100th Annual Meeting
Southern Oregon University
Ashland, Oregon
June 18 - 21, 2019

SYMPOSIA and SPECIAL PROGRAMS



The following symposia are in various stages of planning for the annual meeting. The listings below are tentative and subject to change. New symposia will be added as information is received from the organizers. Check this web site regularly for updated information. Inquiries can be emailed to aaaspd@sou.edu. If you plan to attend the meeting largely for one symposium, please call 541–552–6869 to confirm its status before committing travel funds.

Please bookmark this page and check back frequently, as this information is frequently updated as new information becomes available. Abstracts for all of the presentations are expected to be available for downloading by the end of April, perhaps earlier.



Index to Symposia, Workshops, and Special Programs by Sponsoring Sections
Click above for complete listing by sponsoring section




Index To Symposia and Special Programs by Name

Scroll down for descriptions and abstracts.
Each listing is a symposium unless otherwise indicated.


(1) Artists and Scientists Respond to Climate Change with Science-Themed Works in Art, Literature, and the Humanities

(2) Puttin’ the Public to Work – Community Science around the World!

(3) History and Philosophy of Science

(4) West Coast Fairs: China and Chinese American Participation, Indigenous Americans at the Fair, and United States Attitudes and Immigration Policies

(5) ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION: Citizen Science, Climate Change and Fire in Western North America: A Roundtable Discussion

(6) Bosie Extravaganza in Set Theory (BEST)

(7) Seeing with New Eyes: The Role of New Scientific Techniques and Perspectives in Revolutionizing the Search for the First Americans

(8) Vietnam: Vietnamese Americans in Orange County, How Anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim Xenophobia Resonate in the Vietnamese Community; Vietnam Emigration and the Return of Vietnamese Americans and Vietnamese from Eastern Europe Businesspeople to Vietnam SYMPOSIUM WITHDRAWN FROM PROGRAM

(9) Library Science Symposium SYMPOSIUM WITHDRAWN FROM PROGRAM

(10) Active Learning in Sciences: What Really Works and How To Implement It

(11) Pollinators, Buzzways, and Private Gardens: A Grass Roots Effort to Save Pollinators in the Rogue Valley

(12) Opportunities and Challenges for Large Data Sets and their Analysis in Contemporary and Future Science

(13) Transforming Agriculture in the Rogue Valley: Moving from Mono-culture to “Agra-diversity”

(14) All of Us Research Program: The Precision Medicine Initiative

(15) Character, Illusion, Lighting, Sound and Madness as Viewed by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival

(16) How Core Equipment Facilities are Changing the Nature of Scientific Investigations in Universities

(17) The Social, Economic and Political Impacts of Climate Change

(18) FIRES!!!

(19) Adaptations to Climate Change in Oregon Wineries

(20) Influencing Local and Regional Public Policy on Climate Change

(21) Environmental and Agricultural Measuring and Monitoring in the Rogue Valley

(22) Engaging the Public in Science: Where Are They and How do We Get There?

(23) The Future of Scientific Publication in a Time of Increasingly Complex and Distributed Science

(24) TOWN HALL EVENT: Different Styles, Different Insights, Different Science: Using Maker Tech to Teach STEM

(25) TOWN HALL EVENT: Advancing STEM: Increasing Diversity in Academia and Industry

(26) Strategies for Active Learning in Undergraduate Education

(27) TOWN HALL EVENT: What Can Scientific Societies Do For You?

(28) The Opiod Epidemic: Up Close and Personal

(29) Inverventions in Aging

(30) Current Challenges in Corrosion and Engineering

(32) Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: SUSTAIN!!!




Symposium and Special Program Descriptions
Each listing is a symposium unless otherwise indicated.

(1) Artists and Scientists Respond to Climate Change with Science-Themed Works in Art, Literature, and the Humanities. Organizer: Robert L. Chianese (Retired, Department of English, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA; rlchianese@gmail.com).
SCHEDULED FOR Wednesday afternoon, 19 June.

Public acceptance of human-caused climate change has increased by direct and indirect experience of well-publicized calamities throughout the nation. Fires, droughts, floods, hurricanes, debris flows, excessive heat and cold have alerted people to the radically changed conditions on the planet.

Yet, many in the arts and humanities have continued to depict the physical world in general and nature in particular in traditional ways. Landscapes, nature poems, novels often avoid the new harsh realities that would undermine the use of nature as a background setting rather than a dangerous protagonist in the current human drama. Even the familiar calendar art of environmental organizations stays focused on glorious, almost pristine images of nature. As radical as climate disturbance has become, the underlying western paradigm in the arts and humanities of a beneficent and supportive nature is hard to change.

The Arts and Humanities centered on climate change can help propel this necessary ideological shift. This interdisciplinary symposium invites papers on this topic from artists, humanists, and scientists alike. We would also welcome poems and excerpts of fiction that would be read in the symposium, along with the papers. If enough poets and writers contribute, we could set up a separate reading during lunch or another convenient time .

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            

(2) Puttin’ the Public to Work – Community Science around the World!. Organizers: Robert Hickey (Department of Geography, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA; rhickey@cwu.edu) and Eric Graham (Department of Biology, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA; eric.graham@cwu.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Wednesday morning, 19 June.

This symposium will focus on different aspects of how scientists involve the public in their work. Topics will range from more traditional aspects of citizen science (having volunteers directly assist researchers in the field) to undergraduate-focused research (running a distant field station with the assistance of the local community) and crowdsourced observations (precipitation, plant phenology, and species occurrences).

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            

(3) History and Philosophy of Science. Organizers: Roberta Millstein (University of California, Bavis, CA; rlmillstein@ucdavis.edu) and Sarah Roe (Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT; roes1@southernct.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR all day Wednesday, 19 June.

To more fully understand science, we must know something about its history, its central concepts, and its methods – the domain of the history and philosophy of science. This session will examine topics in the biological sciences, the medical sciences, and more, from historical and philosophical perspectives, in order to enrich our understanding of these areas as well as serve as a springboard for broader contextual knowledge about science. We seek to promote dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and historians to work toward an interdisciplinary understanding of these sciences and science more generally. Some topics that the proposed sessions will analyze:

  • The history of scientific and medical advancements and contemporary implications
  • Aldo Leopold's ecological thinking
  • Medical imaging and uncertainty
  • Notions of biodiversity
  • Ecology and ecological functioning

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            

(4) West Coast Fairs: China and Chinese American Participation, Indigenous Americans at the Fair, and United States Attitudes and Immigration Policies. Organizer: Alan L. Bain (Retired, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; Baina@si.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Friday morning, 21 June.

During the first two decades of the twentieth century four expositions were held on the Pacific Coast, Portland (1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition), Seattle (1909, Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition), San Francisco (1915, Panama-Pacific International Exposition), and San Diego (1915-1916, Panama-California Exposition). How the American West thought of itself and its conscious effort to dispel eastern perceptions of the West as an untamed, wild, and uncivilized frontier shaped the four fairs and the exposition promoters’ efforts in what they displayed. Themes of economic opportunity, the natural world and environment, and race, were shown throughout the fairs, proclaiming to visitors that the region west of the Rockies represented the future of the United States.

The Lewis and Clark Exposition was the first world’s fair held on the West Coast of North America. As with other such fairs, organizers in Portland were eager to include China and Chinese culture. In the end, the Chinese government decided not to take part for political reasons. While it might have been grateful to Portland as a city for providing a haven for Chinese persecuted elsewhere, including those driven out from Tacoma and Seattle in the 1880s, and for advocating economic compensation for those victims, the Chinese government refused anyway. It was angry about the mistreatment of Chinese immigrants and other travelers at America’s borders. At other American world’s fairs, local Chinese residents filled the void when the Chinese government did not participate (Chicago, 1893; Omaha, 1898, and Buffalo, 1903). Though Portland’s Chinese population at the time was large and prosperous (the second largest community in the United States) they did not provide input within the fairgrounds. It appears that the Portland Chinese Americans were collaborating with China in protesting American immigration practices. It is also probable that this non-participation was linked to a Chinese boycott of American products in 1905 and to the political and social upheavals within China.

The 1910 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle featured a substantial Chinese exhibit, organized entirely by local Seattle and Portland Chinese. Although the AYPE was the closest to China of any early world’s fair, the Imperial government refused to participate. This was partly for the same reason that it had snubbed Portland’s Lewis and Clark Exposition four years earlier: because officials remembered clearly the insults offered to Chinese, particularly to officials, in connection with the St. Louis Exposition of 1904. However, other issues were involved. The trans-Pacific trade was booming. Businessmen on both sides of the Pacific were getting rich and presumably were reluctant to see their profits cut by officials’ wounded pride. Japan, also represented at the AYPE, was now seen a threat not only to China but to the U.S. as well. The Chinese population of the Pacific Northwest was growing rapidly. China itself teetered on the brink of revolution. Anti-Chinese prejudice in America was falling while Chinese interest in Western technology and institutions reached a peak. All of these factors fed into a complex dynamic of fascination and repulsion as Chinese sought to come to terms with the West in an arena where, for the first time anywhere, a large Chinese population intimately familiar with the Euro-American world sought to build stronger bridges to it.

Held in San Francisco, the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition (PPIE) provides a lens through which to examine the narratives regarding America’s indigenous peoples at that moment in time. After several centuries of incremental depredation and outright pogroms, the United States had reached a condition where many official citizens considered indigenous peoples unthreatening. At the PPIE the exhibits turned from apprehension to eulogy as the national mood changed to one of nostalgia. Native Americans were literally presented under the blanket terms “vanishing” or “conquered” race. Though the changes affecting indigenous peoples in 1915 were profound, the hundreds of thousands of Native Americans still practicing their traditional lifestyles and diverse rituals nationwide gainsaid the much-publicized “demise” of the cultures. Indians were featured in myriad areas of the Exposition: in anthropological exhibits, artistic representations, as performers on the midway, in music and in “living displays” sponsored by the railroads. Two conferences at the Fair attempted to examine the legal status and living conditions of Native Americans. This variety of portrayals at a World’s Fair allows a partial survey of opinions versus realities toward America’s original peoples.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(5) ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION: Citizen Science, Climate Change and Fire in Western North America: A Roundtable Discussion . Organizer: Carl A. Maida (UCLA Schools of Dentistry and Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; cmaida@ucla.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Friday afternoon, 21 June.

Wildland fires in western North America are inevitable, and are usually unpredictable. These fires affect diverse populations in a region: suburban, urban, and rural, wealthy and poor, culturally assimilated and recently immigrated. They disrupt the lives of individuals from every social class and ethnic group. When there is no loss of life, loss of residence, with its attendant displacement, is the central crisis for survivors of a wildland fire. Those displaced from their homes often feel suddenly rootless, an emotion marked by depression, despair and longing for a secure base. Even when there is only minor residential damage, a fire has a major impact. Transportation, water, electricity and other municipal networks are affected, and schools and worksites are damaged. Working adults and school children may be forced to stay at home or be relocated to temporary workplaces and schools. The circumstances that accompany a major fire are generally unfamiliar to most people. These include the physical sensations when experiencing the terrifying forces of strong winds and fires; the ruthlessness of wide scale damage to property; the frustrating disruption of transportation and communication systems; the numbing witnessing of death and injuries, and, in some instances, looting and violence.

Wildland fires impact a community by disrupting families and social networks that continue to share the same physical environment after the event. The community of survivors who experience the fires will most often stay in place and continue on as part of the recovery environment. Fire victims will frequently become involved in collective endeavors out of a sense of communal loss and out of a common need that typifies the shared experience of catastrophe. Recent work on human dimensions in wildland fire stress how resident and community prevention behavior, such as defensible space practices, can minimize risk and thereby limit resource loss after an event.

Increased wildfire activity, together with global resource depletion, biodiversity loss, and climate change contribute to precariousness of the conditions of life, and necessitate persistent accountability. The Anthropocene characterizes the current geological age when, since the industrial era, anthropogenic activities have become the major driver impacting the Earth system—a time when the human domination of nature is challenging our planetary boundaries, with consequent deforestation, pollution, climate change and species loss. Given the scale and complexity of the natural resources, and the human activities that impact the earth system, sustainable and adaptive human-environment interactions will rely upon coherent thinking about how to move forward.

Sustainable practices support ecological, human, and economic health and vitality, with the presumption that resources are finite, and should be used with a view to long-term priorities and consequences. However, cultivating sustainability literacy and public engagement on their behalf requires diverse cultural perspectives, trans-generational timeframes, and local-to-global connectedness. The need to promote participatory approaches to sustainability literacy in the broader public is clear, however few community-based approaches have been developed to date that integrate disciplines into a holistic perspective of Earth’s natural and human systems.

Recent debates have centered on increasing public understanding of science through citizen participation in the production of scientific knowledge and the assessment of its applications. To this end, the science-shop model that originated in the Netherlands in the 1970s and then diffused across Europe during the 1980s is instructive. As part of a new social contract between science and society, science shops form and sustain relationships between experts and citizen groups. They serve as mediating agents to inform clients and also to empower them to use the information and insights. Science shops developed in advance of recent participatory approaches to accountability and the right to information, including community monitoring, citizen report cards, pubic expenditure tracking, and social audits.

Citizen science is another approach that supports the expansion of communities of practice by bridging researchers and the lay public, across diverse populations and subpopulations. Regarding the production or transfer of critical knowledge, citizen science is decidedly personal and interpersonal in style, enacted from the bottom up and most often at the local level. The approach involves science initiated and carried out by citizens not trained to be professional scientists. Early lay efforts to monitor common-pool resources and common property were carried out by users who depended upon a given resource for long-term sustenance. These efforts focused on meeting local and regional challenges of environmental degradation and resource depletion that threatened watersheds, fisheries, and pasturage, with a goal of building consensus among users of a particular resource for mutual benefit.

Citizen science concerns moved toward the ecological and environmental health sciences, as average citizens became more aware of the impact of science and technology on their personal lives and their community’s quality of life. Community residents collaborate with environmental health scientists in universities and community-based organizations have monitored workplace toxins, air and water pollution, household lead, flame retardants in consumer products, and environmental chemicals in breast milk. On-the-ground data collection techniques, such as ground-truthing, use residents’ knowledge to identify pollution sources located in their communities, and verify compiled data derived from standardized risk-screening environmental indicators. The continued growth of social capital through citizen science on behalf of sustainability will require broader citizen access to electronically transmitted information and interactive communication technologies to stimulate interest in local affairs and participation in local, regional and national policy dialogues. Moreover, contemporary science is not succeeding in technical or social terms of keeping temperature rising to no more than 1.5°C. Two recent reports, namely Global Warming of 1.5°C, by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and Yale’s Climate Change and the American Mind, expose and lament that, which gives citizen science a new urgency and clear direction.

Ethical concerns also extend to the need for scientists and policy makers to view environmental assessment as a social process that involves a wide range of stakeholders in the coproduction of knowledge, through citizen science initiatives. A participatory approach would bring about a more encompassing knowledge commons as the assessment process would involve the local knowledge of laypersons. Ultimately, the goals are those of translating research into action to promote better decision-making and accountability so that information, itself a common-pool resource, flows smoothly between experts and members of diverse constituent groups. This would permit sustainability specialists and the lay public to meaningfully engage in informed dialogues. These are more inclusive and flexible learning spaces that combine local knowledge together with new knowledge and skills to realize transformative action for participatory sustainable development. The ensuing shift toward local learning and local actors retaking control of decision-making, and a return to more grounded conceptions of human and ecological community break down the knowledge asymmetries of expertise in the expert-lay relationship. This can only be achieved through a mix of collaborative methods, such as citizen science initiatives, and participatory assessment approaches. Through these pathways for further learning and action on behalf of sustainability and the global commons, we may realize a more socially responsive transfer of knowledge, and greater accountability, across diverse sectors and constituencies.

With a goal of multidisciplinary dialogue in mind, this session will focus on the role of citizen science in regional concerns across western North America, such as wildfires and other climate change impacts, and combine didactic and reflective activities to engage diverse audience members, including teachers and informal science educators, and presenters in a professional learning community experience. Panelists in roundtable format will discuss current issues and future trends in public understanding of science through citizen participation in the production of scientific knowledge and the assessment of its applications. The intent is to provide an opportunity for collaborative inquiry and a dialogue on how best to promote participatory approaches in the classroom, in the community, and beyond.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(6) Boise Extravaganza in Set Theory (BEST). Organizers: Liljana Babinkostova, John Clemens, Samuel Coskey, and Marion Scheepers (Department of Mathematics, Boise State University, Boise, ID). Scientific Committee: Natasha Dobrinen (University of Denver) and Simon Thomas (Rutgers University). Contact: liljanababinkostova@boisestate.edu.
SCHEDULED FOR 2 full days, Wednesday and Thursday, 19 and 20 June.

This symposium is a continuation of the well-known Boise Extravaganza in Set Theory (BEST) conference. BEST focuses on the mathematical discipline called Set Theory, and its applications in other disciplines in Mathematics. BEST has been a symposium of the AAAS Pacific Division since 2013; previously it was hosted at Boise State University in Boise, Idaho.

Set Theory is the mathematical foundation for the study of the infinitary objects that routinely arise in Mathematics and its applications, and in the mathematical sciences. Contemporary Set Theory research addresses basic questions about provability, decidability, complexity, and the relative strength of postulates or hypotheses in mathematized scientific theories. Set Theoretic methods serve as powerful tools for applications in many other mathematical disciplines, including algebra, analysis, combinatorics, topology and more.

The plenary speakers at the BEST symposium are successful set theorists from a variety of career stages who will present high-level scientific talks in several areas of set theory and its applications. The BEST symposium will also host numerous invited and contributed talks in Set Theory and its applications, including current students who will present recent research accomplishments.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(7) Seeing with New Eyes: The Role of New Scientific Techniques and Perspectives in Revolutionizing the Search for the First Americans. Organizers: Matthew R. Des Lauriers (Department of Anthropology, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA) and Claudia Garcia Des Lauriers (Department of Geography and Anthropology, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA: clauriers@cpp.edu.
SCHEDULED FOR Thursday morning, 20 June.

The geographic origins and initial travel routes of the first human communities to migrate from the Old World into the twin continents of North and South America have been subject to intense interest by scholars around the world for over 500 years. Following the dramatic discoveries of the early 20th Century that firmly established the Terminal Pleistocene (approx. 13,000 calendar years before present) occupation of the Americas by sophisticated big game hunters bearing the iconic Clovis points, major changes in perspective did not become salient until the beginning of the 21st Century. In the last 20 years, however, game-changing discoveries have occurred across the hemisphere, ranging from new dates from remarkably old sites such as Monte Verde in Chile, to detailed paleolandscape reconstructions, to greater understanding of the genetic structure of these early migrant communities from finds in Oregon, Montana, and several sites in Latin America. In fact, it has often been discoveries in Latin America that have forced a change in perspective within this constellation of research agendas. Now, armed with new scientific techniques and a perspective no longer bound by decades of status quo thinking, scholars across the hemisphere are changing not only what we know, but how we know it in fascinating and revolutionary ways.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            

(10) Active Learning in Sciences: What Really Works and How To Implement It. Organizer: Carol Ferguson (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; ferguson@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Wednesday morning, 19 June.

This symposium explores different practices for actively engaging undergraduates in their learning, regardless of the class size and science discipline. Join us for a candid conversation about innovative and implementable techniques to improve the engagement of all undergraduates in science and ultimately improve their science quotient. The symposia speakers will also provide specific examples of techniques they use in their courses that can realistically be implemented in small and large college-level science courses. A demonstration of specific techniques will follow the formal presentations.

ABSTRACTS: Click HERE to download.

            

(11) Pollinators, Buzzways, and Private Gardens: A Grass Roots Effort to Save Pollinators in the Rogue Valley. Organizer: Brian H. Smith (School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ; brian.h.smith@asu.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR all day Thursday, 20 June.

In August 2014, Talent Oregon became the second designated ‘Bee City USA’ in the United States. Very quickly, Talent was joined by Ashland, Phoenix, and Gold Hill, and just this year, Medford become one too. At the same time, Southern Oregon University became the first ‘Bee Campus USA’ in the country! Starting with a few private gardens, expanding to public spaces, pollinator gardens in the Rogue Valley are now being mapped by Pollinator Project Rogue Valley and SOU, to identify locations of ‘Buzzways” for pollinators.

This symposium will describe the development of the public awareness and public commitment to pollinators, as well as the stresses and challenges to pollinators here and elsewhere. The symposium will also consider the complexities of human behavior on pollinators, as well as its consequences.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(12) Opportunities and Challenges for Large Data Sets and their Analysis in Contemporary and Future Science. Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Wednesday morning, 19 June.

It is easy to argue that the growth of computational power combined with the ability to acquire and store massive amounts of data has turned all fields of science into a branch of data science. This symposium will explore the role of data and its analysis across a range of scientific and technology applications, while also considering current data related challenges and limitations in each. From analysis of complex biological systems, to the technical challenge presented by building truly autonomous vehicles, the symposium will consider commonalities and differences in the role of data and its analysis. The symposium will also consider likely future trends in data analysis, including machine learning and AI, being driven by these applications. Finally, we will consider how the human nervous system itself may manage its own big data challenges.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(13) Transforming Agriculture in the Rogue Valley: Moving from Mono-culture to “Agra-diversity”. Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Friday morning, 21 June.

For many years and continuing to this day, the agriculturally rich Rogue River Valley of Southern Oregon has produced a significant proportion of the pears consumed throughout the United States. In recent years, however, the Rogue valley has seen a dramatic increase in the diversity of agricultural products produced as well as a growing interest and public concern regarding the local consequences of GMO and pesticide laden conventional agricultural processes. Several years ago for example, Jackson County banned the growing of GMO crops. The valley is also seen as a national leader in farm to table initiatives and local sourcing of agricultural product including organic seed crops, vineyards and wines, and hemp. Such products commonly derive from organic, agroecological and regenerative farming practices.

The speakers in this symposium will each describe different aspects of the ongoing transformation of agriculture in the Rogue Valley, including the growing emphasis on organic and regenerative farming methods including those farming practices that have the potential for regenerative farming, as well as farming practices that have the potential to mitigate climate change.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(14) All of Us Research Program: The Precision Medicine Initiative. Organizer: Carolina Livi (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; livic@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Thursday morning, 20 June.

Evidence based medicine started enabling patients to get more individualized care based on research information. Clearly individual variation including genetic and environmental factors play a role in disease progression and also in treatment response. Technology now enables precise genomic assessment and mass spectrometry based assay measurements of drugs, proteins and endogenous metabolites with high sensitivity and specificity. Knowledge from biomedical research can be used not only to discover and develop new biomarkers and treatments, but also to identify patients most likely to benefit from intervention and for longitudinal monitoring of responses. In this symposium a number of examples of how the promise of precision medicine is changing the approach to translational research will be covered.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(15) Character, Illusion, Lighting, Sound and Madness as Viewed by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Thursday afternoon, 20 June.

This symposium will consider the science, engineering and psychology that goes into the success of Ashland’s world famous Oregon Shakespeare Festival. The symposium will consider how actors create the inner world of the character, how what we say affects what we hear and perceive, including how voice and text change the perception of characters, of region, of class and space. The symposium will describe the smoke and mirrors being how artisans create illusion including illusions created by the automation team, as well as how sound designers create an auditory landscape, and lighting designers sculpt the air. Finally, a panel of actors and neurobiologists will talk about how they represent madness as well as other aspects of the human condition.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(16) How Core Equipment Facilities are Changing the Nature of Scientific Investigations in Universities. Organizer: Carolina Livi (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; livic@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Wednesday afternoon, 19 June.

Twenty-Five Years ago, the National Science Foundation launched a new funding program for biological science designed to encourage universities to build core equipment facilities that could serve the laboratories of multiple principle investigators. While a large part of the motivation for this program was the impracticality of supporting increasingly complex and expensive equipment in many individual laboratories, the NSF also recognized that core facilities also provided an opportunity for new forms of collaboration and cooperation. Now, 25 years later, core facilities are a central feature of scientific research throughout the world.

The speakers in this symposium will consider the current consequences and future opportunities represented by this relatively new form of scientific organization. Topics will include the modern structure and management of core facilities, their impact on the way science is conducted, and the opportunities for collaboration and cooperation provided by core facilities, with a particular focus on the development of new software systems that use core facilities to develop more sophisticated scientific work flows. The symposium will also consider efforts to link data collection to more sophisticated systems of data analysis and ultimately to the construction of models of biological processes, with examples taken from bioinformatics, immunology and computational neuroscience.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(17) The Social, Economic and Political Impacts of Climate Change. Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Friday morning, 21 June.

Much of the conversation surrounding climate change, to date, has focused on "hard science” measures like the abundance of greenhouse gases, global changes in air and sea temperatures, rates of polar ice melting, increased intensity of storms, and expected the global rise in sea levels. With climate change now largely regarded as an established fact, attention has begun to turn to what might be considered more local and ’softer science’ influences on the social, economic and political fabric of society. The speakers in this symposium will consider the consequences of climate change from this “softer science" perspective.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(18) FIRES!!! Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR all day Friday, 21 June.

Climate models have been predicting for many years that expected changes in climate will be manifest not only through climate measures (temperature, rain fall, sea water rise, etc.), but also through associated changes in the dynamics of the environment, including the incidence and severity of forest fires. While one can argue that forest fires have always been a component of life especially in the Western United States, the combination of climate change with forest management practices over the last 100 years has now put the west at considerable economic and environmental risk.

This symposium will consider the likely impact of forest fires on the economy and quality of life in the Western United States in general and in the Rogue Valley in particular. The symposium will include information on how local municipalities and businesses are seeking to accommodate or mitigate the threat from forest fires, as well as the outstanding concerns and challenges of forest fires going forward.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(19) Adaptations to Climate Change in Oregon Wineries. Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Thursday morning, 20 June.

Vigneron’s and Vintners must manage the grapes they grow on relatively long time scales. After planting it typically takes 3 years before a new grape vine produces grapes, and grape vines have been known to produce grapes in vineyards for up to 120 years. This means that managing vineyards takes place on long time scales. Grapes are also well known to be highly sensitive to soil and climactic conditions, even on a year to year basis. Accordingly, the additional variation now related to climate change, itself unpredictable has added an additional uncertainty to the management of wineries.

Over the last 30 years, Oregon in general and southern Oregon in particular has seen a considerable influx of new wineries. In this symposium, several local Vigneron’s and Vintners will talk about the ways in which they are anticipating adapting to ongoing climate change.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(20) Influencing Local and Regional Public Policy on Climate Change. Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Wednesday morning, 19 June.

The overwhelming consensus in the scientific community is that climate change is not only happening, but it is already here. While more global questions about how to address the factors contributing to climate change are important, many believe that the cutting edge of both climate research and climate policy has to do with understanding, adjusting to, and even mitigating the regional and local effects of climate change by affecting public policy. The presenters in this symposium are all involved directly in the process of influencing public policy with respect to climate change. Each will describe their current efforts as well as ‘lessons learned’ in the process and current challenges and opportunities. They will also address their efforts to engage the larger community in this effort.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(21) Environmental and Agricultural Measuring and Monitoring in the Rogue Valley. Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Thursday afternoon, 20 June.

The geology and geography of Southern Oregon is highly diverse with significant variations in soil composition, hydrology, and climate. In addition, the Rogue Valley has been a major agricultural producer for more than 100 years, providing, for example, a significant percentage of the pears consumed in the United States. In recent years, the rich soils, relative abundance of water and agriculturally friendly climate has resulted in a considerable increase in the diversity of local agricultural products, with a growing emphasis on organic production and regenerative agriculture. In addition, Southern Oregon is a significant producer of cannabis as well as hemp.

This symposium will consider the challenges and opportunities presented for sophisticated measurement and monitoring of the chemical composition of the Rogue Valley’s soil, water, and air, as well as the chemical composition of the foods and agricultural products it produces. The symposium will specifically consider the importance of this effort in the context of an environment long subjected to the use of agricultural chemicals (pesticides for example), as well as the growing economic importance of food products being marketed for their health benefits.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(22) Engaging the Public in Science: Where Are They and How do We Get There? Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Wednesday afternoon, 19 June.

Because of public suspicions regarding the safety of childhood vaccinations, for the first time in many years, municipalities in the United States are confronting outbreaks of childhood diseases that were essentially eliminated just a few years ago. At the same time, national debates on important societal issues including immigration and climate change are being tainted by the assertion of alternate facts, or a complete neglect of facts at all. In a recent book titled “the Death of Expertise”, author Tom Nichols asserted that a growing number of individuals in the United States now claim that their personal opinions hold equal weight to the opinion of experts. A recent survey conducted by the University of Nevada found that only 14% of the American Public had a great deal of confidence in academia. As similar survey conducted by Harvard in 2006 found that percentage to be 41%. Similarly, a survey by the Pew Research Center in 2015 found that the number of respondents who said that science had “made life more difficult” rose 50% from 2009 to 2015, while a survey conducted by the US Government found that 35% of respondents have “a lot” of trust in scientists, the number who did not trust scientists at all increased by over 50% comparted to a similar poll in 2013.

Clearly, science and scientists have a problem. This symposium will reflect on what appears to be a growing disconnect between science, scientific information and the public, while also considering the possible origins of the problem and what might be done about it. The symposium will consider programs and projects attempting to bridge this growing gap, while also considering what further can be done.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(23) The Future of Scientific Publication in a Time of Increasingly Complex and Distributed Science. Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR TBA.

1440 is the date generally accepted for the invention of movable type printing (i.e. the printing press) by Johannes Gutenberg. Don Quixote, generally regarded as the first novel with modern structure was published by Cervantes in 1605, 165 years later. It was another 60 years (1665) before the Secretary of the Royal Society of London organized the first periodical focused exclusively on Science. The full adoption and best use of a new technology clearly takes time. Originally titled Philosophical Transactions: Giving some Account of the present Undertakings, Studies, and Labours of the Ingenious in many considerable parts of the World” the journals founder, Henry Oldenburg, defined the purpose of the new journal at the outset to support “registration” (date stamping and provenance), “certification” (peer review), “archiving” and of particular importance “dissemination”. Referring to the importance of dissemination in particular, Oldenburg wrote to Robert Boyle in 1664, that through the journal: “...all ingenious men will thereby be incouraged to impact their knowledge and discoveries".

The question addressed in this symposium is whether and how the digitalization of scientific (and human) communication and scientific enterprise could and should re-implement these original objectives for scientific publishing. Specifically, we will consider how well matched the more than 350 year old form of communication currently represented by off-line and most on- line scientific journals is to the process of evaluating and communicating the results of ever more complex and inter-related scientific investigations and perhaps especially the growing use of complex numerical simulation-based modeling in science. It is not clear, for example, whether the traditional form of peer review is adequate to the task of evaluating such complex models, or that the traditional form of publication supports their testing or replication. Looking forward, it also seems plausible to suggest that a reinvention of scientific publication could, in principle, even support a new form of model-based scientific collaboration in a highly interconnected digital scientific world. The participants in this workshop will attempt to construct a plausible description and perhaps a blue print for reimplementing the structure and form of scientific publishing to advance Oldenburg’s original objectives.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(24) TOWN HALL EVENT: Different Styles, Different Insights, Different Science: Using Maker Tech to Teach STEM. Organizers and moderators: Joan Horvath and Rich Cameron (Nonscriptum LLC, Pasadena, CA; joan@nonscriptum.com and rich@nonscriptum.com) and Lindsay Yazzolino (Touch Graphics, Brookline, MA; ly@touchgraphics.com).
SCHEDULED FOR Thursday afternoon, 20 June.

Maker Faires have been drawing huge crowds worldwide as people flock to explore how they can learn subjects like electronics, 3D printing, coding and traditional trades in a do-it-yourself fashion. Yet this energy has been slow to penetrate traditional STEM teaching even though there are significant overlaps.

The organizers will start off with brief remarks about their experiences developing maker-style STEM materials in formal and informal educational settings, including teaching the visually impaired. They have found that coming at teaching science and math hands-on often brings new insights, and will bring along some examples.

Attendees who have done their own explorations in teaching this way are encouraged to attend to share their successes and lessons learned. Those who are thinking about it will be welcome to join in the discussion about how they might adopt some of these ideas as well.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(25) TOWN HALL EVENT: Advancing STEM: Increasing Diversity in Academia and Industry. Organizers and moderators: Hala Shepmann (Department of Chemistry, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; schepmah@sou.edu) and Maria Bertagnolli (Department of Biology, Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA; bertagnolli@gonzaga.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Wednesday afternoon, 19 June.

Despite this repeatedly reported research finding, and acknowledgement of the value of diversity in the mission statement of many organizations, increasing STEM workforce diversity continues to be a challenging goal for academia and industry alike. Reasons given to explain this slow change in STEM discipline demographics include low numbers of qualified candidates, resistance to targeted searches, and poor "fit". Beyond recruitment, retention of underrepresented groups in STEM must also be addressed. The workplace environment is a key factor in attracting and retaining underrepresented groups. Full integration requires consideration of racial, gender, cultural, social, economic, interactional, structural, and climate influences and sufficient “critical mass” to support a diverse community. This town hall-style session will provide an opportunity to share and discuss current data, persisting obstacles to and inequities in career advancement, and successful strategies to directly address the commonly expounded reasons for the lack of diversification in STEM.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(26) Strategies for Active Learning in Undergraduate Education. Organizer: Julia Ruppell (Department of Biology, University of Portland, Portland, OR; ruppell@up.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Thursday morning, 20 June.

The process of engaging students in active learning is connected to positive learning outcomes. Many science departments in higher education are embracing this phenomenon by encouraging instructors to use more active learning in their courses. However, many instructors would benefit from increased knowledge of active learning methods and their usefulness for covering different content in their courses. Instructors benefit when they can learn from others about appropriate teaching strategies and methods along with their potential drawbacks, and this in turn benefits students. This symposium aims to engage faculty and students who are interested in promoting active learning in college science classrooms. We will hear from different presenters about the methods they use, what has worked well for their courses and potential hurdles to utilizing active learning in undergraduate education. The information in the presentations can be applied to inform instructional decision-making and future research about active learning in college science courses.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(27) TOWN HALL EVENT: What can Scientific Societies Do For You? Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Thursday afternoon, 20 June.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science was founded on September 20th, 1848 and is therefore 171 years old. Sigma Xi, the scientific research honor society, was founded in1886, 133 years ago. This symposium will take place during the 100th annual meeting of the Pacific Division of AAAS and will consider the current and future value of scientific societies. How have changes in the structure of science and scientific careers changed the role that scientific societies play within science and for individual scientists? What are the current challenges facing scientific societies and how might we imagine their roles changing in the future?

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(28) The Opioid Epidemic: Up Close and Personal. Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Friday morning, 21 June.

According to the National Institutes of Drug Abuse, at present, more than 130 people die in the United States every day as a result of overdosing on Opioids. As most Americans are now aware, the misuse and addiction of opioids, including prescription pain relievers, heroin and synthetic opioids such as Fentanyl is a serious national crisis that affects public health as well as social and economic welfare. This symposium will consider the global structure and nature of the crisis, using mathematical modeling tools, as well as it’s on the ground, local impact. The symposium will also seek to put the current crisis in the larger context of the history of drug addiction in the United States.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(29) Interventions in Aging. Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Thursday afternoon, 20 June.

In Act III scene 2 of Richard II, Shakespeare penned: “Woe, destruction, ruin, and decay; The worst is death, and death will have his day.” This symposium will consider the state of development of several modern interventions in aging intended to at least reduce the Woe, destruction, ruin and decay of the process, if not eventually perhaps to deny death its day altogether. The symposium will consider recent developments in drugs that have shown promise in expanding life span, what is known about nutrition and aging, as well as the growing application of technology to mitigate or even reverse the consequences of aging. In reviewing these technologies, the symposium will also consider the overall objectives of research into aging interventions, as well as possible limitations in these interventions.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(30) Current Challenges in Corrosion and Engineering. Organizer:Vilupanur A. Ravi (Chemical and Materials Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA; vravi@cpp.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR all day Wednesday, 19 June.

The corrosion of metallic materials affects almost every conceivable industrial sector and is a matter of major economic concern. This symposium will provide an overview of the work on corrosion and protective coverings/ surface modification, from the Principle Investigators and students in several laboratories working on this problem on the west coast.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            

(32) Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: SUSTAIN!!!. Organizer: James Bower (Department of Biology, Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; bowerj@sou.edu).
SCHEDULED FOR Friday afternoon, 21 June.

While many attribute the movement to recycle to the start of the modern environmental movement in the 1970’s, in fact, it can be argued that creative reuse of materials by humans almost certainly dates back thousands of years, especially for scarce commodities. However, in the 1960s and 70’s, the focus shifted from getting the most out of materials to an effort to deal with the massive amounts of waste produced during the second half of the 20th Century. 50 years later, the focus appears to be shifting again towards the larger and more complex task of resources sustainability, with its many interrelated components and parts.

This symposium will consider current efforts to achieve resource sustainability as applied to several different types of institutions both public and private. Presentations will specifically focus on the challenges and opportunities represented in several local efforts to promote long term resource sustainability.

ABSTRACTS should be available here by the end of April.

            







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