89th Annual Meeting
HAWAII PREPARATORY ACADEMY
Waimea (on the Big Island), HI

June 15 - 20, 2008


FIELD TRIPS


All field trips are open to meeting registrants and members of their families. Due to limited space, advance registration is required for all trips. Reservation and payment of field trip fee(s) are included on the Advance Registration Form. NOTE: A $10 field trip registration fee will be added to the cost of the first field trip for each person not registered for the AAAS Pacific Division meeting. Non-registrants pay this fee only once, regardless of whether they participate in one or two field trips.

A full refund will be granted if a trip is cancelled by the Division. If a registrant cancels via e-mail, phone or written notification postmarked before May 18, the registrant will receive a refund of the paid fee(s) less a $10 processing charge. Credit card refunds are subject to an additional 3.25% charge on the entire original billing to help cover the fees the Division pays to the credit card companies.

All field trips depart from the James M. Taylor Commons (map).

Tuesday, June 17, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Field Trip: Kona Coffee Tour
OFFICIAL Web Site Kona Historical Society
Departs from the parking area above the James M. Taylor Commons (map). Led by Anne Sturz, Pacific Division President-elect, this tour starts by traveling south of Kailua-Kona to Captain Cook, where participants will tour the Kona Historical Society's Kona Coffee Living History Farm. From there, the group will drive a short distance to Buddha's Cup and Kona Lulana Farms to tour a working coffee farm. Then the group will travel a few miles to the Holualoa Kona Coffee Company to take a self-guided tour that includes roasting and bagging facilities. The group will then head to the International Marketplace for a late lunch (on your own) in the food court and a talk by Bobbi Caputo, a local artist whose art is created in a primitive/folk art style and reflects scenes from her childhood memories growing up picking coffee on the local plantations. There should be a bit of time for shopping before the return trip to HPA. Includes transportation, and entrance fees. Lunch is on your own. Cost: $55.


Tuesday, June 17, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Field Trip: Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park (Place of Refuge)
OFFICIAL Web Site

Departs from the parking area above the James M. Taylor Commons (map). Pu`uhonua o Honaunau Natinal Historical Park is a wonderfully preserved peek into traditional Hawaiian life. It was the residence of the ali`i (royal chiefs) and the locatin of the pu`uhonua, a place of refuge for defeated warriors, noncombatants in times of war and those people that violated the kapu (sacred laws). This place of refuge was used for several centuries until 1819 when Kamehameha II abolished traditional religious practices. In 1961 it was made into a national historical park.

This trip is divided into two sections: 1) exploration of the royal grounds and place of refuge and 2) a walking tour to the village of Ki`ilae. Please refer to the section describing the walking part of this tour to determine whether this trip will be too strenuous for yourself and pay very careful attention to the section on what to wear and what to bring at the end of the description for this trip. Participants will be escorted by Tom De Aguiar, a cultural guide and park ranger who has worked in the park for 30 years.

In the first section of the trip, participants will see sights such as the Great Wall. Built around 1550, the wall is 17 feet thick and ten feet high. It separates the royal grounds from the place of refuge. Participants will explore the grounds wehre the ali`i (chiefs) used to live. These grounds, along with the royal canoe landing site that was used to enter and the leave the area, were banned to commoners. One of the most spectacular sights is the Hale o Keawe, a temple (heiau) that housed the bones of the ali`i and wehre ki`i (carved wooden statues) still stand watch. Finally, participants will see the site of this most famous place of refuge, where one could flee to is s/he committed a crime, or kapu. Here, one could be absolved by a priest, thus escaping the death penalty and being allowed to return home.

In the second section of the trip, participants will take a walking tour along an 1871 trail for 2 miles each way (a 4 mile round trip). This trail takes you through three different ahupua`a (land divisions), from Honaunau to Keokea and Ki`ilae. Keokea ahupua`a features livestock pens from more recent historical times as well as a holua slide, where Hawaiian royalty once sped down the steep slope at great speeds for sport. Participants will then view the dramatic Keanae`e Cliffs, over which lava used to flow, breaking off at the top. The Ahupua`a of Ki`ilae contains the abandoned village of Ki`ilae, where inhabitants lived traditionally from the sea until the 1930s. The structures that endure along the 1871 trail allow participants to see firsthand the way people once lived in the area. Along the trail participants will encounter platforms that served as heiau (religious structures), rock walls that were constructed to pen livestock, and housing platforms built by the people who once lived along the coast. Participants will also encounter many plants that native Hawaiians used for food, medicine and making everything from utensils to rope.

After this walk participants can jump into the water at the adjacent snorkel spot to see one of the island’s best coral reefs or spend time continuing to explore on their own.

What to bring: Walking clothes and shoes, sunscreen, hats and cover up clothing, swimsuit and towel (if taking a dip). It is a very hot area and adjacent to the ocean and you may be outside for 4 hours so make sure you are cool and protected. Bring extra water (there is some with lunch) and snacks if you require more food throughout the day.

Includes transportation, applicable entrance fees, sack lunch, and water. Limited to 20 participants. Cost: $70.


Tuesday, June 17, 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Field Trip: Kilauea Volcano
OFFICIAL Web Site USGS Hawaii Volcano Observatory
OFFICIAL Web Site Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Departs from the parking area above the James M. Taylor Commons (map). Travel with Robert (Bob) Christiansen (ret., U.S.G.S. and former head of the Hawaii Volcano Observatory) east and south on Highway 19 through Hilo to Hawaii Volcano National Park for a close-up look at Kilauea, the most active volcano on the island. We'll visit the Hawaii Volcano Observatory (HVO), which sits on the edge of Kilauea's crater, where staff will orient us to the HVO and Kilauea. After eating lunch, we will join with U.S.G.S. and National Park Service folks to drive around and explore the rim of Kilauea. Time permitting, we will drive down Chain of Craters Road, perhaps getting as far as the lava flow that has permanently blocked the road as lava flowed into the ocean. Dinner will be on your own at the Kilauea Military Camp, after which we’ll head home. Should an active area of the volcano be accessible, we'll concentrate our time in that area. Includes transportation, applicable entrance fees, sack lunch, and water. Dinner is on your own. Cost: $55.

Tuesday, June 17, 8:00 p.m. to about 10:00 p.m.
Field Trip: Mauna Kea Obsrvatories and Stargazing
OFFICIAL Web Site Mauna Kea Observatories
OFFICIAL Web Site Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station
OFFICIAL Web Site 'Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawaii
Departs from the parking area above the James M. Taylor Commons (map). Plans are to depart Waimea and travel to the Science and Technology Park on the University of Hawaii, Hilo campus, location of headquarters for several Mauna Kea observatories and also the `Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai`i. As time permits, we will visit the headquarters of one of the observatories and also briefly tour the `Imiloa Center, where we will also eat lunch (on your own). After lunch, we'll travel to the Visitor's Center at about the 9,000 foot level of Mauna Kea, where we'll spend some time acclimating to the altitude. Departing the Visitor Center, we will drive to the summit (almost 14,000 foot elevation) to tour some observatories. Heading down, we will eat dinner at the Hale Pohaku facility and then go back to the Visitor’s Center for nighttime stargazing. We plan to return to HPA no later than 10:00 p.m.

IMPORTANT MEDICAL ALERT: The summit of Mauna Kea is almost 14,000 feet in elevation. Ascent to this altitude exposes people to a significant reduction in atmospheric pressure, which can result in a variety of medical conditions, including severe illness and even death. Visitors to the summit may experience headaches, tiredness, lack of appetite, insomnia, reduced intellectual capacity, impaired exercise/exertion tolerance, and possible vomiting. It is also possible to develop one or more of the more severe mountain sicknesses, pulmonary or cerebral edema, both of which can be fatal. The altitude may also aggravate pre-existing conditions, particularly cardiovascular, diabetes, and respiratory diseases. Individuals with these conditions are advised to seriously reconsider the advisability of visiting the summit of Mauna Kea. The Pacific Division strongly urges all visitors to bring the above information to the attention of their medical practitioner and to seek medical advice and clearance before visiting the summit. Under no circumstances will visitors under the age of sixteen (16) be allowed on this field trip. Minors between the ages of 16 and 18 require parental permission.

All participants must download the "Information and Safety Guidelines for Visitors to the Mauna Kea Summit" (click here) and return pages 2 and 3 initialed at the bottom and page 4 signed before they will be allowed to participate in this field trip. Please contact the Pacific Division office if you need more information.

Includes transportation, applicable entrance fees, and dinner. Lunch is on your own. Cost: $80.

Tuesday, June 17, 8:00 a.m. to about 4:00 p.m.
Field Trip: Reef Snorkeling      
Departs from the parking area above the James M. Taylor Commons (map). Visit two fringing reef spots on the west side of the Big Island. Start in Kahalu`u Bay, a diverse and easily accessible reef just south of Kona. Get an orientation from a marine scientist in the Pavilion at the Bay to learn about Hawaii's unique reef life and snorkeling guidelines and then snorkel in the shallow sheltered bay. Learn about different species and their purpose in the bay with the marine scientist. 25% of all reef fish in Hawaii are endemic- therefore you can see a number of fish that are found nowhere else in the world. Talk to volunteer ReefTeachers that are on the beach about some of the species in the Bay. Have lunch and see some of the sights in Kailua- Kona. Then head up to Puako Bay, one of the most beautiful reefs on the island. Snorkel in the bay or walk along the beach front, explore the tidepools or visit the nearby Petroglyph fields--one of the largest on the island.

If you are interested in participating in this trip, you must provide the following information on the Advance Registration Form: your shoe size (in order to get properly fitting swim fins) and your experience in the water swimming and snorkeling: Inexperienced.....Fairly Experienced.....Very Experienced

Includes transportation, guide, snorkels, masks and swim fins. Lunch in Kona is on your own. Fee: $60.

Friday, June 20, 7:30 a.m. to about 9:00 p.m.
Field Trip: Kilauea Volcano
OFFICIAL Web Site USGS Hawaii Volcano Observatory
OFFICIAL Web Site Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Departs from the parking area above the James M. Taylor Commons (map). Travel with Robert (Bob) Christiansen (ret., U.S.G.S. and former head of the Hawaii Volcano Observatory) east and south on Highway 19 through Hilo to Hawaii Volcano National Park for a close-up look at Kilauea, the most active volcano on the island. We'll visit the Hawaii Volcano Observatory (HVO), which sits on the edge of Kilauea's crater, where staff will orient us to the HVO and Kilauea. After eating lunch, we will join with U.S.G.S. and National Park Service folks to drive around and explore the rim of Kilauea. Time permitting, we will drive down Chain of Craters Road, perhaps getting as far as the lava flow that has permanently blocked the road as lava flowed into the ocean. Dinner will be on your own at the Kilauea Military Camp, after which we'll head home. Should an active area of the volcano be accessible, we'll concentrate our time in that area. Includes transportation, applicable entrance fees, sack lunch, and water. Dinner is on your own. Cost: $55.

Friday, June 20, 8:00 a.m. - about 4:00 p.m.
Field Trip: Reef Snorkeling      
Departs from the parking area above the James M. Taylor Commons (map). Visit two fringing reef spots on the west side of the Big Island. Start in Kahalu`u Bay, a diverse and easily accessible reef just south of Kona. Get an orientation from a marine scientist in the Pavilion at the Bay to learn about Hawaii's unique reef life and snorkeling guidelines and then snorkel in the shallow sheltered bay. Learn about different species and their purpose in the bay with the marine scientist. 25% of all reef fish in Hawaii are endemic. Therefore, you can see a number of fish that are found nowhere else in the world. Talk to volunteer ReefTeachers that are on the beach about some of the species in the Bay. Have lunch and see some of the sights in Kailua- Kona. Then head up to Puako Bay, one of the most beautiful reefs on the island. Snorkel in the bay or walk along the beach front, explore the tidepools or visit the nearby Petroglyph fields--one of the largest on the island.

If you are interested in participating in this trip, you must provide the following information on the Advance Registration Form: your shoe size (in order to get properly fitting swim fins) and your experience in the water swimming and snorkeling: Inexperienced.....Fairly Experienced.....Very Experienced

Includes transportation, guide, snorkels, masks and swim fins. Lunch in Kona is on your own. Fee: $60.

Friday, June 20, 7:30 a.m. to about 9:00 p.m.
Field Trip: Kaloko-Honokohau National Park
OFFICIAL Web Site

Departs from the parking area above the James M. Taylor Commons (map). Led by Cindi Punihaole will spend the first hour looking at the fishponds in the park with her and another cultural park ranger. Then the group will go to the visitors center and from the visitors center take a 1.5 mile hike (on an unpaved trail--sturdy tennis shoes or better are requiured) with Cindi and the head ranger to another point in the park where they will be picked up. Along the way the group will learn about the alkaline ponds, natural resources, petroglyphs, holua slide (the rock slide the ali`i used to slide down) and cultural significance of the area. Cindi's family is from that area so she can tell participants all about her family's kuleana or responsibility with the land. Afterward we'll drive a short distance into Kona for lunch on your own and a bit of time to sightsee/shop.

What to bring: Walking clothes and sturdy tennis shoes or hiking boots, sunscreen, hats and cover up clothing. It can be very warm in this area and adjacent to the ocean. You may be outside for 2.5 to 3 hours so make sure you are cool and protected. Bring extra water (there is some with lunch) and snacks if you require more food throughout the day.

Includes transportation, interpreters, and guide. Cost: $60.





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