AAAS Pacific Division

91st Annual Meeting
SOUTHERN OREGON UNIVERSITY
Ashland, OR

13 – 17 June 2010


SYMPOSIA


The following symposia are in various stages of planning for the annual meeting. The listings below are tentative and subject to change. New symposia will be added as information is received from the organizers. Check this web site for updated information or e–mail inquiries to aaaspd@sou.edu. If you plan to attend the meeting largely for one symposium, please call 541–552–6869 to confirm its status before committing travel funds.



Index To Symposium Descriptions


(1) Forensic Science: A Balance of Art and Science.

(2) Wildlife Forensics.

(3) Improvement of Introductory Biology Course Teaching.....symposium cancelled

(4) Progress in Vaccines and Therapeutics.

(5) Anthropological Approaches to Environmental Change.

(6) 6th Annual Symposium on Materials Science and Nanotechnology.

(7) New Humanities and Science Convergences: Science–Humanities Cross Fertilizations.

(8) Ecotoxicology and Environmental Protection

(9) Science and Art Consilience

(10) Citizen Science: Integrating Biophysical and Social Realities in the Management of the Ashland Watershed

(11) Defended by Poets: The Role of Art in Communicating Climate Change in Our National Parks



Symposium Descriptions

(1) Forensic Science: A Balance of Art and Science. Organized by Mary Carrabba (Department of Chemistry, Southern Oregon University; e–mail: carrabbam@sou.edu).
Scheduled for Wednesday morning, 16 June.

Forensic science is the application of science to address legal inquiries related to civil or criminal activity in an effort to establish the authenticity of an artifact or event. In its application, forensic science typically utilizes many focused scientific disciplines, such as chemistry and biology. However, nonscientific disciplines, including art, are important elements of forensic analysis. This first session of two symposia focusing on Forensic Sciences (see #2 below) will seek to explore the many ways art is encountered in the field of forensic science, from detailed images viewed through a light microscope to the telltale details in a piece of artwork suspected of being a forgery. The symposium will also include discussions of how art is used in facial reconstruction, age progression, the forensic analysis of artifacts, and the intersection of chemistry and art conservation.

SPEAKERS:

  • Natasja A. Swartz and Tami Lasseter Clare(Department of Chemistry, Portland State University, Portland, OR) "Use of X-ray Microanalysis and Infrared Microspectroscopy for Multianalytical Characterization of the Walters Codex, an Ethiopian Manuscript."

  • Andrew Whitley (Vice–President Sales, HORIBA Scientific) "The Art of Raman and Raman of Art: A Powerful Technique to Direct Art Restoration and the Identification of the Real and Fake."

  • Margaret E. "Cookie" Sims and Bonnie Yates (U.S. National Fish and Wildlife Forensic Laboratory, Ashland, OR) "Ivory Identification at the National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory."

  • Tami Lasseter Clare (Department of Chemistry, Portland State University, Portland, OR) "Uncovering Mysteries of a Chinese Burial Relic."

  • Pepper Trail (National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory, Ashland, OR) "Amazonian Feather Art in the Forensic Context.)



(2) Wildlife Forensics. Organized by Peter Schroeder (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University; e–mail: pschroeder@sou.edu).
Scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, 16 June.

Ashland, Oregon, the host city of the 91st Annual AAASPD Meeting, is home to the only federal wildlife forensic laboratory in the world. This second session of a two–part symposium (see #1 above) will center on either wildlife forensic science as conducted in the U.S. National Fish and Wildlife Forensic Laboratory or selected presentations on different disciplines encountered in a more typical crime laboratory.

SPEAKERS:

  • Pepper W. Trail (USFWS National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory, Ashland, OR) "Numbering the Dead: Techniques for Determining the Minimum Number of Individuals Represented by Feathers and Other Bird Remains."

  • Edgard Esponoza, Mike Scanlan, Pamela McClure, and Barry Baker (USFWS National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory, Ashland, OR) "Forensic Identification of Black Coral."

  • Mary K. Burnhan–Curtis (USFWS National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory, Ashland, OR) "Forensic Identification of Bald and Golden Eagles using Nuclear DNA Markers."

  • Brian C. Hamlin, Steven R. Fain, Joe Zoline–Black, and Jake C. Miner (USFWS National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory, Ashland, OR) "Utility of Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Markers for Forensic Application in Gemsbok (Oryx gazella)."

    Robert M. Hoesch and Steven R. Fain (USFWS National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory, Ashland, OR) "Species Identification of Ivory Source."

  • Dyan J. Straughan and Steven R. Fain (USFWS National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory, Ashland, OR) "Mitochondrial and Y–Chromosome Data Reveal Evidence for Historical Introgression of Canis lycaon and C. Rufus DNA into C. latrans."




(4) Progress in Vaccines and Therapeutics. Organized by Kenneth Cornell (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University; e–mail: kencornell@boisestate.edu).
Scheduled for all day Monday, 14 June.

In this symposium, investigators and their students are invited to present research on the synthesis and testing of therapeutic drugs, development of drug delivery platforms, and identification of drug targets for a variety of human and animal diseases. As well, presentations are solicited on research into the identification and production of vaccine antigens, and development and testing of vaccines and vaccine delivery paradigms to stimulate protective immunity to treat infectious disease and cancer.

PROPOSED SPEAKERS:





(5) Anthropological Approaches to Environmental Change. Organized by Stephen Frost (Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon; e–mail: sfrost@uoregon.edu).
Scheduled for all day on Tuesday, 15 June.

This symosium examines the responses of organisms to changes in their environment. Speakers will include specialists from the fields of human biology, evolutionary psychology, primatology, and paleontology, all of which focus on different, but related aspects of how organisms interact with their environments. We are interested in the environment broadly conceived to include the physical, biological, and social context within which organisms must function. Different specialists will focus on different types and levels of response from behavioral and phenotypic plasticity within the lifespan of individual organisms, to cultural change, and to adaptation over evolutionary time scales. The participants include both established scholars within their respective disciplines as well as graduate and undergraduate students.

SPEAKERS:

  • E.H. Guthrie (University of Oregon), K. Harvati (Eberhard Karls Universität, Tübingen, Germany) and S.R. Frost (University of Oregon) "Ecological Correlates of Dental Eruption in Haplorrhines."

  • Frost, S.R., E.H. Guthrie (University of Oregon), and E. Delson (American Museum of Natural History, New York and Lehman College, CUNY, Bronx, NY) "Evolution of the Theropithecus oswaldi Lineage through 3 Myr of Global Climatic Change."

  • Minton, I.R. and F.J. White (University of Oregon) "Sexual Selection for Sex Differences in Bonobo Locomotor Strategies: Implications for Interpretations of Ardipithecus."

  • White, F.J., M.T. Waller, I.R. Minton and K.J. Boose (University of Oregon) "The Importance of Bonobos to Evolutionary Models of Human Social Behavior: Ecological Correlates of Female Bonding, No Infanticide, and or Lethal Raiding."

  • Snodgrass, J.J. (University of Oregon), W.R. Leonard (Northwestern University), L.A. Tarskaia (University of Nebraska and Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russia), T.J. Cepon, T.M. Klimova and V.G. Drivoshapkin (FSRI Institute of Health, Republic of Sakha/Yakutia, Yakutsk, Russia) "The Effects of Economic Development and Lifestyle Change on Cardiovascular Health Among an Indigenous Circumpolar Population."

  • Cepon, T., J.J. Snodgrass (University of Oregon), W.R. Leonard (Northwestern University), L.A. Tarskaia (University of Kansas and Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russia), T.M. Klimova and V.G. Krivoshapkin (FSRI Institute of Health, Republic of Sakha/Yakutia, Yakutsk, Russia) "Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders as a Consequence of Cold Adaptation Among the Yakut of Siberia."

  • Midttveit, E.C., H.H. McClure, J.J. Snodgrass, T.W. McDade, C.R. Martinez, J.M. Eddy, R.A. Jimenez, and L.E. Isiodria (University of Oregon, Oregon Social Learning Center (Eugene, OR), Northwestern University, and Farmworker Housing Development Corporation (Woodburn, OR)) "Body Composition and Lifestyle Correlates of Stress Biomarkers among Latino Immigrants in Oregon."

  • Liebert, M.A., J.J. Snodgrass, A.D. Blackwell, F.C. Madimenos(University of Oregon), and L.S. Sugiyama (University of Oregon and University of California Santa Barbara) "The Effects of Market Integration on Blood Pressure, Glucose, Cholesterol, and Triglyceride Levels in an Indigenous Lowland Ecuadorian Poplulation."

  • Madimenos, F.C., J.J. Snodgrass, M.A. Liebert, A.D. Blackwell (University of Oregon), and L.S. Sugiyama (University of Oregon and University of California, Santa Barbara) "Physical Activity Levels in an Ecuadorian Forager–Horticulturalist Population Undergoing Market Integration."

  • Ridgeway, J.R., F.C. Madimenos, M.A. Liebert, A.D. Blackwell (University of Oregon) and L.S. Sugiyama (University of Oregon and University of California, Santa Barbara) "Effects of Diet and Household Economy on Growth and Health of Indigenous Shuar of Ecuadorian Amazonia."



(6) 6th Annual Symposium on Materials Science and Nanotechnology. Organized by Panos Photinos and Ellen Siem(Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; e–mail: phaaas@sou.edu) and Shalini Prasad (Portland State University, Portland, OR).
Scheduled for Monday, 14 June.

This symposium will include oral and poster presentations on materials research, and oral presentations on undergraduate curriculum development in materials science and nanotechnology.

Persons interested in presenting in this program should contact the planners at the above e–mail address. Contributions from graduate and undergraduate students are especially encouraged. Student presenters are eligible for division and sectional awards and travel grants.

SPEAKERS:




(7) New Humanities and Science Convergences: Science–Humanities Cross Fertilizations. Organized by Robert Louis Chianese (California State University, Northridge; e–mail: robert.chianese@csun.edu) and Carl A. Maida (University of California, Los Angeles; e–mail: cmaida@ucla.edu).
Scheduled for Tuesday morning, 15 June.

This symposium is accepting papers that demonstrate how the sciences and humanities mutually benefit each other in specific ways, shaping each others’ fields, programs, outlooks, and products. We are also soliciting papers that deal with science–humanities cross–over figures who shape culture, consciousness, etc., such as Stephen Jay Gould, Leonardo DaVinci, and Galileo. It you are interested in submitting a paper to this symposium or would like more information, contact one or both of the organizers at their e–mail addresses listed above.

SPEAKERS:




(8) Ecotoxicology and Environmental Protection. Organized by Chris Oswald (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University; e–mail: oswald@sou.edu).
Scheduled for Tuesday, 15 June.

This symposium focuses on the ways in which ecotoxicology as a discipline can help promote both specific knowledge of particular environmental hazards, and general understanding of ecology and physiology. The field of ecotoxicology is an excellent tool for educating the public on the importance of environmental protection. The concept of direct effects of toxins on organisms provides a readily understood and appreciated starting point. The complex means by which toxins exert their deleterious effects are less familiar — ecosystem processes, trophic structure, community relationships, life history trait variation, biotransformation, etc. Lack of understanding of these important biological principles contributes in large part to the unwillingness of the public and policy makers to alter environmentally harmful practices. This symposium explores how communication of the findings of ecotoxicological research can be used to promote improved understanding of biological processes as well as specific risks associated with particular pollutants. Participants will present their research findings in this context, and discuss ways to get their message to the public. We will seek to identify biological concepts that are key to understanding the importance of environmental protection, and develop a framework for communicating these concepts within ecotoxicology.

PRESENTERS:

  • Scott Hecht (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administratiion, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Ecotoxicology and Environmental Fish Health Program, Seattle, WA), "Ecotoxicology and Endangered Species."

  • Jeffrey J. Jenkins (Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR), A Mechanistic Approach to the Evaluation of Pesticide Risks to Aquatic Species Native to the Pacific Northwest, ."

  • W.G. Landis, K.K. Ayre and A.J. Markiewicz (Institute of Environmental Toxicology, Huxley College of the Environment, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA) "Landscape Risk Assessment as a Science‐Policy Integrative Tool for Environmental Management."

  • Chris Oswald (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR) "Barriers to Sound Science–based Environmental Policy: Public Misonceptions Regarding Ecological and Physiological Processes."



(9) Science and Art Consilience. Organized by John D. Sollinger (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University; e–mail: sollingj@sou.edu).
Scheduled for Monday, 14 June.

Fifty years after C.P. Snow’s famous “two cultures” lecture, there is a movement to bridge the divide between art and science with an intellectual borderland where their shared creativity and quest for discovery can be synergized. The patterns, harmonies, symbols, and perceptions that are shared across borders and disciplines, where knowledge and wisdom unite, define a new way of thinking, teaching and learning. This paradigm shift serves to spark extraordinary creativity and inspiration for students, educators and researchers. Presenters from various disciplines will relate how they fuse science and art, leading to new insights and models in their research and teaching. John Sollinger will provide an overview of the symposium, introduce the concepts connecting art and science, and relate how he and Pete Schroeder (Southern Oregon University) connect visual art and biology. This will be followed by a panel of speakers, who will introduce the University of California, Davis Art–Science Fusion Program. Wendy Silk, Terry Nathan, Donna Billick and Diane Ullman (all from the University of California, Davis) will each present topics such as networking, the 2009 UC Davis Centennial Colloquium, “The Consilience of Art and Science,” and project based learning using music, ceramics, graphics, textiles and photography as bridge between art and science. Ann Savageau (University of California, Davis) will discuss the connections between art, design and building sustainability. Catherine Chalmers (Independent Artist, New York), an artist who uses visual arts to build environmental literacy will present her most recent video, We Rule, documenting the dominance and importance of ants on the planet. A philosophical perspective on consilience will be presented by Prakash Chenjeri (Southern Oregon University).

PRESENTERS:

  • Donna Billick (Co–Founder and Co–Director of the UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program, University of California, Davis)

  • Catherine Chalmers (Independent Artist, New York, NY)

  • Terry Nathan (Professor of Atmospheric Science, UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program, University of California, Davis)

  • Prakash Chenjeri (Associate Professor of Philosophy, Southern Oregon University)

  • Ann Savageau (Professor of Design, University of California, Davis)

  • Wendy K. Silk (Professor of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program, University of California, Davis)

  • John D. Sollinger (Professor of Biology, Southern Oregon University)

  • Diane Ullman (Professor of Entomology, Co–Founder and Co–Director of the UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Academic Programs, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California, Davis)


(10) Citizen Science: Integrating Biophysical and Social Realities in the Management of the Ashland Watershed. Organized by Mark A. Shibley (Professor of Sociology and Environmental Studies, Department of Environmental Studies, Southern Oregon University; e–mail: shibleym@sou.edu) and Marty Main (Owner, Small Woodland Services, Inc., Contract Consulting Forester for the City of Ashland, Adjunct Professor, Department of Environmental Scicnces, Southern Oregon University; e–mail: mmain3@mind.net).
Scheduled for all day Tuesday, 15 June.

The Ashland Watershed is a 15000 acre watershed that provides water for the City of Ashland. Located in steep, highly erosive topography, the watershed contains a large, relatively unmanaged forest ecosystem with a number of critical values, including late successional forests and high populations of older forest–dependent species such as fishers and northern spotted owls. It is also a highly diverse ecosystem, ranging from 2000–7000 feet elevation and 20–60 inches of annual precipitation in just 9 linear miles. Located in the dry eastern end of the Klamath–Siskiyou province, the area is at elevated risk of uncharacteristic high severity disturbance from insects, disease, and especially fire. A unique arrangement of citizen involvement and community collaboration resulted in the development of a “Community Alternative” that ultimately was largely accepted by the US Forest Service as the preferred alternative for their Ashland Forest Resiliency Project. The AFR project plans to implement ecologically sensitive forest and resource management activities to improve the long–term resiliency of the forest ecosystem, while minimizing the potential for high severity disturbance. AFR will be implemented, beginning in 2010, through a unique partnership between the US Forest Service, the City of Ashland, The Nature Conservancy, and Lomakatsi Restoration Project, a local forest restoration company. This symposium will explore the diverse biophysical and social realities that are producing a unique approach to land and resource management in the Ashland Watershed.

PRESENTERS:

  • Thomas Atzet (Atzet Ecological Consulting, Merlin, OR), "Functionality of the Siskiyou Mountain Ecosystem."

  • Tom Sensenig (US Forest Service, Area Ecologist SW Oregon)

  • David Clayton (US Forest Service, Rogue River–Siskiyou National Forest, Medford, OR) "Wildlife Response to Fuels Reduction Activities Research in the Ashland Watershed."

  • John J. Gutrich (Department of Environmental Studies, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR) "Economic Valuation of Forested Watersheds and Applicability to the Ashland Forest Resiliency Project."

  • Don Boucher (US Forest Service, Siskiyou Mountains Ranger District, Ashland, OR) "US Forest Service Role in Integrating Biophysical Realities: The Ashland Forest Resiliancy Stewardship Project."

  • Marty Main (Small Woodland Services, Inc, Consulting and Contracting Forester, Ashland, OR) "Forest and Resource Management in the Ashland Watershed: The Historical Context."

  • Darren Borgias (The Nature Conservancy, Medford, OR) "Multi–Party Monitoring to Build Community Support for AFR."

  • Mark A. Shibley (Department of Environmental Studies, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR) "What Did We Learn? An Assessment of AFR's Summer 2009 Multi–party Monitoring Process."

  • Chris Chambers (Ashland Fire and Rescue, Ashland, OR) "Community Engagement in the Ashland Resiliency Project."

  • Marko Bey (Lomakatsi Restoration Project, Ashland, OR) "AFR Stewardship Project: Developing Implementation Capacity through Workforce Training Programs."

  • Victoria Sturtevant (Department of Environmental Studies, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR) "A Broad Look at Multi–party Monitoring and Community Collaboration."

  • Joel King (US Forest Service, Wild Rivers Ranger District, Rogue River–Siskiyou National Forest) "Needing Conflict for Fire Resiliency."

  • George McKinley (Coordinator, Southern Oregon Small Diameter Collaborative, Ashland, OR) "Collaborative Design: Indicators and Landscape Assessments as a Means Toward Forest Restoration."

  • Kevin Preister (Center for Social Ecology and Public Policy) "Public Land Management for Community Health, How Far Do We Go?"

  • Richard A. Whitley (Living Systems Consulting, Ashland, OR) "Integrating Science, Policy, and Local Knowledge."


(11) Defended by Poets: The Role of Art in Communicating Climate Change in Our National Parks. Organized by Leigh Welling (National Park Service Climage Change Coordinator, National Park Service, 1201 Oakridge Dr, Fort Collins, CO 80525; e–mail: Leigh_Welling@nps.gov).
Scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, 16 June.

The National Parks have been described as America’s best idea. The pristine waterways, majestic mountains, and cultural treasures protected under the National Park Service (NPS) Organic Act are a legacy to leave our children and grandchildren. The beauty and splendor of the Nation’s natural and cultural landscapes have inspired music, poetry, paintings, and dance from artists such as U2, Ansel Adams, Emma Lazarus, and Amelia Rudolph. Art played a critical role in the establishment of the NPS. In 1872, the paintings of Thomas Moran were presented to Congress as testimony to the extraordinary wildlife and terrain of what would become Yellowstone National Park and inspired them to set aside a system of national parks in 1916.

Artistic expression remains an integral component for connecting the American public with their National Parks and in communicating the scientific complexity and rich cultural value of these special places. As scientists we understand that the parks, while protected, are not unimpaired. Global climate change in particular is challenging the ability of the NPS to carry out its mission of preserving nature unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations. While some impacts of climate change have already been documented, we are only beginning to grasp the possible long–range consequences. These will likely include the loss of native species, arrival of new species and diseases, loss of coastal resources to rising water levels, an increase in ocean temperatures and acidification, and changes in snowpack, streamflow, and fire severity and frequency. What will this mean for how America perceives and experiences its parks?

The speakers in this symposium will demonstrate examples of how visual, audio, and emotive expression is being used in National Parks of the Pacific region to capture and communicate what we stand to lose if climate change continues unabated. Images, stories, and poems will be shared by park employees and friends from parks such as Crater Lake National Park, Point Reyes National Seashore, Golden Gate Natural Recreation Area, Yosemite National Park, and Joshua Tree National Park. Examples will include the Artwork of Artist–In–Residence participants, a program that offers opportunities for two–dimensional visual artists, photographers, sculptors, performers, writers, composers, and craft artists to live and work in the parks. There are currently 29 parks participating in the program. Other examples will be communication and outreach products developed through Research Learning Centers (RLCs) in the NPS such the Pacific Coast Science and Learning Center, the California Mediterranean RLC, and the Crater Lake RLC. Discussions will explore how art and science can be used together to more effectively communicate the profound effects this issue is having on our Nation’s heritage. By bringing together Aristotle’s elements of logos (logic of the science), pathos (emotional connection to nature), and ethos (the integrity of the interpretive rangers), the NPS is in a unique position to foster changes in science literacy and social awareness through art and creative media tools.

PRESENTERS:





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