89th Annual Meeting
HAWAII PREPARATORY ACADEMY
Waimea (on the Big Island), HI

June 15 - 20, 2008


SYMPOSIA




The following symposia are in various stages of planning for the annual meeting. The listings below are tentative and subject to change. New symposia will be added as information is received from the organizers. Check this web site for updated information or e-mail inquiries to aaaspd@sou.edu. If you plan to attend the meeting largely for one symposium, please call 541-552-6869 to confirm its status before committing travel funds.

All symposia meet on the Upper Campus of the Hawaii Preparatory Academy.


Index To Symposium Descriptions:



(1) Conservation Status of Hawaiian Native Land Snails.

(2) Past and Future of the Fauna of the Pacific Basin.

(3) Putting the Science in Informal Science Education: Pathways to Broader Impacts.

(4) New Humanities and Science Convergences: Paradise Lost and….Recoverable?

(5) North Meets South: Special Neuroscience Research Programs in the Pacific.

(6) Missionaries and Museums, Imperialists and Nationalists, State Needs and Cold-War Politics: Anthropology in East and Southeast Asia.

(7) Asian American Women: Health and Welfare.

(8) Celebration and Politics: Race and Ethnicity in America Seen Through United States World's Fairs and Expositions.

(9) Impacts of Disease on Native Hawaiian Species .

(10) Progress in Vaccine and Drug Development.

(11) Topics in Forensic Biology and Chemistry.

(12) Current Research Perspectives on Palmyra Atoll, A Remote Central Pacific Outpost for Biodiversity.

(13) Anchialine Pool Ecosystems.

(14) Materials Science and Nanotechnology.

(15) Astrophysics.

(17) Evolution and Conservation of Hawaiian Birds: Results of a 20 Year Study.

(18) Pacific Science: U.S.-Asia/Pacific Collaboration in Advancing Science in the 21st Century.

(19) Pacific Archives: Records and Special Collections.

Symposium Descriptions:


(1) Conservation Status of Hawaiian Native Land Snails. Organized by Michael Hadfield (Department of Zoology, University of Hawaii - Manoa, Honolulu, HI; e-mail: hadfield@hawaii.edu).
Scheduled for Monday, 16 June.

The Hawaiian Islands were once home to one of the greatest radiations of land snails in the world: nearly 800 endemic species in a land area less than that of New Jersey.  Due to loss of habitat, introduced predators and massive shell collecting, at least 75% of these unique species are extinct.  In this symposium, we will explore the relationships, evolution and conservation status of remaining endemic Hawaiian land snails, and consider impacts upon them of the great numbers of alien gastropod species that have become established in the islands.

SPEAKERS:

  • Brenden S. Holland (University of Hawaii at Manoa) "What Can Phylogeography Tell Us about Conservation and Management of Endemic Hawaii Land Snails?"

  • Marty Meyer (University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Succineid Life-histories and Population-level Genetic Diversification."

  • Meaghan Parker (University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Achatinellid Land Snails of the Pacific Islands: Phylogenetics, Phylogeography and Evolution."

  • Michael G. Hadfield (University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Conservation Status of Hawaii's Severely Endangered Achatinelline Tree Snails."

  • Bjorn P. Erickson (University of California, Davis) "Application of Microsatellite DNA Analyses to Studies of Inbreeding in Field and Laboratory Populations of Endangered Achantinella Species."

  • Kevin T. Hall (University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Simulating Historical Connectivity Among Endangered Tree-snail Populations: A Novel Approach to Translocation."

  • Kenneth Hayes (University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Introduction Pathways, Spread and Impacts of Alien Snails and Slugs in Hawaii."

  • Robert Cowie (University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Hawaiian Land Snail Diversity, Its Decline and Replacement by Aliens."



(2) Past and Future of the Fauna of the Pacific Basin. Organized by David R. Lindberg (Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA; e-mail: drl@berkeley.edu).
Scheduled for Wednesday, 18 June.

The Pacific Basin is one of the oldest ocean basins on Earth and its fauna renowned for its diversity and abundance. This symposium will examine the history and origin of the Pacific Ocean and the marine taxa that inhabit the basin, the islands, and the rim. Special emphasis will be placed on the relationship and interaction between the geological history of the area and the evolution of the fauna (e.g., active vs. passive margins and intertidal faunas, high and low islands and reef diversity, rifting and vent faunas, etc.), and how these interactions have led to current distributions and diversity patterns. With this background, the symposium will then explore the future of these faunas and habitats with respect to global climate change and warming. While changes in latitudinal temperature regimes are obvious consequences of global warming, the symposium will also address consequences of sea level lowering. This latter phenomenon having major effects on island size, habitat availability and even major current direction and intensity (e.g., shallowing of the Arafura Sea between Indonesia and Australia).

SPEAKERS:





(3) Putting the Science in Informal Science Education: Pathways to Broader Impacts. Organized by Meg Burke (Director of Education, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, CA; e-mail: mburke@calacademy.org).
Scheduled for Wednesday, 18 June.

Through case studies and lessons learned, the speakers will address the opportunities and challenges facing informal science education (ISE) institutions in connecting to and effectively translating science research for public audiences, in fostering science literacy and environmental stewardship, in dealing with topics such as evolution that are viewed as controversial by some, and in effectively measuring long-term impacts of their efforts. The intricate interfaces with formal education and the world of federal funding with its mandate for broader impacts will also be explored. The last portion of the symposium is reserved for a free-wheeling exchange among speakers and the audience on these topics.

SPEAKERS:





(4) New Humanities and Science Convergences: Paradise Lost and….Recoverable? Organized by Robert Louis Chianese (Department of English, California State University, Northridge, CA; e-mail: robert.chianese@csun.edu) and Carl A. Maida (UCLA Schools of Dentistry and Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; e-mail: cmaida@ucla.edu).
Scheduled for Monday, 16 June.

All earthly paradises of unspoiled land--whether tropic island, desert, valley, forest, jungle, pastoral hills--feel the deleterious effects of human encroachment. As we lose these paradises to overpopulation, development, and toxic contamination, what gets lost in us? What do human beings suffer from environmental degradation of an actual or even imagined or distant "paradise?" And what do our efforts to restore such lost paradises do to our relationship with the earth and our senses of who we are as individuals, societies, and as a species?

This symposium will give particular attention to Hawaii itself and also to the Pacific Islands.

  • Have the actual tropical "paradises" been lost beyond recovery?
  • Are the efforts of scientists, social scientists, humanists, artists, and writers to recover lost paradises compatible with native peoples' wishes?
  • In what ways are these efforts coordinated, interdisciplinary, and evidence of convergence among the disciplines?
The symposium will also consider how the issues confronting contemporary Pacific Island societies shed light on broader questions of concern to both the sciences and the humanities:
  • Has a Spoiled Eden or Lost Paradise become a model for the Earth itself? Is such a model appropriate, helpful? What does it reveal or obscure?
  • Do we need a utopian model of an earthly paradise to inspire us any more?
  • What does the literature and art of the Islands and /or of utopia as an idea foretell about their future?
  • Do current models of sustainability as applied to unique environments hold the best promise for managing their future?

SPEAKERS:





(5) North Meets South: Special Neuroscience Research Programs in the Pacific. Organized by Lawrence Duffey (Associate Dean, College of Natural Science and Mathematics, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Faribanks, AK; e-mail: fflkd@uaf.edu), LInda Chang (Department of Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI; e-mail: lchang@hawaii.edu, and Joachim Spiess ( (John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI; e-mail: spiess@pbrc.hawaii.edu).
Scheduled for Thursday, 19 June.

Although Arctic and Hawaiian Peoples are very diverse and share a variety of health and environmental issues unique to the region, they suffer from common minority health disparities such as stroke, depression, sleep disorders, cancer and developmental deficits related to environental contaminants. Scientific research exploring these health issues and disparities offers significant opportunities and challenges. Success in applying the advanced scientific tools of neuroscience to the challenges of health disparities, in general, depends upon respect for the indigenous people and minority cultures that face these health challenges.

Investigators working within the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Specialized Neuroscience Research Programs (SNRP) recognize the value of a state-of-the-art conference.

Our aims are: 1) to present ongoing research in Alaskan and Hawaiian neuroscience research priorities and 2) to expose graduate students and undergraduate students to neuroscience research with students from other neuroscience programs.

Neuroscience research that might be pursued with minority populations comprises three areas: 1) basic experimental studies; 2) observational studies; and 3) clinical trials/interventions. It would be useful to identify how these particular designs may be utilized to address research hypotheses that are uniquely translatable to Arctic and Hawaiian peoples. Despite the logistical difficulties and expense, research objecties in Alaska and Hawaii should be pursued simply because they cannot be replicated in areas more hospitable to research. Among the research questions that can be addressed most appropriately are those that derive from the unique risk profile of the inhabitants, their geographical isolation, limited dietary choices, high exposure to some contaminants and limited health care delivery, in some areas. Research priorities should consider an indigenous perspective.

The dearth of data documenting neuroscience related problems in Alaska and Hawaii is due, in part, to the formidable obstacles facing researchers. Physical obstacles include population density, weather conditions and the difficulties associated with transporting personnel, equipment and samples to the communities where many indigenous people reside. Research is additionally hampered by the shortage of researchers and trained technicians, housing, laboratories and clinic space and associated apparatus such as imaging equipment and freezers. Finally, cultural differences and prior negative experiences offer a special challenge to investigators who wish to conduct culturally sensitive research that is scientifically meritorious and of true benefit to the participants and to the overall community.

The expected outcomes from this symposium include: 1) identification of current neuroscience research that may be uniquely addressed; 2) improved communication between research scientists and clinicians around the Pacific; and 3) identification of innovative strategies and opportunities for developing diverse neuroscience research efforts and the recruitment of health professionals who can translate research benefits to medical care for at-risk Alaskan and Hawaiian native peoples.

SPEAKERS:

  • Cord M. Brundage (University of Alaska, Fairbanks) "Chronic Ethanol Exposure Causes a Persistent Developmental Deficit in the Neuroventilatory Response to CO2"

  • Marina R. Castillo (University of Alaska, Fairbanks) "Dose Dependent Effects of Arsenic Exposure on Morphology, Caspase-3 Activation, and Metabolic Status of SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells."

  • Brittany L. Davies (University of Alaska, Fairbanks) "Mu-opiod and NK1 Receptor Immunofluorescence and Involvement in the Neuroventilation of Bullfrogs. "

  • Lawrence K. Duffy (University of Alaska, Fairbanks) "North Pacific Exposure: Nrueoscience, Melatonin and Behavioral Health in the North Pacific. "

  • Anshul Pandya (University of Alaska, Fairbanks) "Pharmacology of a Novel Allosteric Modulator for Neuronal Nicotinic Receptors."



(6) Missionaries and Museums, Imperialists and Nationalists, State Needs and Cold-War Politics: Anthropology in East and Southeast Asia. Organized by Alan L. Bain (Archivist and Director, Technical Services, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washington, D.C.; e-mail: baina@si.edu).
Scheduled for Monday, 16 June.

This session documents anthropology in the Philippines, China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam. Beginning with early 16th century Spanish colonialism in the Philippines, the participants present a nation by nation compelling story of how politics and empire played a major role on cultural discussion regarding the people of their countries and how the views changed as the countries went from colonial to self-rule, the creation of national anthropology and state needs.

SPEAKERS:

  • Oona Thommes Paredes (School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University) "Colonial Exemplaries: Parsing the Birth of Evil in Philippine Colonial Ethnography."

  • Andres Rodriguez (University of Oxford) "Nation-Building and Anthropology during the Republican Period: David Crocket Graham and the Missionary Anthropological Enterprise in Western Sichuan (1922-1945)."

  • Toru Sakano (College of Economics, Nihon University, Tokyo, Japan) "Mixed-Blood and Adaptability: Japanese Racial Science, 1930s-1970s."

  • Janet Hoskins (Department of Anthropology, University of Southern California) "Colonial Surveillance, Postcolonial Controls and the Problematic Place of Anthropologists: Studying Vietnamese Caodaism in a Global Context."

  • Robert Oppenheim (Department of Asian Studies, University of Texas at Austin) "Korean War Anthropology in Japanese, American and Korean Politics."

  • Nguyen van Chinh (Department of Anthropology, Hanoi National University, Hanoi, Vietnam) "Nationalism in Vietnam's Post-Colonial Anthropology."
  • Melanie Tan Uy (Department of Anthropology, Macquarie University, Australia) "Recovering the 'Individual' in Ifugao Contemporary and Historical Representation: A Case Study from the Cordillera Region in the Phillipines."

  • Margaret Barnhill Bodemer (Department of Anthropology, University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Museums: Anthropology and the Work of Representing Culture in Contemporary Vietnam."

  • Hidekazu Sensui (Department of Business Administratiion, Kanagawa University, Kanagawa, Japan) "Reap and Sow: Scientific Investigations of the Ryukyu Islands under the United States Military Control."

  • Lynne Mackin Wolforth (Department of Anthropology, University of Hawaii-Hilo) "Culture Change in Hawai`i Viewed from the Hilo Boarding School Carpentry Shop."



(7) Asian American Women: Health and Welfare. Organized by Alan L. Bain (Archivist and Director, Technical Services, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washington, D.C.; e-mail: baina@si.edu).
Scheduled for Thursday, 19 June.

Most Americans consider Asian Americans to be members of model communities. These ideas are reflected in the number of Asian Americans who attend universities and the belief that most Asian American communities are either entrepreneurial, reflected in the companies in Silicon Valley, or small business shop owners, located within communities within high crime areas, reflected in the stories about Los Angeles and the articles on store-front businesses in Washington, D.C. The reality is that for Asian American women there are major hidden problems that Americans are unaware of, such as poverty, lack of health care and welfare support, and high rates of cancer and suicide.

This session takes a hard and frank look at the problems that Asian American women face in the United States. This is the only group in America where cancer is the leading cause of death. Cultural and linguistic barriers prevent cancer screening, but health insurance coverage and health care coverage play dominant roles in gaining access to physicians. Low income Asian immigrant women have little access to prenatal care; and the roles of women and daughters within the Asian American communities, based on race and gender, racism and sexism and the pressures to perform well lead to depression and suicide.

SPEAKERS:
  • Ninez A. Ponce (Department of Health Services, UCLA School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles) "The Role of Health Insurance and Safety Net in Reducing Cancer Screening Disparities among Asian American Women.
  • Eliza Noh (Asian American Studies Program, California State University, Fullerton) "Suicide and Depression among Asian American Women."



(8) Celebration and Politics: Race and Ethnicity in America Seen Through United States World's Fairs and Expositions. Organized by Alan L. Bain (Archivist and Director, Technical Services, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washington, D.C.; e-mail: baina@si.edu).
Scheduled for Wednesday, 18 June.

After the Civil War, the United States showed the world its growing industrial might and engineering prowess in large extravaganzas called world's fairs and invited other nations to join in the fanfare and celebration. The United States also used these exhibition cities to promote cultural identity and national pride. In so doing, the organizers of the fairs and the U. S. government both reflected America's attitude and helped shape the discussion of race and ethnicity. Over time, attitudes changed, reflecting America's changing values in foreign policy and in domestic politics.

This session examines how ideas about race and ethnicity were represented at world's fairs, starting with the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago through the 1939 New York world's fair, and looks at what may lie ahead as the United States anticipates participation in the 2010 Shanghai World Expo. In addition, the audience is shown another perspective, as the participants open the discussion from the viewpoint of Asian nations invited to participate at the fairs, the Asian American communities that joined in the fairs, and Asians that were imported to be placed on exhibition as symbols of non-civilized, non-white people and their place in what American depicted as the journey towards civilization.

SPEAKERS:
  • Robert W. Rydell (Department of History and Philosophy, Montana State University, Bozeman) "America's World's Fairs: Negotiating Boundaries of Race and Ethnicity."

  • Chuimei Ho Bronson (Independent Scholar, Bainbridge Island, WA) "Chinese-American Identity in the Making: World Fairs in Chicago and Seattle."

  • Andrea L. Stamm (Librarian, Northwestern University) "Japanese Participation in the Two Chicago World Fairs: The Road Leading to Manchuria."
  • Cherubim A. Quizon (Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ) "Modern Displays and the Skeptical 'Savage': Revisiting the Philippine Experience in St. Louis, 1904."
  • Abigail Markwyn (Department of History, Carroll College, Waukesha, WI) "Chinese and Japanese Participation in the Panama-Pacific International Exposition."



(9) Impacts of Disease on Native Hawaiian Species. Organized by Susan Jarvi (Department of of Biology, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, HI; e-mail: jarvi@hawaii.edu).
Scheduled for Thursday, 19 June.

This symposium will provide current information and discussion on the consequences of introduced disease on native Hawaiian species.  Speakers address a number of diverse host-parasite relationships involving native Hawaiian species and how they influence populations.  Various diseases currently impacting marine life including turtles, shrimp, and corals as well as terrestrial plants of Hawaii will be presented. The impacts of avian malaria, and Avipoxvirus and the potential impacts of West Nile Virus will be discussed in a variety of native birds as well as the genetic diversity of these pathogens.  Recent studies involving vaccines for West Nile virus and avian malaria will be presented.

SPEAKERS:
  • Teresa D. Lewis (Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology) "Don't Use that Shrimp for Bait!"

  • Greta Smith Aeby (Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology) "Pathology and Pathogenesis in Sea Turtles from Hawaii."

  • Thierry Work* (USGS National Wildlife Health Center) and George Balazs (National Marine Fisheries Service) "Pathology and Pathogenesis of Disease in Sea Turtles from Hawaii."

  • Carter T. Atkinson (USGS Biological Resources Discipline - Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center) "Ecology, Pathogenicity, and Impacts of Introduced Avian Pox and Malaria on Hawaiian Forest Birds."

  • Margaret E.M. Farias* (University of Hawaii at Hilo), Carter T. Atkinson (USGS Biological Resources Discipline - Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center), and Alexis Giannoulis and Susan I. Jarvi (University of Hawaii at Hilo) "Genetic Diversity of Avian Pathogens in East Hawaii."
  • D. Allan Hall* (University of Hawaii at Hilo), Carter Atkinson (USGS Biological Resources Discipline - Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center), and Susan I. Jarvi (University of Hawaii at Hilo) "Efficacy of Infected Irradiated Sporozoites as a Vaccine for Avian Malaria (Plasmodium relictum)."

  • Dennis LaPointe (USGS Biological Resources Discipline and Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center) "Experimental Infections of Hawaii Amakihi and Mortality Due to West Nile Virus."
  • Susan I. Jarvi* (University of Hawaii at Hilo), Michael M. Lieberman (Hawaii Biotech, Inc), Erik Hofmeister (USGS National Wildlife Health Center), Vivek Nerurkar (University of Hawaii at Manoa) and Teri Wong and Carolyn Weeks-Levy (Hawaii Biotech, Inc) "Protective Efficacy of a Recombinant Subunit West Nile Vaccine in Domestic Geese (Anser anser) as a Surrogate Species of the Endangered Nênê (Branta sandvicensis)."



(10) Progress in Vaccine and Drug Development. Organized by Ken Cornell (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University; e-mail: kencornell@boisestate.edu).
Scheduled for Wednesday, 18 June.

Recent years have seen an increasing threat to human, animal and plant health due to the spread of exotic diseases and the emergence of drug resistant microbes and neoplasms. This session will focus on recent developments in vaccines and chemotherapeutics for infectious diseases and cancer. Investigators are invited to present research on identification of targets for antibiotic/chemotherapeutic development, new drug synthesis and screening strategies, and the development of novel adjuvants and vaccines. Also included in this session will be work on elucidating mechanisms of pathogenesis and cellular invasion, and the identification of emergent infectious diseases. Investigators with relevant work from the fields of cell biology, microbiology, chemistry, biochemistry and materials science are encouraged to attend and sponsor cross-disciplinary discussions.

SPEAKERS:





(11) Topics in Forensic Biology and Chemistry. Organized by Ken Cornell (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University; e-mail: kencornell@boisestate.edu).
Scheduled for Thursday, 19 June.

The increasing sensitivity of instrumentation and development of new molecular techniques have led to their increased use in the broad field of forensics to do such things as provide positive identification of crime scene samples, indicate paternity, and the identify trafficking networks in wildlife poaching. Investigators working in forensics and related fields are invited to present talks on the results of clinical/anthropological studies, the use of modern forensic techniques, and descriptions of problems currently encountered in forensic labs. Included in this session will be talks on the development of novel forensic reagents, and new uses for chemical instrumentation in sample identification.

SPEAKERS:





(12) Current Research Perspectives on Palmyra Atoll, A Remote Central Pacific Outpost for Biodiversity. Organized by Healy Hamilton (Center for Biodiversity Research and Information, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, CA; e-mail: hhamilton@calacademy.org ) and Ellen Druffel (School of Physical Sciences, University of Calilfornia Irvine, Irvine, CA; e-mail: mailto:edruffel@uci.edu )
Scheduled for Monday, 16 June.

Lying a few degrees north of the equator and east of the dateline, Palmyra atoll consists of almost 700 acres of emergent tropical islets surrounded by the most intact tropical marine wilderness in U.S. jurisdiction. Its location in the deep Central Pacific and singular history of low human occupancy provide conditions that support healthy colonies of nesting seabirds, rare sea turtles, coconut crabs, mangrove and tropical wet forests, and a diverse, healthy coral reef ecosystem with an intact trophic structure. The surrounding oceanic region steers the machinery of global climate and has high predictive value regarding the character of ENSO cycles. For marine biologists, Palmyra provides a window into historic coral reef ecosystems now everywhere altered by human influences. For biogeochemists, the atoll provides a living archive of Holocene climate from a key region with little existing data. For conservation scientists, Palmyra is a laboratory in which to study the process of restoration in a natural system free from confounding human influence. In this symposium, we will explore this fascinating and unique central Pacific atoll. The emphasis will be on the biodiversity of Palmyra, its composition and biogeographic relationships. Results from recent ecological research will demonstrate the value of Palmyra as a laboratory that can advance the conservation of island and coastal systems worldwide

SPEAKERS:

  • Jim Maragos (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) ""

  • Bruce Mundy (NOAA) "Biodiversity and Biogeograpy of the Fishes of Palmyra Atoll."

  • Rusty Brainard (NOAA) ""

  • Doug McCauley (Stanford Univrsity) "Simulating Overfishing in the Near-Pristine Coral Reefs of Palmyra Atoll."

  • Alex Wegmann (University of Hawaii) "Rats and the Reproductive Ecology of Terminalia catappa at Palmyra Atoll: An Example of How Invasive Rodents Influence Forest Structure on Low Tropical Islands."

  • Hillary Young (Stanford University) "Cocos nucifera Drives Nutrient Depletion via Changes in Seabird Density at Palmyra Atoll."

  • David McGuire (Sea Stewards) "t.b.a."

  • Healy Hamilton (California Academy of Sciences) "Conservation Science on Palmyra Atoll."
  • Robert Fisher (USGS) "t.b.a."

  • Scott Godwin (Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology) "t.b.a."
  • Stuart Sandin (Scripps Institutioin of Oceanography) "t.b.a."
  • Jennifer Smith (University of California, Santa Barbara) "t.b.a."

  • Elizabeth M.P. Madin (University of California, Santa Barbara) "Behavioral Effects of Fishing on Coral Reefs."

  • Edith Nonner (formerly University of Hawaii and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Pacific Remote Islands NWRC) "Scale Population Dynamics and Control Measures and the Status of Pisonia grandis at Palmyra Atoll VWR in 2007."



(13) Anchialine Pool Ecosystems. Organized by Sallie Beavers (Ecologist, National Park Service, Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park, Kailua Kona, HI; e-mail: Sallie_Beavers@nps.gov).
Scheduled for Monday, 16 June.

Anchialine pools are brackish-water pools that lack surface connection to the ocean, but are hydrologically connected to ground water and the ocean through the permeable aquifer.  Anchialine habitats are unique ecosystems worldwide and support rare endemic species, including undescribed species. The Department of Land and Natural Resources estimates that there are between 600 and 700 anchialine pools in the state of Hawaii. Of these, the majority are found on the Kona Coast of Hawaii Island.  Anchialine pools are culturally important to Hawaiians and provided the fresh-water resource necessary to settle the arid Kona coast more than 800 years ago.  Today, Hawaii's anchialine pools are increasingly threatened by introductions of alien species, unregulated collection of rare species, infilling by land-use development, alterations to water quality and water quantity from land development and ground-water withdrawals. Effective management tools and regulations need to be developed and implemented.  This symposium will summarize the current knowledge of, and threats to, the anchialine pool ecosystem, as well as explore new avenues for research, management, and conservation.

SPEAKERS:
  • Richard Brock, Julie H. Bailey-Brock and Alan K.H. Kam (University of Hawaii, Manoa) "Status of the Hawaiian Anchialine Resource ‑ 36 Years of Observations."

  • David Foote (USGS) "Biology of Anchialine Pools."

  • Eric Grossman (USGS), Delwyn Oki, Karen Knee, Adina Paytan, and Sallie Beavers (National Park Service) "Submarine Groundwater Discharge and Its Role in Anchialine Pond Dynamics of Kaloko‑Honokohau National Historical Park on the Arid Kona Coast of Hawaii."

  • Atlantis Russ (University of Hawaii, Hilo) "Population Structure of Metabetaus lohena."

  • Scott Santos (Auburn University) "Wildlife Forensics: What DNA Reveals about the Biology and Conservation of Organisms from Hawaiian Anchialine Environments."
  • David Chai and Ambyr Mokiao-Lee (Hualalai Four Seasons Resort) "Reviving a Native Anchialine Community - A Case Study of Rotenone Use to Eradicate Gambusia affinis in Two Anchialine Pools at Hualalai Resort, Kaupulehu-Kona, Hawaii."

  • Sallie Beavers, Mariska Weijerman, Elizabeth Marrack, and Kelly Kozar (National Park Service) "Anchialine Pool Conservation in a Rapidly Urbanizing Environment."
  • Lorena Wada (US Fish and Wildlife Service) "Anchialine Pools and Candidate Conservation."



(14)Materials Science and Nanotechnology. Organized by Philippe Binder (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, HI; e-mail: pbinder@hawaii.edu), Shalini Prasad (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Portland State University, Portland, OR; e-mail: sprasad@pdx.edu), Klaus Sattler (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI; e-mail: sattler@hawaii.edu), and Panos Photinos (Department of Chemistry, Physics, Engineering and Materials Science, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; e-mail: phaas@sou.edu).
Scheduled for Monday, 16 June.

This fourth annual symposium on Materials Science and Technology will cover the synthesis, preparation, characterization and applications of novel smart materials, including:

  • Biomaterials
  • Ferroelectrics
  • Liquid Crystals and Complex Fluids
  • Nanomaterials
  • Polymers
  • Thin Films and Coatings

Contributions from graduate and undergraduate students are particularly encouraged.

SPEAKERS:





(15) Astrophysics. Organized by Robert A. Fox (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, HI; e-mail: rfox@hawaii.edu), John G. Learned (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI; e-mail: jgl@phys.hawaii.edu), and Panos Photinos (Department of Chemistry, Physics, Engineering and Materials Science, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; e-mail: phaas@sou.edu).
Scheduled for Monday, 16 June.

SPEAKERS:





(17) Evolution and Conservation of Hawaiian Birds: Results of a 20 Year Study. Organized byLeonard A. Freed (Department of Zoology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI; e-mail: lfreed@hawaii.edu), and Rebecca L. Cann (Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI; e-mail: rcann@hawaii.edu).
Scheduled for Wednesday, 18 June.

This symposium will present 6 papers, each of which is based on long-term study of Hawaiian forest birds at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge. These birds are renowned among evolutionary biologists for their spectacular adaptive radiation as reflected in their plumage coloration and bill morphology. They are equally well known among conservation biologists for extinction and endangerment. The long term study reported here will extend the study of adaptation in these birds to life history and behavior, and extend the study of extinction and endangerment to introduced species ranging from pathogens to ectoparasites to ecological competitors for food. Several papers will be about special adaptation and problems of the endangered Hawaii akepa, one of the Hawaiian honeycreepers. The 6 papers will be: (1) Introduction to Hawaiian birds through life history, (2) Adaptation in the Hawaii akepa to breed and molt during a seasonal food decline, (3) Seasonal variation in sex allocation in the Hawaii akepa, (4) Increase in avian malaria in upper elevation forests of Hawaii, (5) Explosive increase in ectoparasites in Hawaiian forest birds, (6). Incipient extinction of Hawaiian forest birds from competition with an introduced competitor. The presenters will be the two organizers and their current and past undergraduate and graduate students. Each paper will include data collected over no fewer than 13 years.

SPEAKERS:
  • Rebecca L. Cann (Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Origin, Radiatioin and Current Status of Hawaiian Birds."

  • Leonard A. Freed (Department of Zoology, University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Life Hostory Diversification of Hawaiian Honeycreepers."

  • Matthew C. Medeiros (Department of Biology, University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Adaptation in a Hawaiian Bird to Breed during a Seasonal Decline in Food."

  • Rebecca L. Cann (Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Sexual Dimorphism and the Evolution of Seasonal Variatiion of Sex Allocation in a Hawaiian Bird."

  • Gustav R. Bodner (Department of Zoology, University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Explosive Increase in Ectoparasites in Hawaiian Forest Birds."

  • Leonard A. Freed (Department of Zoology, University of Hawaii at Manoa) "Why Introduced Birds are the Most Important Threat to Hawaiian Forest Birds."
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(18) Pacific Science: U.S.-Asia/Pacific Collaboration in Advancing Science in the 21st Century. Organized byBurke Burnett (Pacific Science Association; e-mail: burnett@bishopmuseum.org).
Scheduled for Wednesday, 18 June.

This symposium will bring together scientists with experience in collaborative international research in Asia and the Pacific to discuss the opportunities and challenges for enhanced collaboration between American scientists and their counterparts in the Asia-Pacific region. There are many examples of very successful U.S./Asia-Pacific scientific collaborations. Yet collaborative endeavors between U.S. individuals and institutions and those in countries with less sophisticated scientific infrastructure and academic capacity can also present challenges for researchers. While addressing broader issues of collaboration, a focus of this symposium will be to present examples of successful efforts of designing and conducting research that has both advanced scientific research, and also advanced goals such as capacity-building and information repatriation that are important to less-developed nation-states. Regional scientific organizations, such as the Pacific Science Association, the ICSU's Regional Office for Asia & Pacific, and the Science Council of Asia, are addressing these issues.  Given increasingly critical issues of common concern such as climate change, biodiversity loss, and the demographic, environmental and social implications of globalization, greater emphasis on research that is both multidisciplinary in nature and international in scope is critical to advancing our scientific understanding of these issues  and in providing information required to make scientifically sound decisions to societies and policymakers.

SPEAKERS:
  • Nancy Lewis (Director, Research Programs, East-West Center) "Climate Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases in the Pacific Islands."

  • Peter Brewer (Senior Scientist, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute) "Exploring the Unanticipated Consequences of Ocean Acidification by Fossil Fuel CO2."

  • Samuel Pooley (Director, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, NOAA, Honolulu) "International Scientific Collaboration at the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center."

  • Jack Regalado (Assistant Curator and Program Coordinator, Vietnam Botanical Conservation Program, Missouri Botanical Garden) "International Cooprative Research and Training in the Study of Plant Diversity in Vietnam."

  • Stuart Davies (Director, Center for Tropical Forest Science) "Long Term Forest Plots in Thailand, Malaysia, Taiwan, PRC and PNG."

  • Burke Burnett (Executive Secretary, Pacific Science Association) "The Pacific Science Association: 88 Years of Facilitating Science for Society and the Environment in the Asia-Pacific Region."

  • Scott Hauger (Research Professor in Science, Technology and Policy, Desert Research Institute) "Global Collaboration to Address Global Problems: Trans-Pacific Collaboration for Research on Global Change and Sustainable Living on Arid Lands."

  • David Schindel (Executive Secretary, Consortium on the Barcode of Life) "DNA Barcoding Collaborations in Fish among USA, Canada, Australia, Taiwan, and Pacific Island States."
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(19) Hawaii Archives: Records and Special Collections. Organized by Alan L. Bain (Archivist and Director, Technical Services, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washington, D.C.; e-mail: baina@si.edu).
Scheduled for Thursday, 19 June.

Institutional records, special subject collections and individual personal papers provide public and scholar with access to the celebrations of life and death, important and trivial events, and the struggles of institutions and individuals, without which we would be bereft of our history and knowledge of the past.  Archivists and librarians (who are in charge of manuscript collections) collect, preserve and describe this historical material when they become available and are transferred to a repository, where they are maintained for as long as the informational contents are serviceable.  This session is devoted to a discussion of some of the rich and varied archives that document the history of Hawaii and the life of Hawaii's people.

Hawaii's plantation records are a vast resource of economic, social, environmental and financial information. They document the living quarters of workers, their medical history, and labor, ethnic and racial tensions.  This discussion includes the records of the Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association (HSPA); lesser known plantation records and other industry records housed at the Mamiya Medical Heritage Center in Honolulu and the Lyman Memorial House Museum in Hilo; the papers of Dr. Nils Larsen, associated with HSPA; and observations why some plantations never sent their records to an archive and/or destroyed their records.    

Hawaii's medical records can also be used for anthropological research. The researcher must be cognizant that such records come under privacy, ethical and practical issues regarding use and access to the files. One such group of records is maintained at the Kapi`olani Medical Center for Women and Children. Dr. Charles Wetmore, who arrived in Hawaii in 1840, was sent from Boston with the Protestant Missions to the Sandwich Islands.  His daughter, Frances, became the first woman doctor in Hawaii.  The Wetmore family papers are located in the archives at the Lyman Museum, Hilo.

Archives are not only available as research material, but may also be used in developing exhibitions.  Emma Metcalf Beckley Nakuina, an intellectual who was descended from Hawaiian chiefs on her mother's side, was curator at the Hawaii National Museum from 1883 to 1887.  While there, she provided artifacts and other documents for a number of world's fairs.  Recently, an exhibition regarding her activities was displayed by the Hawaii State Library.

SPEAKERS:

  • Boido, Marcella Alohalani (Research and Database Associate, Retinopathy of Prematurity Subproject, Research in Minorities in Institutions Project, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, HI) "Adventures in Medical Archives: Accessing and Using Medical Archives and Databases at Kapi`olani Medical Center for Women and Children."

  • Burke, Libby (Archivist, Lyman Museum, Hilo, HI) "The Doctors Wetmore: Hilo's First Family of Medicine."

  • Minatodani, Dore (Librarian, Hawaii Specialist, Hawaiian Collection, University of Hawaii at Manoa Library, Honolulu, HI) "Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association Plantation Archives."

  • Wong Smith, Helen (Librarian and Archivist, Edwin H. Mookini Library, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, HI) "Identifying and Accessing the Lesser Known Archival Collections."

  • Hoverson, Martha (Hawaii Documents Librarian, Hawaii and Pacific Collection, Hawaii State Library, Honolulu, HI) "Contribution of the Hawaiian National Museum to the Hawaii Exhibits at World's Faris in the 1880s."
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