by the Pacific Division section on Atmospheric and Oceanographic Sciences.
Currently scheduled for Monday, 13 June.

This symposium and accompanying workshop will focus on author’s rights, the legal background on copyright, the broad field of scientific publishing, and the benefits of open access to alleviate costs. Digital repositories will be discussed as a way for the academy to reclaim the ownership and dissemination of intellectual property.

PROPOSED SPEAKERS:

  • Crystal Goldman (Liaison Librarian, Open Access Team, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. LIbrary, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA)

  • Kelly Douglas (General Counsel, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA)

  • Steve Staninger (Business Librarian, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA)


(23) New Humanities and Science Convergences: Poetry and Science. Organizers: Robert Louis Chianese (California State University, Northridge robert.chianese@csun.edu) and Carl A. Maida (University of California, Los Angeles; cmaida@ucla.edu).
Sponsored by the Pacific Division section on General and Interdisciplinary Studies.
Currently scheduled for Monday, 13 June.

The symposium presents comparative discussions of poetry and science as forms of knowing, as well as their methodologies; their forms of expression and proof; their uses of language; their relative acceptance by cultures at various times; the political, social, and intellectual controversies they have fomented; and the changing, comparative public images of the poet and scientist. It also considers whether nature poetry describes the world in terms with which scientists would agree.

A related topic for discussion is what the radical imbalance of governmental support for the Humanities vs. the Sciences (FY 2011 $167 million vs. $40 billion) bodes for education, society, and the futures of poetry and science themselves.

PROPOSED SPEAKERS:





(24) Literature and Science: Exploring the Confluence. Organizer: Halina Duraj (Department of English, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA; hduraj@sandiego.edu).
Sponsored by the Pacific Division section on General and Interdisciplinary Studies.
Monday, 13 June.

As the creative endeavors of science, technology, and literature overlap in our increasingly interdisciplinary world, how do they affect each other? Hypertext and other interactive fictions suggest a genre of literary-scientific hybrids; beyond hypertext, what is the next frontier of innovative, experimental, science-and-technology inspired narratives or speculative fiction? For instance, how are developments in neuroscience changing the way we conceptualize narrative—digital and otherwise? And can developments in literature (and speculative fiction) influence science, or how it is communicated among scientists and lay people?

PROPOSED SPEAKERS:





(25) Science Education and Civic Engagement. Organizers: Amy Shachter (Associate Provost, Research and Academic Affairs, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA; ashachter@scu.edu) and Steve Bachofer (Department of Chemistry, Saint Mary’s College, Moraga, CA; bachofer@stmarys-ca.edu).
Sponsored by the Pacific Division section on Education.
Currently scheduled for Tuesday, 14 June.

The Science Education and Civic Engagements symposium will provide examples of courses that link science education and civic engagement. This symposium will include examples of courses designed to improve science education by helping to develop and strengthen efforts that teach through complex social issues to the basic science necessary to comprehend and intelligently act on them.  We invite presentations on courses that promote critical thinking and research skills for problem-solving through service-learning and community-based research on important public policy issues.  Finally, courses that foster student engagement in the community to create a greater sense of place and responsibility will be highlighted.

PROPOSED PARTICIPANTS:

  • Steve Bachofer (Department of Chemistry, Saint Mary’s College, Moraga, CA)

  • Amy Shachter (Associate Provost, Research and Academic Affairs, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA)

  • Christopher Kim (Chapman University, Orange, CA)

  • Virginia Carson (Chapman University, Orange, CA)

  • Susan Larson (Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA)

  • Jacquelin Dewar (Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA)

  • Carolyn Viviano (Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA)

  • Larry Duffy (University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK)

  • Bob Franco (Kapi`olani Community College, Honolulu, HI)




(26) aDNA and Associated Biomolecules. Organizers: Mark Spigelman (Sydney, Australia) and Dong Hoon Shin (Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; drdoogi@snu.ac.kr).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Tuesday, 14 June.

DNA and associated biomolecules form an important and growing part of research associated with mummy studies. A discussion of the progress and future direction of this science will help mummy researchers to better understand how this type of investigation could assist workers in the field and also contribute to a better understanding of the life and death of mummies. As this research is potentially destructive, the symosium will discuss how to biopsy mummies using minimally destructive or intrusive methodology. A second goal of the symposium is to try to establish baselines and protocols on how and/or what to sample and amounts to be taken in order to achieve the desired results. Persons interested in participating in this session are urged to contact the organizers.

SPEAKERS:
  • Dong Hoon Shin, DNA and Worms from Korean Mummies.

  • Mark Spigelman, et. al., The Full Genome of the Hepatitis B Virus from a Korean Mummy.

  • Albert Zink, The Technical Problems of DNA Extraction from Mummies.

  • Mark Spigelman, Progress on Two Mummy Collections from Hungary and Spain.

  • Discussion, A panel of experts and congress participants will answer questions on how DNA or biomolecules can increase knowledge of ancient mummies.




(27a) Princess Takabuti – Analysis, Interpretation, and Visualization. Organizer: Caroline Wilkinson (Senior Lecturer, Facial Anthropologist, Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland; C.M.Wilkinson@dundee.ac.uk).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Wednesday, 15 June.

This symposium relates the study of “Princess” Takabuti, an Egyptian mummy from the Ulster Museum in Belfast, Ireland. This was the first mummy to be displayed in Ireland (1835) and has been the highlight of the Ulster’s Egyptian collection. In 2008, the mummy was taken to the University of Manchester where Rosalie David and a team of scientists analyzed the mummy for evidence of disease, diet, lifestyle, lifespan, status, and religious practices. Caroline Wilkinson from the University of Dundee created a 3-D reconstruction of the mummy’s face. See #27b for a continuation of this topic.

SPEAKERS:

  • Rosalie David, Introduction to the Takabuti Project.

  • Winifred Glover, The Archaeology and History of Takabuti.

  • Judith Adams and Eileen Murphy, Imagine Takabuti: Radiology and Osteology.

  • John Denton and Ken Wildsmith, Takabuti's Health: Endoscopy and Histology.

  • Sarah Shrimpton and Caroline Wilkinson, The Face of Takabuti: Scientific Facial Reconstruction.




(27b) Facial Analysis and Depiction of Preserved Remains. Organizer: Caroline Wilkinson (Senior Lecturer, Facial Anthropologist, Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland; C.M.Wilkinson@dundee.ac.uk).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Wednesday, 15 June.

The second part of this double symposium (see #27a for first part) explores techniques by various researchers on the visualization of a wide range of subjects from the possible skull of Cleopatra’s sister, a shrunken head from South American, and a bog body from Ireland, to a mummified anatomical child specimen

SPEAKERS:
  • Chris Rynn, The Craniofacial Analysis of the Possible Skull of Arsinoe, Sister of Cleoparta.

  • Tobias Houlton, Facial Analysis of a Tzantsa: A Shrunken Head from the Shuar Tribes of South America.

  • Janice Aitken, The Facial Depiction of Clonycavan Man – A Bog Body from Ireland.

  • Caroline Wilkinson, Body Snatchers – The Analysis of a Mummified Human Child as an Anatomical Specimen.

  • Joshua Harker, Historical/Archaeological Digital Forensic Facial Reconstruction from CT Scans.




(28) The Rio Muerto Project: Mummies of the Tiwanaku Culture from Moquegua, Peru. Organizer: Paul S. Goldstein (Department of Anthropology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA; psgoldstein@dssmail.ucsd.edu).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Wednesday, 15 June.

This symposium outlines the bioaracheological study of one of the best-preserved Tiwanaku sites (AD 500-1000) in Peru. The high degree of preservation of the human and cultural remains has allowed the study of paleodiet, gender, and status-based differences, through body preparation, cranial deformation, textile evidence, carbon and nitrogen isotope data, and mortuary architecture

SPEAKERS:

  • Paul S. Goldstein, Ulrike M. Green, Alicia Boswell, Sarah I. Baitzel, and Patricia Palacios, The Rio Muerto Project 2006 – 2010: Mummy Reparation, Mortuary Practice, and Social Identity in the Tiwanaku State (AD 500 – 1000).

  • Elizabeth M. Plunger and Paul S. Goldstein, Dress, Death, and Identity in Moquegua Tiwanaku: Textile Evidence from the Rio Muerto Mummies, Moquegua, Peru.

  • Andrew D. Somerville, Paul S. Goldstein, Sarah I. Baitzel, Margaret J. Schoeninger, Sarah Raubenheimer, and Linda Yzurdiga, Unwrapping Tiwanaku Diet: Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Data from the Mummies of Rio Muerto, Moquegua, Peru.

  • Sara K. Becker, Labor, Gender, and Identity: Bioarchaeological Activity Patterns in Mummified and Skeletonized Individuals fromm the Tiwanaku State (AD 500 – 1000).





(29) Studies on an Old Kingdom Mummy. Organizer: Bob Brier (C.W. Post Campus, Long Island University, Greenvale, NY; Mummy123@aol.com).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Thursday, 16 June.

The Carlos Museum at Emory University in Atlanta. Georgia has recently displayed a rare Old Kingdom mummy, giving researchers the opportunity to explore aspects of its preservation. The history of the mummy, its analysis and conservation are presented.

SPEAKERS:

  • Bob Brier, Introduction.

  • Peter Lacovara and Bob Brier, A History of the Oldest Egyptian Mummy in the Americas.

  • Monique Osigbeme, Interpreting the Life of the Carlos Museum's Old Kingdom Mummy.

  • Mimi Leveque and Renée Stein, Project Update on the Conservation Treatment of the Carlos Museum's Old Kingdom Mummy.




(30) Heart Disease and Atherosclerosis in Ancient Egyptian Mummies. Organizer: Randall Thompson (The Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO; rthompson@cc-pc.com).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Thursday, 16 June.

This symposium presents a comparison of cardiovascular disease from 52 Egyptian Mummies with studies of atherosclerosis in the preindustrial world. The work of the HORUS Study group and its “Hunt for Atherosclerosis” is outlined.

SPEAKERS:

  • Randall C. Thompson, Introduction – The Study Group on Heart Disease and Atherosclerosis in Ancient Egyptian Mummies.

  • L. Samuel Wann, The HORUS Study – The Hunt for Atherosclerosis.

  • Caleb E. Finch, Comparative Studies of Atherosclerosis in Communities in the Preindustrial World.

  • Randall C. Thompson, Demonstration of Cardioivascular Disease on CT Scans in Egyptian Mummies – Examples from 52 Cases.





(31) Mummies as Cultural Heritage. Organizers: Dario Piombino-Mascali and Albert Zink (Institute for the Mummies and the Iceman, EURAC Research, Bolzano, Italy; dario.piombino@eurac.edu).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Thursday, 16 June.

A wide range of mummy preservation and national recognition is explored from museum specimens to bog bodies. One of these is the Zweeloo Woman, a bog body from The Netherlands with evidence of Leri-Weill dyscondrosteosis (DSC) a dominantly inherited dysplasia marked by short stature with mesomelic shortening of middle segments of the forearms and lower legs. This is the first case of DSC syndrome recognized in a 2nd century bog body from The Netherlands.

SPEAKERS:

  • Dario Piombino-Mascali, Introduction.

  • Darioi Piombino-Mascali, Albert Zink, Alberto and Stephanie Panzer, Like Stone, Anatomical Mummies and Specimens from the Rini Collection.

  • Marco Samadelli, Dario Piombino-Mascali, F.U. Rollo, Vito C. Fernicola, and Albert R. Zink, Development of a New Glass Case System for Mummy Conservation.

  • Albert Zinc, The Royal Mummies: A History Re-written by Science.

  • Lars Krutak, Marking with Needles and Lancets: The Antiquity of Therapeutic Tattooing.

  • Raffaella Bianucci, Don Brothwell, Wijnand van der Sanden, Christina Papageorgopoulou, Paul Gostner, Patrizia Pernter, Eduard Egarter-Vigl, Frank Maixner, Marek Janko, Dario Piombino-Mascali, Grazia Mattutino, Frank Rühli, and Albert Zink, The Zweelo Woman: Multidisciplinary Investigation of a Bod Body.





(32) A Multidisciplinary Collaboration for Tissue Analysis: The Case of Kwäday Dän Ts'ínchi. Organizer: Maria Victoria Monsalve (Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, BC, Canada; vmonsalve@pathology.ubc.ca).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Thursday, 16 June.

This symposium intends to cover recent research on the Kwäday Dän Ts’ìnchi human remains found in northern British Columbia in 1999 and dated 1670 AD to 1850 AD. These remains were claimed by the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations people as the remains were found in their traditional territory. They agreed to retention of tissue samples for our studies after the body was cremated to get information on preservation of the tissues and on health status at the time of death.

The University of British Columbia (UBC), Canadian Light Source Inc. and the University of Saskatchewan researchers have been evaluating the state of preservation of the body tissues and assessing the impact from the surrounding environment. At UBC, using electron microscopy, we are gaining insight into environmental factors that could have been contributors of Kwäday Dän Ts’ìnchi’s health status at time of death. At the Swiss Light Source and the University of Saskatchewan, we are clarifying the meaning of the biochemical spectra obtained with infrared images at the Canadian Light Source Inc.

The University of Saskatchewan researchers have been analyzing microorganism DNA present in Kwäday Dän Ts’ìnchi’s internal organs. Their findings of specific microorganisms in some of the tissues support evidence of similar findings with electron microscopy at UBC. This symposium will be a unique opportunity to describe our multidisciplinary approach to these studies.

SPEAKERS:

  • Maria Victoria Monsalve, Introduction.

  • David Walker, The Value of Morphological Observations of Soft Tissues of Frozen Ancient Corpses.

  • Luca Quaroni, FTIR Spectromicroscopy Investigations of Preserved Tissue from Kwäday Dän Ts’ínchi.

  • Treena Swantson, The identification of a Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Ancient Kwäday Dän Ts’ìnchi Individual.





(33) Hair in Archaeology. Organizers: Jocelyn S. Williams (Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Trent University, Peterborough, ON, Canada; jocelynwilliams@trentu.ca) and Andrew S. Wilson (Lecturer in Forensic and Archaeological Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK; a.s.wilson2@bradford.ac.uk).
Sponsoring organization: 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies.
Currently scheduled for Thursday, 16 June.

The objective of this symposium is to showcase the diversity of research using hair from archaeological contexts and explore how this research has enhanced the understanding of past populations. The chemical analysis of hair can provide information about diet, mobility, disease, stress, drug use, genetic data, season of death, and a variety of biochemical processes.

SPEAKERS:

  • Jocelyn S. Williams and Andrew S. Wilson








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