90th Annual Meeting
CALIFORNIAL ACADEMY of SCIENCES
SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY
San Francisco, CA

August 14 – 19, 2009


SYMPOSIA



NOTE: Due to other pressing obligations in preparing for the meeting, the information contained herein is relatively out of date. CLICK HERE in order to download the symposium schedule out of the meeting program, which is current as of 24 July 2009.


The following symposia are in various stages of planning for the annual meeting. The listings below are tentative and subject to change. New symposia will be added as information is received from the organizers. Check this web site for updated information or e-mail inquiries to aaaspd@sou.edu. If you plan to attend the meeting largely for one symposium, please call 541-552-6869 to confirm its status before committing travel funds.

Most symposia meet on the campus of San Francisco State University (SFSU). A few meet at the California Academy of Sciences (CAS).


Index To Symposium Descriptions



(1) Darwin and the Galapagos.

(2) The Evolution of Cooperation: Theoretical and Experimental Approaches.

(3) Amphibian Declines: The First Wave of a Mass Extinction? PROGRAM WITHDRAWN

(4) Comparative Genomics: From Prediction to Function. PROGRAM WITHDRAWN

(5) Weird Life.

(6) Sustainability as a Way of Life: Learning, Practice, and Experience.

(7) New Humanities and Science Convergences: Darwin and Culture.

(8) Project-based Learning and the Culture of Science Education in the 21st Century.

(9) Evolutionary Innovations: Where Ecology, Development and Macroevolution Intersect.

(10) Conservation in an Urban National Park.

(11) Near-Earth Objects: A Multi-dimensional Challenge.

(12) Materials Science and Nanotechnology.

(13) Advancing Materials Science and Nanotechnology Education.

(14) San Francisco Bay: Tracking and Understanding a Changing Estuary.

(15) Good Science is Only Part of the Job:  Communicating Science to the Public.

(16) Recent Advances in Pharmacology and Toxicology.

Symposium Descriptions


(1) Darwin and the Galapagos. Organized by Michael Ghiselin (California Academy of Sciences; e-mail: mghiselin@calacademy.org).
Scheduled for all day Friday and Saturday, 14 and 15 August at the California Academy of Sciences.

To commemorate the bicentennial of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of the publication of The Origin of Species the California Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with the Pacific Division of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), will sponsor a symposium on Darwin and the Galapagos from August 14 - 15, 2009. The Symposium will be dedicated to the memory of the late Robert I. Bowman, former Professor of Biology at San Francisco State University, who had a lifelong interest in Galapagos finches. There will be additional sessions for contributed papers.

The Symposium sessions will be held at the California Academy of Science's new building, which attains the highest standards in green architecture, at 55 Music Concourse Drive in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco. The Academy itself has a long history of involvement in scientific activities in the Galapagos Archipelego.

After the destruction of its building in the San Francisco earthquake and fire, the collections from the Galapagos expedition of 1905 – 1906 were crucial to the reestablishment of its facilities. The Academy has the best collection of Galapagos materials in the world. The Symposium is part of the Academy's effort to maintain and enhance its reputation as a center of intellectual activity.

On Monday following the symposium will be a single theme contributed paper session on Darwin. If you are interested in contributing to this session, please contact the organizers: Michele Aldrich (e-mail: maldrich@smith.edu) and Alan E. Leviton (California Academy of Sciences; e-mail: aleviton@calacademy.org).

SPEAKERS:

  • Jack Dumbacher (California Academy of Sciences) "From Darwin’s Galapagos to Mayr’s New Synthesis: The Whitney South Seas Expeditions of Rollo Beck"

  • Dennis Geist (University of Idaho, Moscow) "Darwin and Volcanoes "

  • Michael Ghiselin (California Academy of Sciences) "Going Public on the Galapagos: Reading Darwin between the Lines"

  • Sally Gibson (University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK) "Tracing Darwin’s Geological Footsteps on James Island (Isla Santiago)"

  • Peter and Rosemary Grant (Princeton University) "The Evolution of Darwin’s Finches"

  • Sandra Herbert (University of Maryland, Baltimore County) "Recreating Darwin’s Experiences as a Geologist using Texts, Sites, and Specimens"

  • Jonathan Hodge (University of Leeds, Leeds, UK) "Darwin, the Galapagos, and His Changing Thoughts about Species Origins: 1835–1837"

  • Matthew James (Sonoma State University, Sonoma, CA) "Collecting Evolution: The Untold Story of the Vindication of Charles Darwin by the 1905–1906 Galapagos Expedition of the California Academy of Sciences"

  • John McCosker (California Academy of Sciences) "The Fishes of the Galapagos: An Update and Review"

  • Edward Larson (University of Georgia) "A Damned Creation: The Galapagos Before Darwin"

  • Duncan Porter (Virginia Tech) "Darwin: The Botanist on the Beagle"

  • Frank Sulloway (University of California, Berkeley) "Darwin and The Galapagos: What Darwin Would Like to Have Known"

  • Robert Van Syoc (California Academy of Sciences) "Darwin, Barnacles, and the Galapagos: A View through a 21st Century Lens"



(2) The Evolution of Cooperation: Theoretical and Experimental Approaches. Organized by Andrew Zink (Department of Biology, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA; e-mail: zink@sfsu.edu).
Scheduled for all day Tuesday, 18 August at San Francisco State University.

Explaining cooperative associations remains one of the greatest challenges of evolutionary biology. This symposium highlights theoretical and empirical approaches to the evolution of cooperation at two distinct levels of organization: individuals in populations (altruism) and species in communities (mutualism). Recent reviews have highlighted the need for theoretical integration of these two separate areas of research; this symposium is a first important step toward that goal. In addition, the topics addressed within each research area (such as individuals within populations) are intentionally broad in order to facilitate discussions and exchange of ideas across different areas of biology. The range of study organisms (protists, insects, plants, birds, mammals, humans) reveals both the breadth of the field and the great potential for novel collaborations among researchers that work on the evolution of cooperation.

SESSIONS and SPEAKERS:

THEORETICAL APPROACHES
  • Andy Zink (San Francisco State University) ""

  • Barry Sinervo (University of California, Santa Cruz) ""

  • Ronald Lee (University of California, Berkeley) ""

  • Joan Roughgarden (Stanford University) ""
EMPIRICAL APPROACHES (Cooperation Within Species)
  • Rick Grosberg (University of California, Davis) ""

  • Sarah Cohen (San Francisco State University) ""

  • Neil Tsutsui (University of California, Berkeley) ""

  • Alan Krakauer (University of California, Davis) ""

  • Dai Shizuka (University of California, Santa Cruz) ""

  • Lauryn Benedict (University of California, Berkeley) ""

  • Ron Coleman (California State University, Sacramento) ""
EMPIRICAL APPROACHES (Cooperation Between Species)
  • Tony DeTomaso (Stanford University) ""

  • Monica Medina (University of California, Merced) ""

  • Joel Sachs (University of California, Riverside) ""

  • Donald Miller (California State University, Chico) ""

  • Ellen Simms (University of California, Berkeley) ""




(5) Weird Life. Organized by Jill C. Tarter (SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA; e-mail: tarter@seti.org), and John A. Baross (School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; e-mail: jbaross@u.washington.edu).
Scheduled for one half day on Tuesday, 18 August at San Francisco State University.

During 2009, Charles Darwin and his contribution to our understanding of the connectedness of all life on Earth (as we know it) will be celebrated numerous times. But what about life as we don’t yet know it? In 2007 the National Academy of Sciences released a report on of what it called 'Weird Life', life with an alternate biochemistry, life that may not share a common ancestor with all life that we are familiar with today. How would we recognize life based on different biosolvents, different nucleotides, different metabolic pathways? What instruments should we develop to aid human and robotic explorers undertaking a search for other forms of life? Are there extremophiles of the truly weird variety awaiting discovery on Earth, if only we knew how to identify them? These questions are all germane to the young discipline of Astrobiology as it seeks to understand the origins and extent of life here on Earth, and the potential for life beyond Earth.

PROPOSED SPEAKERS:

  • John Baross (School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA) "What Is Weird Life — Why Should We Care? "

  • Chris McKay (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA) "Shadow Life."

  • Rocco Mancinelli (SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA) "Extremophiles We Already Know and Love: What Do They Suggest?"

  • Ray Kurzweil (Kurzweil Technologies, Inc., North Andover, MA) "Evolution of Carbon-based Life Into Silicon or Something Else."

  • Chris Impey (Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ) "A Second Genesis — How Do We Deal with That?"

  • John Baross (School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA) "Distant Biosignatures."

  • Jill Tarter (SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA) "Searching for Weird Life of the Intelligent Kind."




(6) Sustainability as a Way of Life: Learning, Practice, and Experience. Organized by Robert Louis Chianese (California State University, Northridge, CA; e-mail: robert.chianese@csun.edu) and Carl A. Maida (University of California, Los Angeles, CA; e-mail: cmaida@ucla.edu).
Scheduled for all day on Tuesday, 18 August at the California Academy of Sciences.

The ongoing process of achieving sustainable systems is transforming many areas of modern life and culture: housing, building and community design, agriculture, energy use and transportation, waste management, forestry, business and economics, as well as personal life style, community values, and social relationships. This symposium examines sustainability as it impacts and transforms our daily lives. We will explore a wide range of topics and questions, including:

  • Does sustainability represent a new paradigm for personal, community, and global cooperation, or is its impact limited to a few areas of economics and the environment?
  • As we move further in the twenty-first century up the path toward more sustainable living, just how will our lives be changed?
  • How have the arts, architecture, and design been influenced by sustainability in both their content and methods of production?
  • What do plans for making sustainability a part of study across the curriculum mean for education and its goals?
  • What are the implications for shifting our attention from "maximums" to "optimums" as social ideals?
  • How might competitiveness as a goal be affected?
  • Are we being asked, perhaps impossibly, to shift or abandon some basic and valuable elements of our humanness in the pursuit of more efficient and sustainable ways of living?
  • How is personal consciousness shaped by having to take into account the global consequences of everyday living decisions?
  • Will intimate relationships and love itself be transformed by sustainable practices?
  • Does dedication to sustainable living involve a new ethic?
SPEAKERS:
  • Jurgen Schmandt (University of  Texas, Austin and Houston Advanced Research Center)"Sustainability Past and Present: Are We Making Progress?"

  • Lawence K. Duffy (University of Alaska, Fairbanks) "An Arctic Dimension to Sustainability: Resource Development, Legacies, and Education."

  • Alison M. Meadow (University of Alaska, Fairbanks) "Evaluating and Designing Urban Food Systems: The Role of Local Initiatives."
  • S. Craig Gerlach (University of Alaska, Fairbanks) "Coming to Terms with Northern Foods, Northern Futures."

  • Robert Louis Chianese (California State University, Northridge) "Does Economic Crisis Lead to a More Sustainable Way of Life?"

  • Krista Harper (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) "Ecologies of Hope: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Sustainability and Social Justice."

  • Marty Sayles (California State University, Northridge) "Going Green in Popular Culture."

  • Jay Vavra (High Tech High, San Diego, CA) "The San Diego Bay Study: Community-Based Conservation."

  • Wolff-Michael Roth (University of  Victoria, B.C., Canada) "Bootstrapping into Resilience: Science Education as/for Sustainability."





(7) New Humanities and Science Convergences: Darwin and Culture. Organized by Robert Louis Chianese (California State University, Northridge, CA; e-mail: robert.chianese@csun.edu) and Carl A. Maida (University of California, Los Angeles, CA; e-mail: cmaida@ucla.edu).
Scheduled for one half day on Monday, 17 August at San Francisco State University.

This symposium will explore the influence of Darwinian ideas that extend beyond biology into all branches of culture—from ecology, anthropology, economics, sociology and law, to such areas as art, literature, and design. Just how influential has evolution become in various academic disciplines, and how does it serve as a theoretical basis or even a metaphor for contemporary culture in its many forms today?

Does society evolve in Darwinian fashion, or is this just a metaphor to characterize change itself? Some speak of economies evolving in various stages as if it were a living species; does the analogy have some basis in biological fact? How can any one writer’s or artist’s or thinker’s work be said to evolve? Is contemporary architecture an evolutionary outgrowth of previous forms or a simple shift of design, materials and function? How much does the idea of sustainability, as it applies to cultural matters, resemble the sustainability of natural systems?

SPEAKERS:
  • Carl A. Maida (University of California, Los Angeles)"Community as Experience: Dewey, Darwin and Aesthetic Ecology."

  • Susan Massarik Aslan (Los Angeles Unified School District) "Educating for the Future: The Need for an Evolutionary Process in Teaching and Learning."

  • Robert Louis Chianese (California State University, Northridge) "Victorian Poets Adapt to Darwin."
  • Fred Massarik (University of  California, Los Angeles) "Not Everything Is ‘Darwin’: Evolution and Archival Change Theory in Light of Field-Theoretic Thought."




(8) Project-based Learning and the Culture of Science Education in the 21st Century.
Organized by Carl A. Maida (University of California, Los Angeles, CA; e-mail: cmaida@ucla.edu) and Paul Heckman (University of California, Davis, CA; e-mail: peheckman@ucdavis.edu).
Scheduled for one half day on Wednesday, 19 August at San Francisco State University.

Project-Based Learning (PBL) builds on John Dewey’s work on experiential, hands-on, student-directed learning, a century ago. According to the Buck Institute for Education, PBL is “a systematic teaching method that engages students in learning knowledge and skills through an extended inquiry process structured around complex, authentic questions and carefully designed products and tasks.” Although the various learning settings and PBL projects may resemble each other in terms of their organizational arrangements, the learning is ultimately delivered within a student-teacher relationship. The structure of this relationship and that of the school itself were shaped by an industrial culture that developed during a period of rapid industrialization in the late nineteenth century when the dual revolutions of technology and information processing were transforming the United States. For just as the technological and economic innovations of the Second Industrial Revolution rationalized production and distribution techniques in the material economy, the contemporary “control revolution” has provided new modes of information processing and communication technology to transform the cognitive or symbolic direction of twenty-first century enterprises. During the earlier transition from craft to mass production, schools provided a social context for the task of renegotiating and reframing both occupational techniques and world orientations in light of dramatic technological changes. So, too, have the challenges of the current technological revolution shifted the emphasis of education toward students actively using what they know to explore, negotiate, interpret and create. PBL challenges students by acknowledging their roles as participants engaged in producing knowledge. Through an amalgam of knowledge, skills, teamwork, and communication, PBL helps to develop habits of mind associated with personal and occupational success in the global economy. Like that of any complex service organization, school culture includes both the quality of interpersonal relations and the informal norms governing various activities, specifically help and trust. This session, in a round-table discussion format, will examine the quality and nature of the student-teacher relationship in PBL, specifically in science education. Learning encounters can be conceived as dialogues, and a distinctive feature of PBL is that it is constructed and negotiated through such encounters. Students perceive the value of PBL, experience this form of learning, and are rewarded through the responses of others (including parents, siblings and peers) to their projects through learning encounters. Of particular interest is the nature of the relationship for both the student and the teacher in this process, as well as collaboration beyond the student-teacher relationship, especially with the larger community.

For students:
  • What do you think PBL is about?
  • What makes PBL unique?
  • What do you value about PBL education?
  • Describe your relationships with PBL teachers.
  • Give an example of your PBL learning. Identify what you learned in this example and describe in detail how you learned it. How can you demonstrate that you learned it?
For teachers:
  • What did you learn through the PBL process?
  • What did you learn about yourself?
  • What did you learn about the PBL method?
  • What are the assets of the PBL pedagogy? For teachers? For students? For administrators?
  • Would you like to see PBL teaching implemented in more schools by more teachers? What wuld the advantages be in doing this? Disadvantages?
  • Do you think that all students would benefit from PBL or only some? What kind of student would benefit?
  • Would you like to see PBL taught as a subject to teachers in the future?
  • What have you learned about yourself and your students through applying PBL methods?
  • What hope do you hold for the future of the teaching profession, and of yourself as a teacher, as a result of your PBL experiences?
For both teachers and students:
  • What features of PBL do you particularly appreciate and how does it relate to schooling?

OPENING REMARKS:

  • Shirley Malcom (American Association for the Advancement of Science)
ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION:
  • Sam Beck (Cornell University)

  • William B. N. Berry (University of California, Berkeley)

  • Meg Burke (California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, CA)

  • Paul Heckman (University of California, Davis)

  • Richard Roberts (Los Angeles Unified School District)

  • Kimberly Tanner (San Francisco State University)

  • Jay Vavra (High Tech High, San Diego, CA)




(9) Evolutionary Innovations: Where Ecology, Development and Macroevolution Intersect. Organized by Karen Crow-Sanchez (San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA; e-mail: crow@sfsu.edu).
Scheduled for Tuesday morning, 18 August at San Francisco State University.

The origin of evolutionary novelties is central to evolutionary Developmental biology. Underlying factors associated with innovation include exploitation of existing genetic pathways in new ways via gene duplication, acquisition of new regulatory elements, and mutations in protein coding sequences. Associated factors include ecological opportunity and evolvability.

SPEAKERS:

  • Chris Amemiya (Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, Seattle, WA) "How Genomics Is Reshaping Our Ideas About Evolution."

  • Billie Swalla (University of Washington) "Origin, Evolution and Variations of the Chordate Body Plan."

  • Karen Crow (San Francisco State University) "Duplicate Hox Genes in Ray-finned Fishes and Their Role in the Evolution of Novelty Diversity."

  • Craig Miller (University of California, Berkeley, CA) "Genetic Analysis of Loss and Gain Traits in Threespine Sticklebacks."

  • David Lindberg (University of California, Berkeley, CA) "Aspects of the Evolution of Echolocation."

  • Artyom Kopp (University of California, Davis, CA) "The Origin and Diversification of Drosophila Sex Combs."

  • Antonia Monteiro (Yale University) "The Origin, Function, and Diversification of Eyespot Patterns in Butterflies."

  • Chelsea Specht (University of California, Berkeley, CA) "Innovations and Novel Structures: The Evolution of the Stamen Whorl in Tropical Gingers (Zingiberales)."

  • Suzannah Rutherford (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) "TBA"

  • Alan Love (University of Minnesota) "Evolutionary Innovations and Multidisciplinary Explanation in Biology: Prospects and Problems."



(10) Conservation in an Urban National Park. Organized by Tania Pollak (Presidio Trust and San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA), John Hafernik (San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA), and William B.N. Berry (University of California, Berkeley, CA; e-mail: bberry@uclink4.berkeley.edu).
Scheduled for all day Monday, 17 August at San Francisco State University.

Encompassing 80,000 acres and adjacent to cities containing 1.7 million people, the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) is one of the world’s largest urban national parks.  The GGNRA is also nationally and internationally renowned for its beauty and recreational opportunities.  These parklands support historic resources alongside valuable ecological resources, including 33 federally listed rare plant and animal species.  This proximity to urban communities, and high visitor use, provide both challenges for protection of park resources and opportunities to engage the public in conservation, monitoring and restoration of those resources. 

This symposium will focus on this urban national park’s challenges and opportunities, its recognition that resources cannot be conserved without the community’s participation, and its efforts to inspire that community to move from park user to park volunteer.   The symposium will also address the park’s efforts at sustainability related to resource conservation and park management. 

SPEAKERS:

  • Sue Fritzke (Supervisory Vegetation Ecologist, GGNRA, National Park Service) "Restoration in National Parks: An Overview."

  • Mark Frey (Vegetation Ecologist, Presidio Trust) and Lewis Stringer (Natural Resources Specialist, National Park Service) "Habitat Restoration on Former Remediation Sites."

  • Michele Laskowski (Propagule Collections Specialist, Golden Gate National Parks Convervancy) "Sustainable Nursery Practices."

  • Michael Chasse (Vegetation Ecologist, National Park Service) "Rare Plant Monitoring and Management."



(11) Near-Earth Objects: A Multi-dimensional Challenge. Organized by Rusty Schweickart (B612 Foundation and Association of Space Explorers (ASE) Committee on NEOs, Sonoma, CA; e-mail: rs@well.com).
Scheduled for all day Wednesday at San Francisco State University.

Near-Earth Objects are threat, resource and scientific lodestone rolled into one.  Our understanding of these primitive solar system left-overs is advancing with leaps and bounds. We track thousands of them on a nightly basis, most of which have been discovered only in the past 20 years.  We know of thousands of NEOs that course around the Sun in orbits that cross the orbit of Earth and are hence potential disasters in the making.  In the 10-15 year future our inventory of such NEOs will explode into the hundreds of thousands of which many will appear threatening.  Conversely NEOs are rich ore bodies which excite many as potential sources of consumables for future operations in space obviating the necessity for bringing tons of such materials up from the Earth’s surface.  To others they are the history of the solar system writ into millions of chapters awaiting translation.  Finally they are an emerging goal for future exploration, both robotic and human.  This multiplicity of views of NEOs is emerging as a challenge for the immediate future of space activity and will be explored in these sessions.

SPEAKERS:




(12) Materials Science and Nanotechnology. Organized by Panos Photinos (Department of Physics, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; e-mail: phaaas@sou.edu), Phillip G. Collins (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA; e-mail: collinsp@uci.edu, Shalini Prasad (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Portland State University, Portland, OR; e-mail: sprasad@pdx.edu, and Jeremy Qualls (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA; e-mail: jeremy.qualls@sonoma.edu.
Scheduled for all day Monday, 17 August at San Francisco State University.

This fifth annual symposium on Materials Science and Nanotechnology is planned for Monday, 17 August 2009 at San Francisco State University. Topics will cover the synthesis, preparation, characterization and applications of novel smart materials, including:

  • Biomaterials

  • Ferroelectrics

  • Liquid crystals and complex fluids

  • Nanomaterials

  • Polymers

  • Thin films and coatings

Please contact the organizers with ideas or abstracts for presentations. Particularly encouraged are contributions from graduate and undergraduate students.

SPEAKERS:



(13) Advancing Materials Science and Nanotechnology Education. Organized by Panos Photinos and Ellen Siem (Department of Physics, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; e-mail: phaaas@sou.edu and sieme@sou.edu) and Jeremy Qualls (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA; e-mail: jeremy.qualls@sonoma.ed.
Scheduled for one half day Tuesday, 18 August at San Francisco State University.

This session will focus on leading educational practices in Materials Science and Nanotechnology at the undergraduate and graduate level.  Contributions on curriculum design, effective experimentation, interactive simulation, and assessment methods are encouraged.  Areas of interest also include developing a student's critical thinking and student retention, with an emphasis on minority students.

Persons interested in participating in this session should contact the program organizers with ideas or abstracts.


SPEAKERS:



(14) San Francisco Bay: Tracking and Understanding a Changing Estuary. Organized by John Largier (Bodega Bay Marine Laboratory, University of California, Davis, CA; e-mail: jlargier@ucdavis.edu), Sarah Cohen (Romber Tiburon Center, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA; e-mail: sarahcoh@sfsu.edu), Kathy Boyer (Romberg Tiburon Center, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA; e-mail: katboyer@sfsu.edu), and Terry Gosliner (California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, CA; e-mail: tgosliner@calacademy.org).
Scheduled for all day Monday, 17 August at San Francisco State University.

San Francisco Bay is changing – owing to the multiple influences of watershed changes, changing human use of the Bay, climate change, and management priorities.  With attention to evolving issues, this symposium will feature invited presentations on efforts to track changing biophysical systems in the Bay and the research science that has lead to new understanding.  It will build on previous AAAS symposia and the published volumes edited by Hollibaugh and Conomos. The symposium will include speakers on invasive species, pelagic organism decline, climate change, contaminants, restoration, water circulation, phytoplankton, and more.

SPEAKERS:




(15) Good Science is Only Part of the Job:  Communicating Science to the Public. Organized by Henry J. Campbell (CEO of Ion Publications, LLC, and publisher of ScientificBlogging.com, Folsom, CA; e-mail: c/o Kristina at kristina@ionpublications.com).
Scheduled for one half day Monday, 17 August at San Francisco State University.

As science has become a larger part of the cultural landscape, researchers have frequently found themselves navigating the difficult waters of policies and politics. It has become increasingly necessary for scientists to work with the media to insure accurate portrayals of science issues so there can be better understanding by the public and therefore better decisions by policy makers. Each of the presentations will address how scientists can be better equipped to manage different media when sharing research and information with the public.

SPEAKERS:

  • Hank Campbell (founder, ScientificBlogging.com) "Why Communicating Science Is Important."

  • Michael Eisen (Department of Molecular Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA) "The Future of Peer Review Journals."

  • Eugenie C. Scott (Executive Director, National Center for Science Education) "Constructive Debates When Science and Politics Mix."

  • Michael White (Department of Genetics and Center for Genome Sciences, Washing University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO) "Interacting with Science Journalists."

  • Greg Critser (Science and Medical Journalist) "Blazing Your Own Trail: Writing Directly to the Public."




(16) Recent Advances in Pharmacology and Toxicology. Organized by Kristen Mitchell (Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, ID; e-mail: kristenmitchell@boisestate.edu) and Ken Cornell (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University, Boise, ID; e-mail: kencornell@boisestate.edu).
Scheduled for one half day Tuesday, 18 August at San Francisco State University.

The development of novel therapeutic strategies requires a detailed understanding of mechanisms that regulate homeostasis, along with an appreciation of the delicate balance that exists between the pharmacological and toxicological effects of chemical compounds. This session will focus on recent advances in understanding the pharmacological and toxicological effects of drugs, chemicals and environmental contaminants. Investigators are invited to present research on the identification of targets for new drug development, new drug screening strategies, and novel mechanisms of drug action. Emphasis will also be placed on the identification of mechanisms of toxicity for drugs, chemicals and environmental contaminants, as well as novel approaches to toxicity testing.

SPEAKERS:

  • Kristen Mitchell (Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, ID) "Regulation of Liver Homeostasis by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor."

  • Bruce O'Gara (Department of  Biological Sciences, Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA) "Worms, Brains, and Copper — A Recipe for Neural Damage."

  • Ken Cornell (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University, Boise, ID) "Antibiotic Development Targeting Bacterial CrossTtalk at the Intersection of Purine, Biotin, Polyamine Metabolism."

  • Tony Martinez (Department of  Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, ID) "Kinetic Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi MTA/SAH Nucleosidases: A New Bullseye to Fight Lymes Disease."

  • Daniel Quapp (Departments of Chemistry and Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, ID) "Parasitic Protozoans: 'It Ain't Easy Being Green."

  • Sara Heggland (Department of Biology, College of Idaho, Caldwell, ID) "The Impact of Environmental Toxinson Bone Health: Mechanisms of Cadmium–induced Osteotoxicity."

  • Reed Jacob (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University, Boise, ID) "Finding MRSA's Kryptonite: Computational Directed Combatant Pentapeptides."

  • Byron Bennett (Department of Chemistry, Idaho State University) "Pt(II) Complexes of 4,4'-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridine: Structure and Cytotoxicity."

  • Jean Pfau (Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University) "Asbestos Autotoxicus: Inhalation Toxicology and Pathogenic Autoantibodies."





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